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jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance


Sentence presents two facts about JB-
1) To JB, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
2) she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

Structure: Noun phrase, clause1 and clause2.
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate[/u], and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

JB is the subject of both the parts. "and" indicates parallelism and for meaning clarity, these clauses should be parallel. In other words, the subject pronoun "she" should refer to the subject noun of the preceding clause and hence JB should be the subject of the first clause.

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate- JB should be the subject of the former clause

'her' is redundant.


B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home- JB should be the subject of the former clause

Structure: noun phrase, modifier, clause 1 and clause 2 - placement of introductory elements is bad


C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable

Structure: Clause 1 modifier and clause 2

The construction is reversed.


D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

Structure: Modifier, Clause 1 and Clause 2- Looks good!



E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker- JB should be the subject of the former clause


Hope this helps!
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Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

(A) To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate

(B) For Josephine Baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Paris was her home

(C) Josephine Baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable

(D) Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

(E) Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker


Concepts tested here: Parallelism + Verb Forms + Awkwardness/Redundancy

• For referring to the purpose or intent of an action, the infinitive verb form (“to + base form of verb" – “to + be” in this sentence) is preferred over the present participle ("verb+ing" - "being" in this sentence) construction.
• Any elements linked by a conjunction ("and" in this case) must be parallel.

A: This answer choice fails to maintain parallelism between "Paris was her home..." and "she remained in France..."; remember, any elements linked by a conjunction ("and" in this case) must be parallel. Further, Option A uses the needlessly wordy and indirect construction "To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home", leading to awkwardness and redundancy.

B: This answer choice fails to maintain parallelism between "Paris was her home" and "she remained in France..."; remember, any elements linked by a conjunction ("and" in this case) must be parallel. Further, Option B uses the needlessly wordy and indirect construction "For Josephine Baker...Paris was her home", leading to awkwardness and redundancy.

C: This answer choice uses the passive and needlessly indirect construction "long before to be an expatriate was fashionable", leading to awkwardness and redundancy.

D: Correct. This answer choice correctly maintains parallelism between "Josephine Baker made Paris her home" and "she remained in France...". Further, Option D uses the infinitive verb form ("to + base form of verb" - "to + be" in this case) to refer to the intent of the action "it was fashionable". Additionally, Option D is free of any awkwardness or redundancy.

E: This answer choice uses the present participle ("verb+ing" - "being" in this sentence) to refer to the intent of the action "it was fashionable"; remember, for referring to the purpose/intent of an action, the infinitive verb form ("to + base form of verb") is preferred over the present participle ("verb+ing"). Further, Option E uses the needlessly indirect clause "Paris was home to Josephine Baker", leading to awkwardness and redundancy.

Hence, D is the best answer choice.

All the best!
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Two independent sentences are coordinated using “and”. The subject of the second sentence “She” and it would be clear if the Subject of the first sentence clarifies “She”.

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate [ Paris … and She … not clear and Parallel – eliminate it]
B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home [ Paris … and She … not clear and Parallel – eliminate it]
C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate [o be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate – awkward – eliminate it]
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home [Hold it]
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker [ Paris … and She … not clear and Parallel – eliminate it]

Answer: D
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WHY C is wrong?

og explains that C is wrong because the inversion is aukward.

I infer that "to do " as subject is not prefered

and

it is+ adjective+ to do

is prefered.

is my thinking correct?, experts, please,explain this point.
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vietmoi999 wrote:
WHY C is wrong?

og explains that C is wrong because the inversion is aukward.

I infer that "to do " as subject is not prefered

and

it is+ adjective+ to do

is prefered.

is my thinking correct?, experts, please,explain this point.


To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

if you fit option C in sentence:

C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate,and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance
is that sounds correct.
before it was fashionable to be an expatriate was fashinable expatriate.

i think clause cannot be the object of a sentence.
moreover an expatriate was fashinable expatriate==>this is completely awkward too.

about your doubt can you please elaborate what you wanted to say.


thanks
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jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home
C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker


Betweem B and D:

B) "For Josephine.. Paris was her home" just doesn't sound right. We already know "her" refers to Josephine, and the addition of "her" in this place is just awkward. Also, the "for" in the beginning kind of distorts the intended meaning of the author.

D) First we're given an inessential clause, then Josephine is introduced and the rest of the underlined portion is parallel to "she remained in France" .. So D is correct
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freakygeek wrote:
Hi e-gmat,

I am wondering if there are any other others in this sentence except the one that OG has pointed out, that is 2 independent clauses when connected by ', and' are most clear when their subject is same.

