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Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr

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Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr  [#permalink]

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Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.


A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits

B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits

D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits
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New post 21 Aug 2018, 23:34
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Max.MayankG wrote:
Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.


A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit , making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits
FATAL: antioxidants are compared to fruit, and the logic is absurd* (see option C)

B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available
FATAL: them is a plural pronoun that is supposed to refer to the singular noun "berry," and the logic is absurd (see option C)*

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits
FATAL: COMMA + WHICH may NOT refer to an entire clause, or to a verb (demonstrate).
Options A, B, and C convey absurd meaning. Results of studies are information. Information does not cause a fruit to be healthy.*

D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available. Correct. The construction may be unfamiliar, but compared to the other answers, whose errors are known to be absolutely incorrect, this option is better. It does not contain such errors. It makes sense.

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits
FATAL: plural pronoun THEY may not refer to singular noun "acai berry."

*Unsound logic: Options A, B, and C contain absurd logic ("logical predication" per OAs).
Study results do not cause a fruit to be healthy. What causes this fruit to be healthy? Extremely effective antioxidants. Now we have D and E. No contest.

There are no typos in this question. The correct answer is D.

I. The widely held belief that a pronoun may not refer to a possessive noun ("possessive poison") is not correct for the GMAT.
In particular, GMAC will allow a subject or object pronoun to refer to a possessive noun.


A decade ago, GMAC mentioned the rule once in an OE. Even in that case, the two options were eliminated for other reasons. GMAC has never mentioned the "rule" again. Further, GMAC has published questions whose correct answers violate the alleged rule.

This Manhattan Prep question resembles an official question about the poet E. B. Browning in which the subject pronoun "she" refers to a possessive noun. That pronoun referent startled many in the industry who doubted that GMAC would tolerate such a construction. The question and the issue have created confusion.

Max.MayankG , arvindsiv , lary301254M7 , AkshdeepS - though incorrect, your reasoning resembles that of many test takers. A decent bit of research is required to recognize that my answers in blue are correct.

That said, this question is instructive in this regard: use POE. Eliminate options with errors that have no exceptions.
You will end up with what you think is the "least" wrong answer.
That situation may not satisfy you, but it is the only way to handle SC questions in which a rule about which you are unclear arises.

Fatal errors in this case: Option A compares antioxidants to fruit; Options B and E contain pronoun disagreement (plural/singular); Option C misuses COMMA WHICH; and options A, B, and C are logically absurd.

Comments about the "possessive poison" rule -
Quote:
• OA is D but I believe "it" is used incorrectly in this choice. Any comments? As long as meaning is clear, GMAC allows a pronoun to have a possessive noun as an antecedent.

• In choice D "it" refers back to possessive "berry's". That cannot be correct. The pairing of "it" with the antecedent "berry's" CAN be correct on the GMAT.

• D is incorrect - acai berry was never mentioned in the earlier part of the sentence, therefore, "it" cannot refer back to the fruit. "It" can and does refer to the fruit. The antecedent of "it" is the possessive noun, "berry's."

• Not satisfied with the OA. There may be a typo. Possessive noun "acai berry’s antioxidants" can't work as an antecedent to "it". There is no typo. The possessive noun "berry's" can be the antecedent of "it."

Rules that seem ironclad aren't always so. That circumstance can be very frustrating.

II. The content of the infamous (and apparently perishable) poison possessive rule on the GMAT

According to the "rule," subject and object pronouns cannot refer to a possessive noun.

Some grammarians still hold firmly to that rule.

More than a decade ago, however, GMAC advertised that it would not follow the rule strictly in the OBJECT pronoun case (her, him, them).

GMAC used the question HERE as early as 2007 in which an OBJECT pronoun referred to a possessive noun.

That link leads to a recent Question of the Day, in which the awesome and awesomely funny GMATNinja did not need to discuss whether "her" could refer to the possessive noun in "the goddess Bona Dea's" because the phrase in question was not underlined and every option contained only "her."

GMAC's maneuver at that point was equivalent to a statement that object pronouns COULD refer to possessive nouns.
A handful of similar official questions reinforced that message about object pronoun referents.

Whether GMAC ever subscribed strictly to the "poison pronoun" rule in the SUBJECT pronoun case is not clear.
In 2005 or 2006, apparently on a GMAT paper test, a possessive noun was allowed to stand for a subject pronoun:

Frances Wright's book on America contrasted the republicanism of the United States with what she saw as the aristocratic and corrupt institutions of England.

