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A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may

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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2016, 06:59
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gmatlbs wrote:
I got the answer correct , but one quick query ....
Isn't "..., as a result,..."mentioned in choice B , hampering the parallelism?

I'm i correct in understanding that since "..., as a result,..." is mentioned within commas it is not impacting the parallelism.
Please help.


as a result is a modifier phrase, encapsulated in a pair of commas so yes it does not impact the parallelism,
it enhances the meaning of the second infinitive "to make" , establishing the cause - effect relationship between the two elements presented in parallel construction.
in fact, without "as a result" , these elements cannot be entirely parallel because they're not independent consequences that can be purely separated by "and" .

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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 12:19
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make
I always get these kind of questions wrong. I always end up making wrong things parallel..
In this case i did hampers with results ...

Can anyone please suggest how to improve on this one particular topic? How to find what parallels what? :oops:


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 13:10
1
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make
I always get these kind of questions wrong. I always end up making wrong things parallel..
In this case i did hampers with results ...

Can anyone please suggest how to improve on this one particular topic? How to find what parallels what? :oops:


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?


Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 18:55
sayantanc2k wrote:
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?



Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.


sayantanc2k

so.........as according to me means it is so brisk that it results in hampering the ability.
Whereas so that sounds a bit intentional. Then is so that ok here.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2016, 06:19
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Nevernevergiveup wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?



Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.


sayantanc2k

so.........as according to me means it is so brisk that it results in hampering the ability.
Whereas so that sounds a bit intentional. Then is so that ok here.


The usage so..that need not be intentional.

I was so tired that I could not keep my eyes open. (becoming tired is not intentional.)
The place is so beautiful that I felt like living there forever. (being beautiful is not intentional.)
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 00:21
I get that answer B is correct, I wanted to understand why the comma is placed after and(and,) and not before it.
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New post 28 Jul 2017, 11:45
Martini wrote:
I get that answer B is correct, I wanted to understand why the comma is placed after and(and,) and not before it.



Hello Martini,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let me present the sentence with Choice B:

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make sense of speech.

Please note that the phrase as a result has been placed between two commas as it presents additional information that because some children may have difficulty in distinguishing discrete sounds and words, they may not be able to make sense of what is spoken.

If we were to remove the phrase as a result from the sentence, then the commas before as and after result would be removed too.

So, the comma after and does not belong to and.


Hope this helps. :-)
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 03:01
I am unable to understand how to identify from where the parallelism is starting. According to me it started from "distinguishing discrete..." (which is incorrect).Can anyone help me with problem
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New post 24 Nov 2017, 04:08
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tusumathur1995 wrote:
I am unable to understand how to identify from where the parallelism is starting. According to me it started from "distinguishing discrete..." (which is incorrect).Can anyone help me with problem


I have rephrased the sentence in most concise way possible for me to do. Hope it gets the doubt about parallelism clear

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk that it hampers the ability of some children
1) to distinguish discrete sounds and words
and
2) to make sense of speech as a result.

The phrase 'as a result' is a descriptive phrase for what follows it, much like the the "however" in the following example-
" I , however, don't feel that the plan will be a success. "
The "however" can be placed at the beginning as well, in exactly the same way as seen in the actual question - " as a result, to make sense of speech".
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2017, 10:22
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A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make

A new controversy: The OA is said to be B. However, what does the pronoun 'it' stands for in B? It could be the 'study' or the 'pace', the two nouns available for the pronoun 'it' to refer to. However, both do not make much sense. After all, a study does not hamper anything nor can the 'pace', which simply means the rate of speed by itself, really hamper. It is the briskness of the pace that really hampers. All the same, the word briskness is conspicuously absent in the choice
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New post 03 Jun 2019, 10:05
ritjn2003 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.


(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make

(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make

(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making

(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make


Let's go managers

Look here
Round 1 IDIOMATIC Usage
we need a that or as to, so that it becomes... so X that/ as to Y
A is gone

Round 2 WORDY
C is wordy, "they are unable to make"
E is wordy,"resulting in being unable to make"

Round 3 PARALLELISM
D is so not parallel


B is the winner!!!!!!!!!!
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New post 17 Jun 2019, 05:34
russ9 wrote:
Can someone please explain why, in option C, "the result of this" is incorrect?

Dear Team,

even I have the same doubt and not convinced with explanation provided in the thread till now.
Kindly explain in detail.

