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In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ

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In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2016, 15:11
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OG Q 2017 New Question
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2016, 16:38
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AbdurRakib wrote:
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Dear AbdurRakib
Another good question. I am happy to respond. :-)

Statement #1: this gives us the length of OP, and we have the slope of PQ, but we have no idea how high Q goes. Because we don't know this, we can't compute the slope of OQ. This statement, alone and by itself, is insufficient.

Now, forget statement #1.

Statement #2: this gives us Q = (5,4). Well, we know O is at the origin, (0,0). We know this, because this is one thing we are allowed to assume from a coordinate geometry diagram: if a point looks like it is at the origin, and especially this point is given the name "O," then we can be sure that it is exactly at the origin. Thus, we know the coordinates of O & Q, so we can find the slope, m = 4/5. With this statement, we can directly compute an answer to the prompt question. This statement, alone and by itself, is sufficient.

First statement insufficient, second sufficient. Answer = (B)

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2016, 08:30
B

this is a good question.

1)insuff

2) Q co-ordinaes are given and O is origin.So slope can be found

B

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2017, 07:32
AbdurRakib wrote:
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Lets Assume P (a,b) and Q (x,y)
It is given that
Slope of OP
\(b/a=1/2\)
\(a=2b\)

Slope of OQ is \(y/x\)...Required..

Slope of PQ will be \(y-b/x-a = 2\)

y-b=2(x-2b)
y=2x-3b

(1)
OP = 2\sqrt{5}
OP = \sqrt{(a)^2 + (b^2)}
20 = a^2 + b^2
We already know a =2b
20 = 5b^2
b=+2 or -2
then a would be +4 or -4
If we use (4,2) to solve for (x,y) to reach to slope then
y-2/x-4 =2
y-2=2x-8
y=2x-6 We do not have another equation to solve for (x,y)

If we use (-4,-2) to solve for (x,y) to reach slope then
y+2/x+4 =2
y+2=2x+8
y=2x+6 We do not have another equation to solve for (x,y)

Hence Not Sufficient

(2) Q(5,4)--> x=5, y=4

y/x = 4/5

Bunuel Can u explain the approach, my wife is saying something is wrong :roll:
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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2017, 10:22
mikemcgarry why are we allowed to assume that O is at origin?

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2017, 15:15
ambar09d wrote:
mikemcgarry why are we allowed to assume that O is at origin?

Dear ambar09d,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, on GMAT PS geometry diagrams, there are lots of special cases that we can't assume---we can assume parallel or right angles or two equal sides simply because something looks that way. "Almost" doesn't count in geometry.

Nevertheless, there are a few basic assumptions we can make. If a line looks straight, we can assume that it is straight, that is has no hidden bend or curve to it. Also, if a point is portrayed as "on" a line, we can assume that it is in fact, "on" the line and not simply near the the line. In this diagram, point O is shown at the juncture of the x- and y-axes. We absolutely can assume that it is on both of those lines, and therefore, must be the intersection, the origin. Also, conventionally, the origin is often labeled O. For a problem to have a point labeled O near the origin but not exactly on it would a level of deviousness that we simply don't see on the GMAT.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2017, 23:21
ambar09d wrote:
mikemcgarry why are we allowed to assume that O is at origin?



Well x-axis and y-axis only meet at 1 point that is Origin with co-ordinate (0,0).

By figure O is marked at intersection of 2 axis so its the origin.

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2017, 23:27
Slope OP=1/2
Slope PQ=2
Find slope OQ
Assume p =(px,py)
Q= (qx,qy)
And as O is origin O= (0,0).

So slope OP py/px=1/2
slope PQ = (qy-py)/(qx-px) =2
Find slope qy/qx

1) it gives distance of OP =2root5
by distance formula px^2+py^2 =(2root5)^2
As py/px=1/2 => px=2py. Putting this value in above equation
=> 5py^2=20
=> py=2 => px=4

Putting these values in slope PQ => (qy-2)/(qx-4)=2
Not enough detail to find value of qx and qy or there ratios.

Not sufficient.

2) Direct co-ordinate of Q is given (5,4), so we cna find slope of line OQ.
Slope OQ = (5-0)/(4-0) = 5/4

Sufficient

Answer: B

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2017, 10:11
i am confused. i think d is correct.

in 1
we now lengthe and slope we can find the coordinate of p
similarly we can find coordinate of q

and 1 is sufficient.

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2017, 10:54
thangvietnam wrote:
i am confused. i think d is correct.

in 1
we now lengthe and slope we can find the coordinate of p
similarly we can find coordinate of q

and 1 is sufficient.


Can you please try to find coordinates of Q using the information given in statement 1 and share the solution?

Check the detailed solution provided by Luckisnoexcuse, mikemcgarry and me. We have solved the question in detail and proved that statement 1 alone is not sufficient. So answer must be B.
And i think its official question, so you can check the solution from Official OG 2017 as well :)

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In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2017, 10:27
thangvietnam wrote:
i am confused. i think d is correct.

in 1
we now lengthe and slope we can find the coordinate of p
similarly we can find coordinate of q

and 1 is sufficient.

Dear thangvietnam,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

From Statement #1, we are given the length of OP, and we already know the slope of OP, so we absolutely could find the (x, y) coordinates of point P. The trouble is that this is NOT what the question asks. It's asking for the slope of OQ, and having full information about OP and point P tells us zilch about point Q or segment OQ. From the prompt & Statement #1 combined, we know neither the length nor the slope of OQ--in fact, the question is asking for that slope.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2017, 14:07
mikemcgarry wrote:
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike
sorry but could you please clarify why knowing A is not enough?
we know the slope of OP, basically it's (y-0)/(x-0)= 1/2 or 2y=x
then we know the OP length which is 2\sqrt{5} or
OP=SQRT((x-0)^2+(y-0)^2)= 2sqrt5 then knowing that 2y= x
we can calculate and find y, then again knowing the slope 1/2 find x.

Then, knowing coordinates of point P (x,y) and the slope of line PQ = 2 we can find coordinates of point Q
then knowing those coordinates and coordinates of O (0,0) we can find the slope of OQ


It's more than 3 mins of calculations but still you will get there, what I'm missing here?

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2017, 15:06
sorry Mike, got it, 2 variables x and y to find Q in one equality :) not possible to solve

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Re: In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ   [#permalink] 15 Nov 2017, 15:06
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In the figure above,line segment OP has slope 1/2 and line segment PQ

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