This one example on paper likely was seen by very few and did not dissolve a fairly steadfast consensus.
Until recently, many GMAT instructors believed that GMAC would not allow a subject pronoun to refer to a possessive noun.

In 2016, however, the OG contained a question about Elizabeth Barrett Browning's poetry, HERE.

That is, in SC #138 of OG 2016, GMAC tipped its hand on the issue of a subject pronoun referent.
CORRECT: Although Elizabeth Barrett Browning's success was later overshadowed by that of her husband, among her contemporaries SHE was considered the better poet.

GMAT instructors took note. Many of them observed that GMAC had "relaxed" its stance. At the least, GMAC had established that a subject pronoun COULD refer to a possessive antecedent.

I do not think GMAC staged a revolution.

I think GMAC test writers signaled that as long as the meaning of the sentence is clear, a pronoun can refer to a possessive noun.
In the EBB case just above, for example, there is only one woman to whom "she" can refer, namely, Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

The E.B. Browning question was not a mistake. The question continued to appear in OGs 2017, 2018, and 2019 (SC #805).

Conclusion? Note the shift and adjust your thinking just a little. We do not automatically reject an option based on what has often seemed like a rule without exceptions.

III. Excellent sources may be wrong about this issue.

Expert sources who say that pronouns cannot refer to possessive nouns are not the same people who write the GMAT.

With respect to the GMAT, the blanket possessive poison prohibition is incorrect.
Typically such sources add one exception, namely, that possessive pronouns such as "her" can refer to possessive nouns such as "Mary's."

In a conflict between an official and a non-official source, the official source wins.

The most recent edition of a book by a very popular and well-respected source for GMAT sentence correction
is not accurate about what GMAC allows and forbids in this context.
See, for example, pages 119 and 194 of the latest edition.
(That book deserves its stellar reputation. A few inaccuracies? Eh.)

Sources on the web? Same deal. On the GMAT,
the "rule" that a possessive noun cannot be the antecedent of a pronoun, as this popular website asserts, HERE, is not absolute. The rule may not be a rule at all.

I emphasize "on the GMAT" because some sources that are more traditional than GMAC adhere to the prohibition.

IV. Summary
On the GMAT, as long as meaning is clear, both object and subject pronouns may have a possessive noun as an antecedent.
Correct: Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

Answer D

P.S. "Logical predication" (meaning and causality) in Options A, B, and C, as I wrote below, is nonsensical at worst and iffy at best.

Study results cannot "cause" a fruit to be among "the healthiest" of available fruits. Antioxidants can. See my comments in that post.
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New post 05 Jul 2018, 12:40
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Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Is this really from MGMAT as tagged? No choice is correct.

A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits--- Faulty comparison of antioxidants with any other fruit.


B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available--- 'them' has no reference; if 'them' is referring to the antioxidants, then it is absurd.

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits-- No referent for which; it is the boosting that makes the fruit worthwhile.


D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available-- 1. It cannot refer to the possessive acai berry's 2. We require 'do' after 'than', as 'boost' is the verbal action that is under comparison.

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost[/color] immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits--- No referent for 'they'.

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New post 11 Jul 2018, 00:23
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D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is //one of the healthiest fruits// that ((is)) widely available - how is the usage of singular verb correct for this structure. Only because of this part I eliminated D and went for E.

The correct usage always should be - it is one of the healthiest fruits that are widely available.

For eg. He is one those people who //like// to stay out at night. - correct

He is one those people who ((likes)) to stay out at night. - incorrect.

Please Daagh provide the clarification.



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Re: Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2018, 10:16
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There is a similar question in OG 17 where a subject pronoun can refer to possessive noun.
https://gmatclub.com/forum/although-she-was-considered-among-her-contemporaries-to-be-the-better-208881.html
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New post 31 Jul 2018, 10:53
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sonal
I agree.
One of the healthiest widely available fruits is acai-- ok
One of the healthiest widely available fruits are acai -- not ok
One of the healthiest widely available fruits that are available - ok
One of the healthiest widely available fruits that is available - not ok
The presence of the relative pronoun 'that' makes the vital difference.
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New post 18 Aug 2018, 11:44
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daagh wrote:
Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Is this really from MGMAT as tagged? No choice is correct.

A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits--- Faulty comparison of antioxidants with any other fruit.


B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available--- 'them' has no reference; if 'them' is referring to the antioxidants, then it is absurd.

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits-- No referent for which; it is the boosting that makes the fruit worthwhile.