Thanks in advance
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New post 17 Jun 2019, 07:03
priyanshu14 wrote:
russ9 wrote:
Can someone please explain why, in option C, "the result of this" is incorrect?

Dear Team,

even I have the same doubt and not convinced with explanation provided in the thread till now.
Kindly explain in detail.

Thanks in advance
bb generis GMATNinja EMPOWERgmatVerbal



By all means please check out my previous solution to the problem. I will elaborate for you in detail why option C is incorrect

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

Look
here's option C
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

I'm hoping that you are aware of the idiomatic usage, preposition, and parallel structure

I'll eliminate it by all three, cool?

Idiomatic usage
"the result of this, they are unable to make xyz"
the right way of saying this would be " the result of this is that that are unable to make xyz" which is still incorrect because it is wordier than B and also another reason I'll discuss in the latter option. For now, we know that GMAT prefers concise options if both options convey The same meaning and one of the options is shorter

Preposition as a referent to subject
There is a rule, this as a pronoun is incorrect; It is also weird as a reference, you must use "it" instead. Of course there are other reasons but this is just 2nd one to rule out C

Parallel structure
WELL WELL WELL
May be the other two rules are a bit tricky to understand, but we`got a simple rule on GMAT, According to veritas, IMPACTS: Where P stands for parallelism.
That "and" you see in the option C, yes that guy right there wants you to put parallel structure in your list to eliminate options
C is clearly not parallel

to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
YOU NEED TO ELIMINATE they are unable

I hope it was good enough
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A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 12:38
priyanshu14 wrote:
russ9 wrote:
Can someone please explain why, in option C, "the result of this" is incorrect?

Dear Team,

even I have the same doubt and not convinced with explanation provided in the thread till now.
Kindly explain in detail.

Thanks in advance
bb generis GMATNinja EMPOWERgmatVerbal


Hello again priyanshu14!

I think that Businessconquerer covered the initial reason the phrase "the result of this" is incorrect - it's not idiomatically correct. That phrase needs a verb after it to make sense (the result of this is/was...). It also doesn't work as a parenthetical phrase (a phrase placed between two commas that's just there to add emphasis).

The other reason option C is incorrect has to do with parallelism:

(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use parallel structure to describe the two things that are hampered in the sentence. Because of this, we can rule this option out.

I hope this helps, and thanks to Businessconquerer for the extra explanation!
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New post 27 Jun 2019, 20:06
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.


(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make

So X that Y. So It is wrong here. Same in E we use as.

(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make

That : Correct. And this is the correct answer.

(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

1st of all I will say it’s wordy. As in opt B it’s clear. For example. “as a result,” and “the result of this” . We should prefer as a result. To make and they are unable to make. Obviously they are referring to children. To be honest I did not find anything weird or wrong with this opt. The only thing is this opt is wordy where we have a batter option.

(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making

In not making : Changing the meaning. So Wrong.

(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make

So X that Y. So As is wrong here
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New post 08 Sep 2019, 01:27
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make --> so X as to Y --> WRONG



This is very poor advice, and makes me doubt some of your other explanations.
This idiom is not necessarily incorrect. Proof: https://gmatclub.com/forum/often-major- ... 94376.html
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New post 09 Sep 2019, 20:48
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I agree with you that the idiom can also be "so X as to Y" and not just "so X that Y". I guess in this question, it was just that (E) had other issues. But yes, we should not eliminate based on the idiom.

ghnlrug wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make --> so X as to Y --> WRONG



This is very poor advice, and makes me doubt some of your other explanations.
This idiom is not necessarily incorrect. Proof: https://gmatclub.com/forum/often-major- ... 94376.html
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New post 09 Sep 2019, 21:25
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one problem at a time, to narrow it down to the correct choice! First, here is the original question with any major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make

After a quick glance over the options, there are a few things we can focus on:

1. it hampers / that it hampers / as to hamper
2. for distinguishing / to distinguish
3. Their endings


Let's start with #1 on our list, which is an issue of idiom structure. The idiom we are trying to use here is this:

so X that Y

Here is how each option uses (or misuses) this idiom:

(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make --> so X Y --> WRONG
(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make --> so X as to Y --> WRONG

We can eliminate options A & E because they don't adhere to the idiom structure "so X that Y."

(It turns out we could also eliminate options A & E because they also incorrectly use the "for verb+ing" structure instead of the correct "to verb" in this sentence.)