Can you please help me here ? Also, In D answer choice since opening modifier is about Paris, doesnt it seem to be modifying 'Josephin Baker' rather than Paris ?


Hi there,

Thank you for posting your query here.

The parallelism error between the two clauses seems to be the only grammatical error in option A, but you can also see this as a meaning issue. The subject of the sentence should be Josephine Baker, since the main point of the sentence is to tell us something about her. This focus is lost when Paris is made the subject of the sentence.

Modifiers about time periods tell us when the subject performed an action; they don't describe the subject itself. This modifier could theoretically be replaced by a modifier such as the following: In 1940, Josephine Baker made Paris her home. Here, the time period doesn't have to tell us more about the subject; it merely tells us about the time in which she performed a certain action. The modifier in option D functions in pretty much the same way: it tells us when Baker made Paris her home.

I hope this helps to clarify your doubts!

Regards,
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jeetmech152 wrote:
Hi e-gmat,

Please explain what 'it' refers to in the opening modifier of correct choice.

and why ans choice C is incorrect.

Thanks,

Hi,

Thank you for your query. :)

I will certainly help you understand the correct choice and the use of “it” in the same. However, before I do that, I would like to request you to kindly provide me with your meaning and error analysis of the original sentence along with your analysis of the correct choice. If your answer is different from the OA, kindly include in your analysis the reasons for marking the alternate choice as the correct answer. Your analysis will help me in addressing not only this particular doubt but also any possible conceptual gap in your understanding. Hope you'll appreciate the same. :)

Regards,
Neeti.
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jeetmech152 wrote:
Hi e-gmat,

Please explain what 'it' refers to in the opening modifier of correct choice.

and why ans choice C is incorrect.

Thanks,

Hi,

Thank you for your query. :)

I will certainly help you understand the correct choice and the use of “it” in the same. However, before I do that, I would like to request you to kindly provide me with your meaning and error analysis of the original sentence along with your analysis of the correct choice. If your answer is different from the OA, kindly include in your analysis the reasons for marking the alternate choice as the correct answer. Your analysis will help me in addressing not only this particular doubt but also any possible conceptual gap in your understanding. Hope you'll appreciate the same. :)

Regards,
Neeti.


Hi Neeti,

Here is the analysis:

To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

Meaning: Long before a fashion to be an expatriate arrived, Josephine baker lived in paris(Which was her native place).
During WW2 she lived in France as a performer and an intelligence agent for the resistance.

Error analysis:
cl1: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate,and
cl2: She remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

S-V pairs are fine , Verb Tense--> All events in the sentence are properly set in the past, Pronoun-->in cl1 'it' is missing an antecedent., 'she' in cl2 clearly refers to J.B,
Modifier-->' Long before....expatriate' is correctly telling us abt when was paris home to J.B. ,
Parallelism-List in cl2 is parallel, No Idioms, Meaning is clear,
Others--> Her in cl1 is redundant , Subject of cl1 and that of cl2, which is not underlined, should refer to same entity i.e. J.B in this case, but the subject of cl1 is paris, which is an incorrect reference

POE:
A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate - Wrong: for the above mentioned reasons.
B. For Josephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Paris was her home - Wrong:This choice repeats the errors in choice A
C. Josephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable - Correct: All the errors in original choice are rectified.
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home - Wrong: Pronoun 'it' has no antecedent.
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker - wrong: J.B. should be subject of cl1, pronoun 'it' has no antecedent

With the analysis above, I selected choice C as the correct answer. However, the OA is choice D. Please let me know where did I falter in my analysis.
Thanks.
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souvik101990 wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance.

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate,

B. For Josephine Baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Paris was her home,

C. Josephine Baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable,

D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home,

E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker,



A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate -- Sort of passive arrangement, making Paris as the subject

B. For Josephine Baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Paris was her home -- redundant

C. Josephine Baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable -- distorts the meaning, wordy

D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home -- Correct

E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker -- Passive voice and use of being


Answer D
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I agree with paralelizm issue between SHE and JB. Now I think between answeres C and D.
Both are grammatically correct. But it is GMAt and we have to choose the one that sounds better.

The only differencу is TO BE AN E. WAS FASHIONABLE OR IT WAS FASHIONABLE TO BE AN E.
There is a rule: all the time I see the clause starts with INFINITIVE OR THAT- CLAUSE, I know grammatically the sentence is correct but I still look for a better sounded sentence with an IT prep in the beginning.
EX : To talk to Alesia is pleasure. correct grammatically. But better to say It is pleasure to talk to Alesia.
That Alesia is a member of gmatclub gives her an advantage. BETTER- it is an advantage her an advantage to be a member of gmatclub.