D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available-- 1. It cannot refer to the possessive acai berry's 2. We require 'do' after 'than', as 'boost' is the verbal action that is under comparison.

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost[/color] immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits--- No referent for 'they'.



Hi daagh sir,
Why in Option A we cant assume "antioxidants found in" to be present in the second half of the comparison - concept of ellipsis .
and in that case IMO comparison would be proper.


Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits
Thanks in advance.

Regards,
Tamal
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New post 25 Aug 2018, 10:35
IMO C is the correct answer

A- Compares antioxidants in acai berry to other fruits. Hence wrong
B - Same as A
C- Correct, though wordy
D- Makes an absolute statement that açai is indeed one of the healthiest fruits without referring to the reliance on recent studies in coming to this conclusion (mentioned in the original question)
E- Same as D

What is the OA?
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New post 25 Aug 2018, 11:59
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Max.MayankG wrote:
Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.


A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits

B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits

D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits

nehalmashtom wrote:
IMO C is the correct answer

A- Compares antioxidants in acai berry to other fruits. Hence wrong
B - Same as A
C- Correct, though wordy
D- Makes an absolute statement that açai is indeed one of the healthiest fruits without referring to the reliance on recent studies in coming to this conclusion (mentioned in the original question)
E- Same as D

What is the OA?

Attachment:
wheretofindtheOA.PNG
wheretofindtheOA.PNG [ 46.71 KiB | Viewed 3308 times ]

nehalmashtom , you can find the OA in the original post. Peek under the spoiler.

The answer is D.

I am not sure why you think D must refer to "recent studies."

1) If nearly an entire sentence is underlined, the options often will present different ways to express everything in the underlined portion.
In this case, the two formulations form a 3-2 split

2) Perhaps you believe that the first sentence, Option A, sets the tone or must be replicated in some nearly identical fashion?
No. There is no such rule.


Answer C is not correct. It has at least two problems. One, its use of "comma which" is incorrect. Two, the causality is nonsensical at worst, iffy at best.

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Comma WHICH
With very few exceptions, COMMA + WHICH must refer to a noun, pronoun, or, occasionally, a noun phrase ("houses for sale").
In (C), the "which" incorrectly refers to the preceding entire clause, i.e., "Recent studies have shown . . ."

To correct (C), we would need to paraphrase that whole first independent clause into a noun or pronoun and substitute "that" for "which."

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, [a discovery that] makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Causality
The corrected version of the sentence does not alter the causality problems in the original.

The Results of recent studies . . . do not MAKE the acai berry one of the healthiest fruits . . .
Study results do not make the fruit superior to other fruits.

The antioxidants in the fruit itself make the fruit superior to other fruits -- make it one of the healthiest available.
Those antioxidants are more effective at boosting immune cell function than antioxidants in almost all other fruits.
The special characteristics of X make X distinguishable from other . . .

Logically better:
Because X has special characteristics that are beneficial to a greater degree than those in other fruits, X is superior to other fruits.
Because X, Y

Now we are down to D and E.
Option E has pronoun/noun disagreement. "They are" should be "it is." The pronoun refers to a berry, not to berries.

Hope that helps.
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New post 26 Aug 2018, 07:32
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generis wrote:
Max.MayankG wrote:
Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.


A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits

B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits

D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits

nehalmashtom wrote:
IMO C is the correct answer

A- Compares antioxidants in acai berry to other fruits. Hence wrong
B - Same as A
C- Correct, though wordy
D- Makes an absolute statement that açai is indeed one of the healthiest fruits without referring to the reliance on recent studies in coming to this conclusion (mentioned in the original question)
E- Same as D

What is the OA?

Attachment:
wheretofindtheOA.PNG

nehalmashtom , you can find the OA in the original post. Peek under the spoiler.

The answer is D.

I am not sure why you think D must refer to "recent studies."

1) If nearly an entire sentence is underlined, the options often will present different ways to express everything in the underlined portion.
In this case, the two formulations form a 3-2 split

2) Perhaps you believe that the first sentence, Option A, sets the tone or must be replicated in some nearly identical fashion?
No. There is no such rule.


Answer C is not correct. It has at least two problems. One, its use of "comma which" is incorrect. Two, the causality is nonsensical at worst, iffy at best.

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Comma WHICH
With very few exceptions, COMMA + WHICH must refer to a noun, pronoun, or, occasionally, a noun phrase ("houses for sale").
In (C), the "which" incorrectly refers to the preceding entire clause, i.e., "Recent studies have shown . . ."

