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Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers

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Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2013, 16:20
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Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.


A. so dense and convoluted as to pose

B. so dense and convoluted they posed

C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed

E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose
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Re: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2014, 02:12
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Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


OE from Veritas Prep Your success on Sentence Correction will depend much more on your ability to recognize what is wrong than to recognize what is right. This question offers an excellent example – you know that the structure “so X that Y” is a commonly accepted idiom.

You’ve become accustomed to seeing that structure and so when you see the phrasing “so X as to Y” in choice A and the much-more-familiar “so X that Y” in choice C, your inclination is to quickly eliminate A. But A is the correct answer.

Simply because “so X that Y” is correct does NOT mean that “so X as to Y” is incorrect. Idioms are commonly accepted ways to phrase an idea – but they are not exclusive. There are many – or several, or quite a few – ways to express any idea. And much like there is no “greatest prime number” (ask your instructor for the proof, using what you learned in Arithmetic) there is no “one and only” correct idiom. You can almost always find one more. So you can study idiomatic expressions for months and not have them mastered, and what’s worse – you’ll likely only lead yourself astray from your core competencies like verb tense. In this example, the past-tense in choice C (and B and D) is illogical. It’s wrong. So the not-as-common idiom in A, attached to the “correct” usage of verb tense, provides the correct answer. It’s not what you want to see – but the author knows this and constructed a question in which what you wanted to see was bait.

The authors of these questions are grammar experts and they know this about you – you will never know all of the correct idiomatic expressions, accepted sentence structures, or allowable ways to phrase an idea. So they use them. They take the common phrasing and attach it to an incorrect answer – one containing a major-category error that you should know – and correct that problem in a choice that uses an awkward, unexpected, but still correct structure or idiom. They know that you want to choose “what you know to be right” but that in doing so you’re apt to also wed yourself to something that is hidden, but wrong.


Answer: A
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2015, 23:25
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This is a very good question IMO.
Let me give an explanation of my choice.

A) Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.

Kant's writings - Subject.
are characterized - verb
sentences - object noun
so dense and convoluted as to pose- modifier
The sentence has an appositive. We can read the sentence without it. It would read-
Immanuel Kant's writings are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.

Correct verb "are" is used. The choice is in the present tense. The underlined portion refers to sentences. It makes sense. We can keep it and look at other choices

Choice B, C & D have a tense error. Since the subject of the sentence is in present tense, we cannot use past tense to modify the object - sentences
"they posed" - past tense is there in all three choices. Therefore, all three should be eliminated.

Choice E
dense and convoluted enough as they pose

Meaning error- The intended meaning is that because the sentences are so dense and convoluted, they become a major hurdle for people who are interested to read his writings. However, this choice gives an impression that because the writings pose a major hurdle for readers the sentences are dense and convoluted enough.

So A is the best choice.
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2013, 04:42
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avohden wrote:
Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose

B. so dense and convoluted they posed

C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed

E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


oe to follow

Good question

Firstly the writings are still there and so they still "pose" problems for readers.... yes , "posed" is wrong... so down to (a) and (e) .. ( a) is clear and concise....

P.s (c) looks tempting enough but can be easily eliminated on the basis of tenses.
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2015, 05:40
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Immanuel Kant's writings are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose[/u] a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.

Meaning: Kant's writings contain complex sentences and these sentences are so complex that readers face problems to understand them.

This sentence is presented as a general fact or statement.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose.............answer

B. so dense and convoluted they posed..........they don't pose only in past they can be difficult even now. Changes the intended meaning.

C. so dense and convoluted that they posed..............so that indicates purpose.
There is no purpose here i.e., neither difficulty is intentionally induced nor hurdles for reader are intentional.
posed repeats here.


D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed.........enough error is introduced here.
posed issue repeats here.


E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose...............changes the intended meaning as if they become complex when they pose hurdles for reader.


There are few aspects to be noted here.
1. here convoluted is an adjective not a verb in past tense.
Meaning of convoluted as per Oxford dictionary is as below.

Quote:
convoluted....adjective

1(Especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and difficult to follow:
the film is let down by a convoluted plot in which nothing really happens
When Douglas's character smells a rat, the convoluted thriller plot is set in motion.

convolute..........verb
The data was therefore convoluted with a profile that mimics the image of a microtubule to filter out the vertical coordinate.
Sula challenges us to reconsider how histories of tops and bottoms within American social structures become convoluted into the ironic hierarchies and differences in African American society.


So here dense and convoluted both define the complex nature of sentences.

2.Why option A is correct.

"So X as to Y" means something is SO (big, strong, slow, whatever, but something kind of extreme) that it actually causes something else to happen - something that wouldn't ordinarily happen.

so here the sentences are so difficult that their difficulty resulted in becoming hurdle for readers.

3. For those who feel D or E can be right. This info from Mgmat forum helps.

1. The temperature outside was cold enough to cause frostbite.
2. The temperature outside was so cold as to cause frostbite.
There is a subtle distinction between the idiom "so x as to y" and "x is enough to y."

The original sentence uses the idiom "so x as to y" to indicate that characteristic x is so extreme in the particular case that y results.

In contrast, the idiom "x is enough to y" is used when x is the criteria by which an ability to achieve y is measured.
Thus, if a sentence stated that "The temperature outside was cold enough to cause frostbite." this would convey a different meaning: that the temperature is the criteria by which one measures the ability to cause frostbite."

