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To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable

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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2017, 06:06
2
OreoShake wrote:
Dont really get why C is wrong, to me it felt unidiomatic but no real grammer issues. 'to be an expatriate' acts as a noun and should be correct as well.

Any comment is appreciated.


If you recollect the use of "placeholder IT", then you would probably realize why C is awkward.

It is fashionable to be expatriate... correct ( The placeholder "it" replaces "to be expatriate").

The placeholder is used to eliminate the awkwardness in the following sentence:
To be an expatriate is fashionable... awkward.
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2019, 05:34
Hello,

Could someone specify how D is correct given the way that the last words before the comma split come together? I feel that "and she remained in France" does not match with the first sentence (before the comma) in D.

Any insight would be great! :)

KHow
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2019, 06:04
1
KHow wrote:
Hello,

Could someone specify how D is correct given the way that the last words before the comma split come together? I feel that "and she remained in France" does not match with the first sentence (before the comma) in D.

Any insight would be great! :)

KHow
If you're asking whether the structures are similar, this is what the and does in option D:

Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home,
and
she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance.


The and joins two clauses here ("JB made..." and "she remained...").
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2019, 00:39
sayantanc2k wrote:
jjindal wrote:
I get the logic for why others are incorrect. However, with D, "Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance". Doesn't this make she redudant? Also, is made a complete verb in the first clause?


jimmyjamesdonkey wrote:
To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, and she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance

A. To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate
B. For Joshephine baker, long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, paris was her home
C. Joshephine baker made Paris her home long before to be an expatriate was fashionable expatriate
D. Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home
E. Long before it was fashionable being an expatriate, Paris was home to Josephine Baker


Query 1:
No, "she" is required in the second clause. Notice the comma before "and". Comma + and separates two independent clauses. If the comma were not there, then "she" would be redundant -"and" without comma can join two verbs.

I play, and I sing.... correct.
I play and sing.... correct.
I play and I sing..... wrong.
I play, and sing. .....wrong.

Query 2:
Yes, "made" is a complete verb (simple past form of "make"). Why do you think there could be an issue with "made"?


I dont think so
if there is no "she" in choice D, the modifier "long before ..." will apply to both "made paris her home..." and "remained in France". this is not logic. the logic point is "long before..." apply to only "made paris her home...".

"and" can be used to limit the scale of a modifier.
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Re: To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2019, 01:38
AjiteshArun wrote:
KHow wrote:
Hello,

Could someone specify how D is correct given the way that the last words before the comma split come together? I feel that "and she remained in France" does not match with the first sentence (before the comma) in D.

Any insight would be great! :)

KHow
If you're asking whether the structures are similar, this is what the and does in option D:

Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home,
and
she remained in France during the Second World War as a performer and an intelligence agent for the Resistance.


The and joins two clauses here ("JB made..." and "she remained...").



Greetings AjiteshArun

I have second thoughts about the opening modifier in Option (D)

Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

The subject for the opening modifier should follow after the comma, and the correct subject seems to be "paris" not JB

Please add your thoughts
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To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2019, 19:53
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sakshamchhabra wrote:
Greetings AjiteshArun

I have second thoughts about the opening modifier in Option (D)

Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home

The subject for the opening modifier should follow after the comma, and the correct subject seems to be "paris" not JB

Please add your thoughts
Hi sakshamchhabra,

We do sometimes need to be careful about which noun we choose as the subject in such constructions. For example:

Long before it was discovered by scientists digging in sediments, the ancient burial site was used by a local tribe. ← Here the it points to the ancient burial site, which is the intended meaning.

Long before it was discovered by scientists digging in sediments, a local tribe used the ancient burial site. ← This sentence seems to be telling us that a local tribe was what the scientists discovered. This sentence is not as clear as the first one, and therefore we'd try not to mark this option.

In this question though, the it is not a problem.

Long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate... ← Here the it points to to be an expatriate. We can see that by asking ourselves what was fashionable. To be an expatriate was fashionable.

This means that we are not restricted in our choice of subject after the comma, as the it is not pointing to anything after the comma.

So "long before it was fashionable to be an expatriate, Josephine Baker made Paris her home" is fine. We don't need to make Paris the subject, as the it does not refer to Paris.
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To Josephine Baker, Paris was her home long before it was fashionable   [#permalink] 19 May 2019, 19:53

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