To correct (C), we would need to paraphrase that whole first independent clause into a noun or pronoun and substitute "that" for "which."

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, [a discovery that] makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

Causality
The corrected version of the sentence does not alter the causality problems in the original.

The Results of recent studies . . . do not MAKE the acai berry one of the healthiest fruits . . .
Study results do not make the fruit superior to other fruits.

The antioxidants in the fruit itself make the fruit superior to other fruits -- make it one of the healthiest available.
Those antioxidants are more effective at boosting immune cell function than antioxidants in almost all other fruits.
The special characteristics of X make X distinguishable from other . . .

Logically better:
Because X has special characteristics that are beneficial to a greater degree than those in other fruits, X is superior to other fruits.
Because X, Y

Now we are down to D and E.
Option E has pronoun/noun disagreement. "They are" should be "it is." The pronoun refers to a berry, not to berries.

Hope that helps.


hi generis, though D is correct answer do you feel the way the sentence is structured is okay ? i mean the style :-)

Normally when i hear "because" in conversations ... i expect and I hear something before because .... "because' mostly is proceeded by some words e.g. "i dont like pizza with mushrooms because i dont like mushrooms" :)
i think in spoken language i emphasize more on the inner meaning of my thoughts rather than grammatical aspects :)

Because :hurt: the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available
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New post 26 Aug 2018, 09:48
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This is a kind of unusual question from the stable of MGMAT.
The original text says that recent studies have shown something about the acai berry. Choices B and C also carry that fact. However, in D and E, the recent study part has been dropped altogether and it looks as if MGMAT has hijacked the thesis from the studies and presented as its own.

Can we drop a part of the original proposition thus in a GMAT question?
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New post 27 Aug 2018, 20:40
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dave13 wrote:
hi generis, though D is correct answer do you feel the way the sentence is structured is okay ? i mean the style :-)

Normally when i hear "because" in conversations ... i expect and I hear something before because .... "because' mostly is proceeded by some words e.g. "i dont like pizza with mushrooms because i dont like mushrooms" :)
i think in spoken language i emphasize more on the inner meaning of my thoughts rather than grammatical aspects :)

Because :hurt: the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

dave13 , you ask a good question.

I imagine that "because" at the beginning of a sentence sounds odd because that construction is rare.
In language, familiarity does not breed contempt. In language, familiarity breeds comfort.

You have a good ear that would catch awkward construction. Few people can master a "because in the beginning" structure whether in uttered or written form.

This writer could:

Because I am a woman, I must make unusual efforts to succeed. If I fail, no one will say, "She doesn't have what it takes,"' They will say, "Women don't have what it takes."
-- Claire Booth Luce

Finally, how we understand causality in any language ranks near the top in "important areas to master." We see the construction rarely, we hear the construction rarely, and when we do, it's not usually well said or well written.

• How AND, BUT, and OR -- and BECAUSE -- got banished for no reason

Very often native English speakers (and perhaps non-native speakers) encounter at least one teacher who announces that sentences must never begin with conjunctions.

The "rule" pertains to the coordinating conjunctions AND, BUT, and OR.

No such rule exists, although its contents still circulate.
The Chicago Manual of Style calls this rule a "myth."

Good writers have always ignored the non-rule.

Despite the fact that "because" is a subordinating and not a coordinating conjunction, "because" was also banished to the Land of Words that Should Never Begin a Sentence.
Yep. We were taught not to begin sentences with "because."
That prohibition also still circulates.

There is no such rule about "because," either.
There is not even a "stylistic preference" for the placement of because.

GMAT?
A quick and informal survey indicates that GMAC includes at least one question that starts with because in its OGs and Verbal Reviews.
• Verbal Review 2018, SC 229 (collagen fibers);
• 2012 OG (13th edition): SC 33 (oversupply of computer chips) and SC 115 (maritime provisions)
• 2016 OG: SC 67 (oversupply of computer chips) and SC 115 (maritime provisions)
• 2018 OG SC 779 (maritime provisions)

In answer to your question: no, I don't like the style (the syntax) of the sentence, but I do think it is well-constructed to test the concept.
Try rewriting the sentence without that structure. See whether you can construct a sentence as efficient as that one with all those words.

One takeaway: If you see "because" begin a sentence, be prepared to assess whether there is a subordinate clause (because . . .A, B, C) and a main clause (X happened or Y is true).