For one thing, "X enough to Y" has a little more of a connotation of intention -- for example, "I ate enough to win the eating contest" is preferable to "I ate so much as to win the eating contest."

In the former case, I intended to win the contest, and I ate enough to ensure that. In the latter case, I could have simply been on an eating binge, and by accident I wound up winning the contest.

However, in the case, the difference isn't one of intention. In the first case, "The temperature was cold enough to cause frostbite," I'm emphasizing the outcome -- in a way, I'm defining two temperature ranges, one that causes frostbite and one that doesn't, and I'm saying, we're in the former.

But if I say "The temperature was so cold as to cause frostbite," in a sense I'm just tossing out the fact that frostbite would be caused in this case, but I'm not defining a threshold as I am with the "cold enough to cause frostbite."
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2016, 09:07
In Option C, can "they" be used to refer to sentences ??
Or "they" is only used to refer people??
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2016, 09:20
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282552 wrote:
In Option C, can "they" be used to refer to sentences ??
Or "they" is only used to refer people??


Hi,
THEY can refer to both person and objects..
Even sentences can be referred by they..
example..
who wrote those sentences?
they were written by Mr X..
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 17:10
chetan2u wrote:
282552 wrote:
In Option C, can "they" be used to refer to sentences ??
Or "they" is only used to refer people??


Hi,
THEY can refer to both person and objects..
Even sentences can be referred by they..
example..
who wrote those sentences?
they were written by Mr X..

Well I don't know whether I am right or not but for me is clear that "they" don't have a clear antecedent, so straightforward to A.
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2016, 12:34
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anonimo wrote:
chetan2u wrote:
282552 wrote:
In Option C, can "they" be used to refer to sentences ??
Or "they" is only used to refer people??


Hi,
THEY can refer to both person and objects..
Even sentences can be referred by they..
example..
who wrote those sentences?
they were written by Mr X..

Well I don't know whether I am right or not but for me is clear that "they" don't have a clear antecedent, so straightforward to A.


Yes, the pronoun they is definitely ambiguous.

In fact because it is subject of a clause (they pose significant hurdle), it actually refers to writings, subject of another clause (writings are characterized), by virtue of parallelism. (GMAT allows such reference if there are more than two possible antecedents). Nonetheless they should actually refer to sentences, not writings.
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2016, 23:27
Hi chetan2u / daagh / mikemcgarry ,

Can you please suggest me when these constructions with examples.
1. So...as...
2. So...that...

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose.
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

Whats wrong with option C.
I hope we use so..that construction to show intensity but when it comes to choose between these two, I am totally clueless.
I face a lot of trouble in choosing between these construction.

If there is any rule so that I can learn it better, then it would be the best option for me.

Please help in this
Will be waiting for your response.
Thanks
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2016, 07:45
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PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi chetan2u / daagh / mikemcgarry ,

Can you please suggest me when these constructions with examples.
1. So...as...
2. So...that...

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose.
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

Whats wrong with option C.
I hope we use so..that construction to show intensity but when it comes to choose between these two, I am totally clueless.
I face a lot of trouble in choosing between these construction.

If there is any rule so that I can learn it better, then it would be the best option for me.

Please help in this
Will be waiting for your response.
Thanks



hi,
the difference is not so much on so..that.. and so..as to ..
but what THEY refers too..
they here refers to the writings, while the original by removing PRONOUN talks of the "sentence"
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Re: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 10:03
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E in its entirety: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted enough as they pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

'Enough' mostly means to be to a satisfactory level or extent to do something positive or fulfill a desire or wish. Negative phenomena are unlikely to follow 'enough'. A negative feature like - they pose a significant hurdle - is, therefore, some kind of a paradox. That is the reason the acceptable idiom is -so adjective that - rather than - so adjective enough-. Since it is an idiomatic usage, we cannot question its correctness.
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Re: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 05:21
daagh wrote:
E in its entirety: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted enough as they pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

'Enough' mostly means to be to a satisfactory level or extent to do something positive or fulfill a desire or wish. Negative phenomena are unlikely to follow 'enough'. A negative feature like - they pose a significant hurdle - is, therefore, some kind of a paradox. That is the reason the acceptable idiom is -so adjective that - rather than - so adjective enough-. Since it is an idiomatic usage, we cannot question its correctness.


Hi Daagh Sir,
Is 'they' in options ambiguous ? Does it refer to writings or sentences ?
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Re: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 08:23
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Apparently, 'they' looks ambiguous since it does not seem clear whether it refers to the writings or to the sentences. However, let us go out of the box a little. The word 'their' definitely refers to his writings. If 'their' refers to his writings, then 'they' also should refer to his writings rather than 'sentences'.
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Re: Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2018, 13:03
Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.


A. so dense and convoluted as to pose

B. so dense and convoluted they posed

C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed

E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose

B,C and D are using past tense,while the sentence is using present continuous. E is change in meaning.Thus A is the correct answer.
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Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2019, 21:12
abhishekdadarwal2009 wrote:
Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers interested in his works.


A. so dense and convoluted as to pose

B. so dense and convoluted they posed

C. so dense and convoluted that they posed

D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed

E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose

B,C and D are using past tense,while the sentence is using present continuous. E is change in meaning.Thus A is the correct answer.


One question.
If (C) and (D) have no tense error - using "pose" instead of "posed", will those 2 answers be correct?
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Immanuel Kant's writings, while praised by many philosophers   [#permalink] 26 Jul 2019, 21:12
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