So, if You see think between two of these sentences choose the second one. If you have only one option- the first one- and other 4 choices are grammatically incorrect- choose the first option.

hope it helps
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable [#permalink]
I get the logic for why others are incorrect. However, with D, "Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance". Doesn't this make she redudant? Also, is made a complete verb in the first clause?


jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home
C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker
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jjindal wrote:
I get the logic for why others are incorrect. However, with D, "Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance". Doesn't this make she redudant? Also, is made a complete verb in the first clause?


jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home
C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker


Query 1:
No, "she" is required in the second clause. Notice the comma before "and". Comma + and separates two independent clauses. If the comma were not there, then "she" would be redundant -"and" without comma can join two verbs.

I play, and I sing.... correct.
I play and sing.... correct.
I play and I sing..... wrong.
I play, and sing. .....wrong.

Query 2:
Yes, "made" is a complete verb (simple past form of "make"). Why do you think there could be an issue with "made"?
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable [#permalink]
CrackVerbalGMAT wrote:
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance


Sentence presents two facts about JB-
1) To JB, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
2) she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

Structure: Noun phrase, clause1 and clause2.
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate[/u], and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

JB is the subject of both the parts. "and" indicates parallelism and for meaning clarity, these clauses should be parallel. In other words, the subject pronoun "she" should refer to the subject noun of the preceding clause and hence JB should be the subject of the first clause.

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate- JB should be the subject of the former clause

'her' is redundant.


B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home- JB should be the subject of the former clause

Structure: noun phrase, modifier, clause 1 and clause 2 - placement of introductory elements is bad


C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable

Structure: Clause 1 modifier and clause 2

The construction is reversed.


D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

Structure: Modifier, Clause 1 and Clause 2- Looks good!



E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker- JB should be the subject of the former clause


Hope this helps!
Dolly Sharma
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Hey!
Thanks for the above explanation. I agree with that. However, i don't understand what does "it" refers to in option D. Moreover, i think option D portrays "it" as "josephine Baker" (applying comma subject role). Will not that work here. If no, how will we make out when to apply comma subject rule and when to not.
Thanks
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ashutoshsh wrote:
CrackVerbalGMAT wrote:
jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance


Sentence presents two facts about JB-
1) To JB, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
2) she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

Structure: Noun phrase, clause1 and clause2.
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate[/u], and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

JB is the subject of both the parts. "and" indicates parallelism and for meaning clarity, these clauses should be parallel. In other words, the subject pronoun "she" should refer to the subject noun of the preceding clause and hence JB should be the subject of the first clause.

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate- JB should be the subject of the former clause

'her' is redundant.


B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home- JB should be the subject of the former clause

Structure: noun phrase, modifier, clause 1 and clause 2 - placement of introductory elements is bad


C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable

Structure: Clause 1 modifier and clause 2

The construction is reversed.


D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

Structure: Modifier, Clause 1 and Clause 2- Looks good!



E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker- JB should be the subject of the former clause


Hope this helps!
Dolly Sharma
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Hey!
Thanks for the above explanation. I agree with that. However, i don't understand what does "it" refers to in option D. Moreover, i think option D portrays "it" as "josephine Baker" (applying comma subject role). Will not that work here. If no, how will we make out when to apply comma subject rule and when to not.
Thanks


The pronoun "it" can be used as a placeholder. For a placeholder "it", no antecedent is required. Placeholder "it" refers to a subject or an object that needs to be moved in order to avoid awkwardness.

Example:
It is nice to see you.
The meaning is: To see you is nice. But the usage is awkward and hence the infinite subject "to see you" is moved to the end of the sentence. However its place is held using the placeholder "it".

It is good that you came.
Place holder "it" is used to hold the place of "that you came".

Similarly in option D, placeholder "it" is used to hold the position of "to be an expatriate"
The meaning is: To be an expatriate was fashionable.
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OreoShake wrote:
Dont really get why C is wrong, to me it felt unidiomatic but no real grammer issues. 'to be an expatriate' acts as a noun and should be correct as well.

Any comment is appreciated.


If you recollect the use of "placeholder IT", then you would probably realize why C is awkward.

It is fashionable to be expatriate... correct ( The placeholder "it" replaces "to be expatriate").

The placeholder is used to eliminate the awkwardness in the following sentence:
To be an expatriate is fashionable... awkward.
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable [#permalink]
Hello,

Could someone specify how D is correct given the way that the last words before the comma split come together? I feel that "and she remained in France" does not match with the first sentence (before the comma) in D.

Any insight would be great! :)

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