Another takeaway: Some sentences are richer with "because at the beginning." This is one of those sentences ("think" it in English, a suggestion that sounds absurd, but I believe you will understand):

Because we have little use for history, and because we refuse the comforts of a society established on the blueprint of class privilege, we find ourselves set adrift at birth in an existential void, inheriting nothing except the obligation to construct a plausible self . . .
-- Lewis H. Lapham, Who and What is an American?

"Because" at the beginning makes the last phrase strike with eerily beautiful force: "inheriting nothing except the obligation to construct a plausible self."

Final takeaway: the awkwardness of the construction caught many people asleep on the issue of meaning, and in particular on the issue of absurd causality in A, B, and C. Heads up, everyone. :-)
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Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2018, 20:51
daagh wrote:
This is a kind of unusual question from the stable of MGMAT.
The original text says that recent studies have shown something about the acai berry. Choices B and C also carry that fact. However, in D and E, the recent study part has been dropped altogether and it looks as if MGMAT has hijacked the thesis from the studies and presented as its own.

Can we drop a part of the original proposition thus in a GMAT question?

daagh , I think you are asking whether the sentence must follow whatever meaning is conveyed by option A (because option A replicates the sentence in the original prompt).

If that is the question: no, we do not have to follow the meaning in the original prompt. We can "drop a part of the original proposition," even though MGMAT looks as if it "hijacked the thesis from the studies," as you wrote with typical dry wit.

The belief that option A sets the pace is an urban legend with a worldwide trail.
I knew that the alleged rule was false, but I am not sure how I knew; the fact had never been formally confirmed.

In another thread, the legendary MartyMurray rightly scorched the reasoning in the official-ish answer to a question not published by GMAC.

In that question, the person writing the OA asserted that option C -- grammatically just as good as or better than Option A -- should be eliminated because its meaning was different from that of option A.
Quote:
Notice how answer option C changes the meaning of the original sentence. 'Likely' is not the same as 'most likely'. So, you can eliminate C.

The highlighted portion of the above official explanation for this question is based on a myth. The myth is that the meaning conveyed by the sentence created via the use of the correct answer to a GMAT Sentence Correction question has to match the meaning conveyed by the original sentence, i.e., the version created via the use of choice A.

There is no such rule.

So, yes, we can drop as much of a prompt as is warranted.
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Re: Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 15:21
Max.MayankG wrote:
Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.


A. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits

B. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

C. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits

D. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

E. Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits


Official Solution (Credit: Manhattan Prep)



(1) Take a First Glance (5 seconds)

The underline is fairly long, so expect some answers to change up the Sentence Structure. Recent studies and Because the acai berry are both are valid ways to begin a sentence; because indicates a causal relationship, so Meaning may come into play



(2) Read for Meaning

The sentence is trying to make a comparison: the antioxidants in the acai berry boost immune cell function more than the antioxidants in any other fruit boost immune cell function. In fact, though, the sentence says that the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more than any other fruit. Antioxidants should be compared to other antioxidants rather than to fruit.



(3) Find a Starting Point

Start with any difference that seems easiest to you, then move to the next easiest issue, and so on. Stop when you have one answer or you aren’t sure how to address the remaining differences. All errors for each choice are detailed in the next section.



(4) Eliminate (and Repeat)

(A) This answer compares antioxidants to fruit; the correct comparison is antioxidants to other antioxidants.

(B) This answer compares antioxidants to fruit; the correct comparison is antioxidants to other anti-oxidants. Further, the plural pronoun them incorrectly refers back to the singular noun the acai berry.

(C) This answer correctly compares antioxidants to antioxidants (the pronoun those stands in for antioxidants, here), but it introduces an incorrect modifier. Comma-which is a noun modifier, and it must modify the preceding main noun. In this answer, the which modifier would have to refer to other fruit or those (the antioxidants in the other fruit), neither of which is the reason that the acai berry is one of the healthiest fruits.

(D) CORRECT. This answer correctly compares antioxidants to antioxidants (the pronoun those stands in for antioxidants, here), and it properly uses the singular pronoun it to refer to the singular noun the acai berry. While one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available is less concise than one of the healthiest widely available fruits, either construction is acceptable (avoid eliminating answers based on concision).

(E) This answer correctly compares antioxidants to antioxidants, but it incorrectly uses the plural pronoun they to refer to the singular noun the acai berry.
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Re: Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berr &nbs [#permalink] 20 Sep 2018, 15:21
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