GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 10 Dec 2018, 18:26

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free lesson on number properties

     December 10, 2018

     December 10, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 11, 2018

     December 11, 2018

     09:00 PM EST

     10:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics. December 11 at 9 PM EST.

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 2201
Premium Member CAT Tests
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 09:14
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

47% (00:48) correct 53% (00:53) wrong based on 240 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Project SC Butler: Day 25 Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities,

(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities,

(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and

(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained,

(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities,

NOTE: IN YOUR ANSWER, PLEASE STATE THE MEANING OF THE QUESTION IN YOUR OWN WORDS.


The best or excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 28 Nov 2017
Posts: 61
Location: India
WE: Engineering (Manufacturing)
CAT Tests
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 11:02
5
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 25 Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities,

(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities,

(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and

(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained,

(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities,

NOTE: IN YOUR ANSWER, PLEASE STATE THE MEANING OF THE QUESTION IN YOUR OWN WORDS.


The best or excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.


Meaning:

The author is saying that despite Auden's contempt for gossip, he himself was a habitual literary gossiper.

This is a tricky one. Here "For all" is used in place of "despite". So from the options, a word that shows contrast would be a right fit to start the sentence. For eg. for all his talent,he lost the match under pressure.

In (B), "Having" does not show the contrast between the two clauses.

In (C), "And" implies a continuation of an idea, not a contrast. Plus, this is just way too wordy and convoluted.

In (D), the sentence feels incomplete. "Disdained" by whom? This choice changes the sentence's meaning by not explaining that it was Auden who disdained the activities.

In (E), "In spite of" does show the necessary contrast, but "professions of disdaining" is awkward.

A seems to be the most correct answer out of the lot. Although "disdain of" is not used in written english, the meaning of the sentence is the key here to select the answer. The gerund form doesn't tell us about the contrast. If option (B) were to say "Despite having always professed disdain for such activities," then it would have been the correct choice.

Please correct me if I'm wrong :)


Edit: Here's a list of important prepositions. Although this is for TOEFL (90% of prepositions present on the TOEFL are in this list), this will be very helpful for GMAT as well. Won't take much of your time :)
Attachments

Important prepositions.docx [15.25 KiB]
Downloaded 25 times

To download please login or register as a user

General Discussion
Director
Director
avatar
S
Joined: 21 Mar 2016
Posts: 521
Reviews Badge
Re: For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 09:37
IMO B,,
the underlined portion should modify auden and should be a subordinate clause...
B does that well
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Sep 2018
Posts: 43
CAT Tests
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 10:17
+B

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities, - Disdain of is incorrect , it has to be disdain for

(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities, - Having professed is modifying Auden correctly and is keeping the meaning of the sentence intact ( the sarcastic contrast of the sentence is well kept)

(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and - this and is like an addition , Auden professed gossiping was disdained ( passive ) and he was a gossip himself . the feel of the sentence is lost here.

(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained, - This would mean that act of professing and gossiping were happening at the same time ( in one sentence he was disdaining gossiping and in the other he was gossiping - how strange)

(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities, - This is taking the sentence to a different world altogether , meaning wise, to a very unorganised world at that .


Please correct me if i am wrong
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 01 Nov 2018
Posts: 18
CAT Tests
Re: For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 10:33
Chose A originally, then changed to B. Forgot A had wrong idiom. Disdain for not of...

Thankfully, this isn’t the official GMAT!

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 357
Location: Germany
Concentration: General Management, Finance
GPA: 3.6
WE: Analyst (Transportation)
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 11:14
Actually, I would go with A on this one.

In my opinion, it is the only answer choice that gets the meaning right.

Although Auden always professed disdain for such activities, he was an inveterate literary gossip nonetheless.

In case my answer choice is wrong, please let me know where I went off the path.

Regards,
Chris
_________________

A couple of things that helped me in verbal:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/verbal-strategies-268700.html#p2082192

Gmat Prep CAT #1: V42, Q34, 630
Gmat Prep CAT #2: V46, Q35, 660
Gmat Prep CAT #3: V41, Q42, 680

On the mission to improve my quant score, all help is appreciated! :)

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Feb 2018
Posts: 15
Re: For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2018, 13:21
I’m gonna go with E even though “of professions of disdaining” is bit awkward


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 2201
Premium Member CAT Tests
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Dec 2018, 15:04
4
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 25 Sentence Correction (SC1)



For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

(A) For all his professed disdain of such activities,
(B) Having always professed disdain for such activities,
(C) All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and
(D) Professing that all such activities were disdained,
(E) In spite of professions of disdaining all such activities,

OFFICIAL EXPLANATION
I make comments in blue typeface.

