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A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may

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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2016, 05:59
3
gmatlbs wrote:
I got the answer correct , but one quick query ....
Isn't "..., as a result,..."mentioned in choice B , hampering the parallelism?

I'm i correct in understanding that since "..., as a result,..." is mentioned within commas it is not impacting the parallelism.
Please help.


as a result is a modifier phrase, encapsulated in a pair of commas so yes it does not impact the parallelism,
it enhances the meaning of the second infinitive "to make" , establishing the cause - effect relationship between the two elements presented in parallel construction.
in fact, without "as a result" , these elements cannot be entirely parallel because they're not independent consequences that can be purely separated by "and" .

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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 11:19
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make
I always get these kind of questions wrong. I always end up making wrong things parallel..
In this case i did hampers with results ...

Can anyone please suggest how to improve on this one particular topic? How to find what parallels what? :oops:


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 12:10
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make
I always get these kind of questions wrong. I always end up making wrong things parallel..
In this case i did hampers with results ...

Can anyone please suggest how to improve on this one particular topic? How to find what parallels what? :oops:


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?


Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2016, 17:55
sayantanc2k wrote:
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make


can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?



Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.


sayantanc2k

so.........as according to me means it is so brisk that it results in hampering the ability.
Whereas so that sounds a bit intentional. Then is so that ok here.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2016, 05:19
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Nevernevergiveup wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
can some expert explain whether so.......as to idiom usage fits here?



Yes, so... as.. (as used in option E) is valid. Option E is wrong because of another idiomatic error - "ability for..." is wrong.


sayantanc2k

so.........as according to me means it is so brisk that it results in hampering the ability.
Whereas so that sounds a bit intentional. Then is so that ok here.


The usage so..that need not be intentional.

I was so tired that I could not keep my eyes open. (becoming tired is not intentional.)
The place is so beautiful that I felt like living there forever. (being beautiful is not intentional.)
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 23:21
I get that answer B is correct, I wanted to understand why the comma is placed after and(and,) and not before it.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 10:45
Martini wrote:
I get that answer B is correct, I wanted to understand why the comma is placed after and(and,) and not before it.



Hello Martini,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Let me present the sentence with Choice B:

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make sense of speech.

Please note that the phrase as a result has been placed between two commas as it presents additional information that because some children may have difficulty in distinguishing discrete sounds and words, they may not be able to make sense of what is spoken.

If we were to remove the phrase as a result from the sentence, then the commas before as and after result would be removed too.

So, the comma after and does not belong to and.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 02:01
I am unable to understand how to identify from where the parallelism is starting. According to me it started from "distinguishing discrete..." (which is incorrect).Can anyone help me with problem
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 03:08
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tusumathur1995 wrote:
I am unable to understand how to identify from where the parallelism is starting. According to me it started from "distinguishing discrete..." (which is incorrect).Can anyone help me with problem


I have rephrased the sentence in most concise way possible for me to do. Hope it gets the doubt about parallelism clear

A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk that it hampers the ability of some children
1) to distinguish discrete sounds and words
and
2) to make sense of speech as a result.

The phrase 'as a result' is a descriptive phrase for what follows it, much like the the "however" in the following example-
" I , however, don't feel that the plan will be a success. "
The "however" can be placed at the beginning as well, in exactly the same way as seen in the actual question - " as a result, to make sense of speech".
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2017, 09:22
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A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may be so brisk it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make sense of speech.

A. it hampers the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words and, the result is, to make
B. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, as a result, to make
C. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words and, the result of this, they are unable to make
D. that it hampers the ability of some children to distinguish discrete sounds and words, and results in not making
E. as to hamper the ability of some children for distinguishing discrete sounds and words, resulting in being unable to make

A new controversy: The OA is said to be B. However, what does the pronoun 'it' stands for in B? It could be the 'study' or the 'pace', the two nouns available for the pronoun 'it' to refer to. However, both do not make much sense. After all, a study does not hamper anything nor can the 'pace', which simply means the rate of speed by itself, really hamper. It is the briskness of the pace that really hampers. All the same, the word briskness is conspicuously absent in the choice
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Re: A new study suggests that the conversational pace of everyday life may   [#permalink] 25 Nov 2017, 09:22

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