Now that we've narrowed it down to 3 options, let's take a closer look at how each option ends, and look for any glaring issues. I'll give you a hint: it has something to do with parallelism!

(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make

This is our CORRECT option! It uses parallel structure with "to distinguish" and "to make!" It also uses the correct idiom structure "so X that Y."

(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use parallel structure to describe the two things that are hampered in the sentence. Because of this, we can rule this option out.

(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't use parallel structure to describe the two things being hampered in the sentence!


There you have it - option B is the correct choice because it follows the "so X that Y" idiom structure and uses parallelism correctly!


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Hi EMPOWERgmatVerbal
Thanks for the detailed explanation to an OG question.

My question is about the idiom used in option E: so X as to Y. You have marked it incorrect. I have come across a couple of question where this idiom has been used and the answer choice was correct. Link to one such question is below:

https://gmatclub.com/forum/immanuel-kan ... 62621.html

Now, when is it ok to use so X as to Y and when so X that Y?

Thanks.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2019, 00:20
sayantanc2k wrote:
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make
I always get these kind of questions wrong. I always end up making wrong things parallel..
In this case i did hampers with results ...

Can anyone please suggest how to improve on this one particular topic? How to find what parallels what? :oops:


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?


Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.


Hi sayantanc2k daagh

The usage of 'so brisk as to hamper the ability' is incorrect in option 'E' in my opinion because this usage gives an indication that 'the conversational pace of everyday life' is brisk with the intention of hampering the ability of children, altering slightly the intended meaning of the original sentence.

I do understand that there is another error in option 'E', but can you please throw some light on my above reasoning?


Thanks
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New post 12 Sep 2019, 12:31
Doer01 wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one problem at a time, to narrow it down to the correct choice! First, here is the original question with any major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make

After a quick glance over the options, there are a few things we can focus on:

1. it hampers / that it hampers / as to hamper
2. for distinguishing / to distinguish
3. Their endings


Let's start with #1 on our list, which is an issue of idiom structure. The idiom we are trying to use here is this:

so X that Y

Here is how each option uses (or misuses) this idiom:

(A) it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make --> so X Y --> WRONG
(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making --> so X that Y --> GOOD
(E) as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make --> so X as to Y --> WRONG

We can eliminate options A & E because they don't adhere to the idiom structure "so X that Y."

(It turns out we could also eliminate options A & E because they also incorrectly use the "for verb+ing" structure instead of the correct "to verb" in this sentence.)

Now that we've narrowed it down to 3 options, let's take a closer look at how each option ends, and look for any glaring issues. I'll give you a hint: it has something to do with parallelism!

(B) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make

This is our CORRECT option! It uses parallel structure with "to distinguish" and "to make!" It also uses the correct idiom structure "so X that Y."

(C) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make

This is INCORRECT because it doesn't use parallel structure to describe the two things that are hampered in the sentence. Because of this, we can rule this option out.

(D) that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making

This is also INCORRECT because it doesn't use parallel structure to describe the two things being hampered in the sentence!


There you have it - option B is the correct choice because it follows the "so X that Y" idiom structure and uses parallelism correctly!


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Hi EMPOWERgmatVerbal
Thanks for the detailed explanation to an OG question.

My question is about the idiom used in option E: so X as to Y. You have marked it incorrect. I have come across a couple of question where this idiom has been used and the answer choice was correct. Link to one such question is below:

https://gmatclub.com/forum/immanuel-kan ... 62621.html

Now, when is it ok to use so X as to Y and when so X that Y?

Thanks.


Hello Doer01!

Thanks for your question! In general, the idiom "so X that Y" is preferred over "so X as to Y" in English, which is why I chose to go that route when answering this question.

After doing some more research, though - you have a point. Neither of these constructions is better/worse. You can absolutely use them interchangeably. In fact, it seems that the GMAT exam likes to toss this idiom construction into questions to throw off students. Heck, it even got me!

As you can see from my explanation, you can also eliminate those same options because they use the for + verbing combination that is actually incorrect. Once you've eliminated those two options, the rest of the explanation still works.

I appreciate the question because, as you can see, sometimes the GMAT test writers trick even the best of us! In the future, if you see a question that has the "so X that Y" and "so X as to Y" debate, start looking for a more obvious problem instead!

I hope this helps!
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