Last visit was: 17 Jul 2024, 06:39 It is currently 17 Jul 2024, 06:39
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Manager
Manager
Joined: 14 Jun 2016
Posts: 112
Own Kudos [?]: 205 [43]
Given Kudos: 54
Location: India
GMAT 1: 610 Q49 V24
GMAT 2: 690 Q49 V33
WE:Engineering (Manufacturing)
Send PM
Most Helpful Reply
Manager
Manager
Joined: 14 Jun 2016
Posts: 112
Own Kudos [?]: 205 [6]
Given Kudos: 54
Location: India
GMAT 1: 610 Q49 V24
GMAT 2: 690 Q49 V33
WE:Engineering (Manufacturing)
Send PM
General Discussion
Manager
Manager
Joined: 04 May 2020
Posts: 119
Own Kudos [?]: 17 [0]
Given Kudos: 25
Location: Italy
Schools: IESE'23
Send PM
Current Student
Joined: 04 Sep 2019
Posts: 52
Own Kudos [?]: 30 [0]
Given Kudos: 623
Location: Germany
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
Schools: Judge '23 (A)
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V40
GPA: 3.1
WE:Operations (Manufacturing)
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Struggling between B and D. Why B?

In my opinion the effect of present perfect in D is still valid and therefore the answer may be right. Does anyone have an extensive explanation?

Cheers
Current Student
Joined: 23 Apr 2018
Posts: 24
Own Kudos [?]: 17 [0]
Given Kudos: 245
Location: India
Concentration: Economics, General Management
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V40
WE:Asset Management (Consumer Products)
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
rudywip wrote:
Struggling between B and D. Why B?

In my opinion the effect of present perfect in D is still valid and therefore the answer may be right. Does anyone have an extensive explanation?

Cheers


not really an extensive explanation but I believe D is wrong because much maligned is used differently incorrectly modifying the family member
Current Student
Joined: 04 Sep 2019
Posts: 52
Own Kudos [?]: 30 [0]
Given Kudos: 623
Location: Germany
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
Schools: Judge '23 (A)
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V40
GPA: 3.1
WE:Operations (Manufacturing)
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
GMATNinja can you help us out, please?
Director
Director
Joined: 05 Jul 2020
Posts: 584
Own Kudos [?]: 303 [0]
Given Kudos: 151
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V38
WE:Accounting (Accounting)
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
hsin281 wrote:
rudywip wrote:
Struggling between B and D. Why B?

In my opinion the effect of present perfect in D is still valid and therefore the answer may be right. Does anyone have an extensive explanation?

Cheers


not really an extensive explanation but I believe D is wrong because much maligned is used differently incorrectly modifying the family member


Hey, it is supposed to modify the family member and it conveys the same meaning in all the options.
Current Student
Joined: 23 Apr 2018
Posts: 24
Own Kudos [?]: 17 [0]
Given Kudos: 245
Location: India
Concentration: Economics, General Management
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V40
WE:Asset Management (Consumer Products)
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Brian123 wrote:
hsin281 wrote:
rudywip wrote:
Struggling between B and D. Why B?

In my opinion the effect of present perfect in D is still valid and therefore the answer may be right. Does anyone have an extensive explanation?

Cheers


not really an extensive explanation but I believe D is wrong because much maligned is used differently incorrectly modifying the family member


Hey, it is supposed to modify the family member and it conveys the same meaning in all the options.

You are right, my bad

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
Joined: 31 Mar 2020
Posts: 5
Own Kudos [?]: 8 [0]
Given Kudos: 123
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
GMATNinja can you help , explain how D is preferred over B
Intern
Intern
Joined: 09 Jun 2022
Posts: 35
Own Kudos [?]: 9 [1]
Given Kudos: 46
Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V40
GPA: 3.0
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
1
Kudos
It’s the had vs has . Recently divorced , reassured all signify that the event is being talked about in the past tense. At least that’s what helped me choose B .

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 10 Aug 2021
Posts: 372
Own Kudos [?]: 39 [0]
Given Kudos: 226
Send PM
The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Comma+V-ing (B) AND adj clause (D) are the same meaning, so this should NOt be the main split.
I guess the main difference is the tense: D uses present perfect, and maybe this is why D is wrong.
Experts' Global Representative
Joined: 10 Jul 2017
Posts: 5128
Own Kudos [?]: 4693 [2]
Given Kudos: 38
Location: India
GMAT Date: 11-01-2019
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
2
Kudos
Expert Reply
Mavisdu1017 wrote:
Comma+V-ing (B) AND adj clause (D) are the same meaning, so this should NOt be the main split.
I guess the main difference is the tense: D uses present perfect, and maybe this is why D is wrong.


