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People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim

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People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

26% (01:49) correct 74% (01:46) wrong based on 376 sessions

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People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery. Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers. Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

Which one of the following is an assumption the argument requires?

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.

Source: LSAT
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 05:44
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Masshole wrote:
People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery. Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers. Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

Which one of the following is an assumption the argument requires?

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.

Source: LSAT


Answer: E

Let's decode the stimuli first:
difficult to distinguish between scientifically valid information and quackery.
quackery appears appealing -> will do more harm.

Now, lets check the options

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.
-already given

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.
- correct ( try to negate this option )

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.
- we are not concerned with People who have sufficient medical knowledge rather with people who rely on the web

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.
- this option does not tell us anything

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.
- wrong option. People attempting to diagnose (but we don't know if they are diagnosing on we or not)
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 05:07
Masshole wrote:
People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery. Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers. Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

Which one of the following is an assumption the argument requires?

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.

Source: LSAT

https://lsathacks.com/explanations/lsat ... ng-2/q-11/

QUESTION TYPE: Necessary Assumption

CONCLUSION: People who rely on the web to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

REASONING: People who look for medical info on the web often can’t tell what is scientific and what is quackery (nonsense). A lot of the quackery is attractive because it is more clearly written than scientific papers.

ANALYSIS: The argument is assuming that people will often hurt themselves if they rely on quackery. But this doesn’t have to be the case. Maybe quackery is harmless or occasionally beneficial.

___________

A. This isn’t necessary. It’s only necessary that when they do try to diagnose themselves, they hurt themselves more often than not.
Negation: Most of the time, people browsing the web for medical information aren’t trying to diagnose themselves.

B. CORRECT. If people are not more likely to do themselves more harm than good even if they look at quackery then this argument isn’t much good.

C. This isn’t necessary. The argument would actually be slightly strengthened if some of these people hurt themselves too.

D. This would be helpful to the argument, because it would mean that people might assume that quackery is scientific. But it doesn’t need to be true.
Negation: Few people who browse the web assume information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

E. This isn’t necessary. The argument is fine if some people manage to harm themselves despite looking only at scientific literature.
Negation: People attempting to diagnose themselves may hurt themselves even if they only use scientific literature.
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 10:15
It should be E...

not sure why OA B....
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People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 21:40
can someone explain the difference between B and E. both are more or less similar to each other.
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 22:20
boil down to B and D, now I can clearly see B is the answer.
Fortunately, this is not gmat-style question b/c negate D is quite trouble-some, test takers can skip this question.
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People who browse the web for medical [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 30 Aug 2017, 07:27
People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery. Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers. Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

Which one of the following is an assumption the argument requires?

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.

Explanation pls

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Originally posted by arif24 on 30 Aug 2017, 00:46.
Last edited by broall on 30 Aug 2017, 07:27, edited 1 time in total.
Merged topic. Please search before posting question.
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2017, 10:01
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arif24 wrote:
People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery. Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers. Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

Which one of the following is an assumption the argument requires?

(A) People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

(B) People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

(C) People who have sufficient medical knowledge to discriminate between scientifically valid information and quackery will do themselves no harm if they rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions.

(D) Many people who browse the web assume that information is not scientifically valid unless it is clearly written.

(E) People attempting to diagnose their medical conditions will do themselves more harm than good only if they rely on quackery instead of scientifically valid information.

Explanation pls

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let me try to explain if still you have not got the answer-

For Assumption Question it is always advisable to go through negation method
so basicall we have to find the option if negated breaks the Conclusion

Premise - Much of the quackery is particularly appealing to readers with no medical background because it is usually written more clearly than scientific papers

So basically Conclusion is followed by tHus, because here author thinks that Secientfic papers are good but Quackery is bad, so assumptyion should be that If you are taking teh help of Scientific paper it will not cause harm

Conclusion of this argument is -

Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good.

No we will go to Option -

A. People who browse the web for medical information typically do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

After Negation - People who browse the web for medical information typically do not do so in an attempt to diagnose their medical conditions.

This negation is not Breaking down the Conclusion but you are just createing your own negative conclusion because Conclusin is telling that there are soem people who rely on web to diognize medical condition

B. People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves more harm than good unless they rely exclusively on scientifically valid information.

After Negation - People who attempt to diagnose their medical conditions are likely to do themselves less harm unless they rely exclusively on Quavkery information (Opposite of Scientific)
Rest all other option can be discared.
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2017, 12:12
B is better than E, b/c if people rely on both scientific, valid information and quackery, E can no longer be true.
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Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2018, 09:30
Oh this one is tricky. I thought about B, C, & E. I think B is better.

A and D are obviously wrong. A and D simply define or repeat some of the details in the questions.

Premise #1: People can't tell which is better, scientifically valid info or quackery.
Premise #2: People with no sufficient medical background are more likely attracted to quackery because quackery is written more clearly.

Conclusion: People, who want to diagnose their medical problems, may do themselves more harm if they rely on web (quackery).

Proposed assumption #1: Information in web quackery more likely provides harmful medical advice.
Proposed assumption #2: People, who want to diagnose their medical problems, may not do themselves more harm if they rely on scientifically valid information.

And the most important logic of doing "assumption" questions - diverse answer to the assumption will either strengthen or weaken the argument.

B), The best. Basically this is my proposed assumption #2. If this is true then the argument will be strengthened. If this is not true (people will not do themselves more good than harm by relying exclusively on scientifically valid info), then the argument will be weakened. It's weakened because, in that case, if reliance on neither scientifically valid info nor quackery will do more good, the argument simply voids itself.

C), Tricky #1. The logic of picking this one may get you to the right answer in some other types of questions but not this question. The question mentions neither about people with sufficient medical knowledge nor about people with sufficient medical knowledge will be in a better position. To find the assumption we will have to make additional assumptions to make option C valid - this is usually a red flag in assumption questions.

D), Tricky #2. I always believe that "key words" in questions determine which answer is better. As soon as I got the key words, I eliminated this one. Check the question: Thus, people who rely on the web when attempting to diagnose their medical conditions [are likely] to do themselves more harm than good. So compared to using scientifically valid info, using quackery has a higher possibly of getting harm. This doesn't mean that using scientifically valid info won't get harm. Option D is too absolute.
Re: People who browse the web for medical information often cannot discrim   [#permalink] 19 May 2018, 09:30
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