• Choice A is the best answer and is idiomatically phrased
Why? Is "disdain of" idiomatic? Or "For all"?

• Choice B fails to express the sense that Auden indulged in literary gossip [participated in literary gossip, DID gossip]
despite [his] professing disdain for it.
Why does B fail to express this sense?

• Choices C, D, and E do not establish precisely that Auden was the one professing disdain for literary gossip.
[Okay, so if "disdain of" is idiomatic, why does this author use "disdain for"?]

• The and in C makes the disembodied professions of disdain and the indulgence in gossip seem like wholly separate matters
How does this writer glean from the actual words in answer C that "such activities" are "professions of disdain"?

•E is especially awkward
Why? More awkward than C? Which is more awkward, a sentence that makes no sense, or a sentence
that uses a lot of words but makes sense?

COMMENTS
First, NCRanjan , a belated welcome to GMAT Club!

Second, this question is hard.
If you have been reading newspapers and journals, ahem,
then you will have seen "disdain for" a lot more often than "disdain of,"
a fact that was true when this question was written.

So this question forces you to choose between what most people believe is idiomatic,
and meaning.

Always choose meaning.

This question is similar to a very good MGMAT question about acai berries.
That question, in turn, was based on an official question about Elizabeth Barrett Browning. (linked in the post)

In the correct answer to the Browning question, GMAC violated what people thought was a well-established pronoun rule sometimes called "possessive poison."

Choosing the option closest to logical meaning in both the Browning and acai berry questions is only way to get the correct answer.

We have a similar issue.
I have seen "disdain of" about ten times.
I have seen "disdain for" hundreds of times.
I have seen disdain without any preposition hundreds of times.
(Because she disdained insincerity, she noticed that her colleague's actions contradicted his seemingly humble words.)

We have to ignore idioms.

I ask people to write the meaning of the sentence in their own words because 40 percent of SC
questions turn on meaning ("logical predication").
This question cannot be answered correctly without a solid understanding that the sentence
intends to convey a contradiction (contrast, irony).

Meaning?
Prateekj05 wrote:
"[D]espite Auden's contempt for gossip, he himself was a habitual literary gossiper."
Excellent.
Arro44 (Chris) wrote:
"Although Auden always professed disdain for such activities, he was an inveterate literary gossip nonetheless."
Excellent.
Both authors are wisely stubborn about meaning.

Here is meaning in the plainest English I can muster:
Although Auden often announced that he did not like gossiping, he gossiped constantly. He was a hypocrite.

Now, the options.

Option A uses "for" in the sense of "despite," as Prateekj05 notes. (Thanks for attaching the download! Very thoughtful. :-)).

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
Option A means: despite having spoken disdainfully about literary gossip, Auden himself was an incurable literary gossip.
Bingo.

Option B) Having always professed disdain for such activities, Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.

If we had not seen option A, we would read this sentence and think, "Huh?" Watch:
Having announced frequently that he despised the color olive green, he wore an olive green tie every day.

After we read the first part of the sentence, we expect something such as "he absolutely refused to wear olive green-colored ties."

(B) does not have contrast word such as "nonetheless" or "hypocritically" in the non-underlined portion of the sentence.

As such, we have no idea in B what meaning is intended.

"Having always" sets us up to expect that Auden was not a gossip.
Which part of this sentence is accurate?

This option is not logical.
GMAC hopes we will mentally insert a contrast word into this option.
Illogically connected sentences do not convey contradiction in a way that makes sense.
They convey confusion. Option B at best is confusing.

Option C says All such activities were, he professed, disdained, and Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
The author of the OE assumes that "such activities" refers to "professions of disdain" for "literary gossip,"
but this sentence says no such thing.

Option C, rewritten: Auden professed that he disdained "all such activities," and Auden was an inveterate literary gossip.
This horribly constructed sentence does not convey intended meaning; "such activities" could be anything, and there is no contrast word
to establish a clear linkage to Auden's hypocrisy.

Option D, while not horribly constructed, has the same errors as C. "Such activities" could be anything, and there is no contrast word.

Option E is poorly constructed, and it, too, does not have a word that signals contradiction. "Such activities" could be anything.

dave13 stepped in to help, as I have see some of you begin to do ( :thumbup: ), and provided a much-needed laugh (thank you!).

Prateekj05 wrote the best answer.
He and Arro44 rightly chose to insist that meaning must be clear and as intended.

That decision is not an easy one to make.
Takeaway: if only one option clearly conveys logical meaning,
even if that option seems weird or odd, choose that one.

I appreciate all the posters. This question is hard.
GMAT Club Bot
For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an &nbs [#permalink] 02 Dec 2018, 15:04
Display posts from previous: Sort by

For all his professed disdain of such activities, Auden was an

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.