Hello Mavisdu1017,

We hope this finds you well.

To provide a bit of clarity here, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" and "who has recently divorced an immensely popular woman" actually convey slightly different meanings.

Due to the use of the "comma + present participle ("verb+ing" - "having" in this sentence)" construction, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" conveys a cause-effect relationship between the royal family member recently divorcing an immensely popular woman and him reassuring his family that he would not remarry without public support; remember, the introduction of present participle ("verb+ing"- “having” in this case) after comma generally leads to a cause-effect relationship; the present participle phrase can also come before the main clause.

To understand the concept of "Comma Plus Present Participle for Cause-Effect Relationship" on GMAT, you may want to watch the following video (~3 minutes):



All the best!
Experts' Global Team
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 10 Aug 2021
Posts: 372
Own Kudos [?]: 39 [0]
Given Kudos: 226
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
ExpertsGlobal5 wrote:
Mavisdu1017 wrote:
Comma+V-ing (B) AND adj clause (D) are the same meaning, so this should NOt be the main split.
I guess the main difference is the tense: D uses present perfect, and maybe this is why D is wrong.


Hello Mavisdu1017,

We hope this finds you well.

To provide a bit of clarity here, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" and "who has recently divorced an immensely popular woman" actually convey slightly different meanings.

Due to the use of the "comma + present participle ("verb+ing" - "having" in this sentence)" construction, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" conveys a cause-effect relationship between the royal family member recently divorcing an immensely popular woman and him reassuring his family that he would not remarry without public support; remember, the introduction of present participle ("verb+ing"- “having” in this case) after comma generally leads to a cause-effect relationship; the present participle phrase can also come before the main clause.

To understand the concept of "Comma Plus Present Participle for Cause-Effect Relationship" on GMAT, you may want to watch the following video (~3 minutes):



All the best!
Experts' Global Team

ExpertsGlobal5 hello expert,thanks for your explanation. ANd is the present perfect in D correct?
Experts' Global Representative
Joined: 10 Jul 2017
Posts: 5128
Own Kudos [?]: 4693 [0]
Given Kudos: 38
Location: India
GMAT Date: 11-01-2019
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Mavisdu1017 wrote:
ExpertsGlobal5 wrote:
Mavisdu1017 wrote:
Comma+V-ing (B) AND adj clause (D) are the same meaning, so this should NOt be the main split.
I guess the main difference is the tense: D uses present perfect, and maybe this is why D is wrong.


Hello Mavisdu1017,

We hope this finds you well.

To provide a bit of clarity here, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" and "who has recently divorced an immensely popular woman" actually convey slightly different meanings.

Due to the use of the "comma + present participle ("verb+ing" - "having" in this sentence)" construction, "having recently divorced an immensely popular woman" conveys a cause-effect relationship between the royal family member recently divorcing an immensely popular woman and him reassuring his family that he would not remarry without public support; remember, the introduction of present participle ("verb+ing"- “having” in this case) after comma generally leads to a cause-effect relationship; the present participle phrase can also come before the main clause.

To understand the concept of "Comma Plus Present Participle for Cause-Effect Relationship" on GMAT, you may want to watch the following video (~3 minutes):



All the best!
Experts' Global Team

ExpertsGlobal5 hello expert,thanks for your explanation. ANd is the present perfect in D correct?


Hello Mavisdu1017,

We hope this finds you well.

To answer your query, the use of the present perfect tense is correct here, as the action concluded in the recent past, but the use of this tense alongside the adverb "recently" is redundant; remember, the present perfect tense (marked by the use of the helping verb “has/have”) is also used to refer to actions that concluded in the recent past; however, the use of present perfect tense is redundant if the sentence otherwise indicates that the action concluded in the recent past, such as through the use of “recent” or “recently”.

We hope this helps.
All the best!
Experts' Global Team
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 10 Aug 2021
Posts: 372
Own Kudos [?]: 39 [0]
Given Kudos: 226
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
ExpertsGlobal5 hi expert, I mean whether should use present perfect or past perfect? Cuz “reassured” is simple past.
User avatar
Non-Human User
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 17502
Own Kudos [?]: 868 [0]
Given Kudos: 0
Send PM
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The much-maligned royal family member, having come off a recent divorc [#permalink]
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6984 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts