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While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.

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While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2010, 08:47
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D
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While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

(A) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

(B) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from

(C) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

(D) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

(E) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

Why do we need a perfect tense here.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2011, 09:50
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Step1. Between x to y is wrong idiom; drop And C.
Step 2. Among B, D and E, B is using a comma after recession to join two independent clauses. This is a style error.
Step. 3. Bouncing back is a process that started sometime after the 2002 low and one that is still going on. Therefore the right tense will be a present perfect here, i.e. ‘has bounced’ Choice D is preferable to E
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Jul 2016, 09:22
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While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.
a) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
b) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
c) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
d) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
e) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

OA
soon

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Originally posted by Marcab on 19 Nov 2012, 09:43.
Last edited by Vyshak on 06 Jul 2016, 09:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2010, 09:31
1
tingle15 wrote:
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

A. was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
C. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
D. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
E. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

Why do we need a perfect tense here :(



HI tingle15,

as you know we should eliminate "between" since it requires "AND" not "TO".
So the possible options are B D E.

IN any situation if two events are related and one occurred in the past and the other followed it, the previous event takes perfect tense and the event following it takes simple tense. Hence in this question, the 1st event namely, the bouncing back event has to take perfect tense.

Hence option D.

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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2011, 14:22
Onell wrote:
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

1.was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
2.bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
3.has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
4.has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
5.bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from


two issues:

(i) Fix the idiom - "from x to y" or "between x and y" ....... Eliminate A and C.
(ii) Tense - keep the tenses close to each other when possible.......... Eliminate B and E.

That's D.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 20 Nov 2012, 02:45
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Hi Marcab.

Here is how I thought this one through....

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

This looks like a tense issue. The sentence is trying to say that whilst one thing (stock market bounce back) has already happened. Something else (US family income) are still struggling. Let us see which of the answers below have that...[/color]

a) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
b) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
c) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
d) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
e) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

SO only c & d have the correct tense. The only other difference between the 2 is the last word. Is it 'between' or 'from'.

Here we are down to Idiom. From... to is correct

SO D is correct

Originally posted by plumber250 on 19 Nov 2012, 11:48.
Last edited by plumber250 on 20 Nov 2012, 02:45, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2012, 13:18
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Hi there,

Choice C cannot be the correct answer because "between... to..." is an incorrect idiom. The correct idiom is "from... to...". Hence choice C is out.

Now, grammatically two choices come very close - choice D and E. But Choice D wins because of the usage of correct verb tense "has bounced". Notice the verb tense of the Independent Clause. It says, "US familiers ARE STILL REELING". This is a present continuous tense. Present perferct "has bounced" maintains the consistency of the tenses in the sentence. Choice E fails to do so by using simple past tense "bounced". Hence choice D is the correct answer.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2012, 07:09
crazypriya wrote:
IMO B.

Between seems awkward...should be 'from 2001 to 2004'....


Regards,
crazy4priya


Hi there,

Choice B cannot be the correct answer because in this choice, two independent clauses have been joined by comma. This is not correct. Choice D is the correct answer. Semicolon correctly joins two ICs.

Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2012, 00:03
gmatbull wrote:
Hi Plumber & Shraddha,
i think the use of "while" here suggests that 2 things were happening concurrently... or the effect of 2 things are felt
at the same time.

While X happens, Y's are still happening. (Y's = U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession)
Although X started to happen in the past, it is still happening or its effects are still felt; similar to stock market has bounced
& is still bouncing, right?

To match the use of "while" for simultaneity of events we need another event that is STILL TAKING place to the present.
Otherwise, we can say "although X happened, Y's are still happening" Looks correct. Similar to saying:
Although the stock market bounced, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession...

Kindly correct me if am wrong.

Thanks.


Hii BULL,
The red portion implies that the cause was over, when the sentence was being written. So the red portion can't be parallel to the the next clause. IMO, had it been "Although the stock market HAS bounced, US families bla bla bla". In the same way, "while" has been used. Usage of "while the stock market has bounced" implies that we are talking of an event in the present tense and because of the usage of "while", a simultaneous event is expected.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2012, 00:47
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2013, 19:07
D is correct - has bounced back and are still reeling are in present tense and the Idiom from X to Y is also correct
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2015, 10:03
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souvik101990 wrote:
This question is part of the GMAT Club Sentence Correction : Verb Tense Revision Project.

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

A. was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from

C. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

D. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

E. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from


My question is wrt option 'D' . Is it the right use of semi colon ? I think to join to independent clauses using semi colon e need a connector such as 'However' , 'otherwise' , etc. In the example 'D' I see two independent clauses joined without any connector.

Can someone explain where am I going wrong with 'B' ? My understanding is as below:

'typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third' is absolute modifier which explains the clause 'U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession'

So I see nothing wrong with B.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2015, 19:10
sytabish wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
This question is part of the GMAT Club Sentence Correction : Verb Tense Revision Project.

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

A. was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from

C. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

D. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

E. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from


My question is wrt option 'D' . Is it the right use of semi colon ? I think to join to independent clauses using semi colon e need a connector such as 'However' , 'otherwise' , etc. In the example 'D' I see two independent clauses joined without any connector.

Can someone explain where am I going wrong with 'B' ? My understanding is as below:

'typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third' is absolute modifier which explains the clause 'U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession'

So I see nothing wrong with B.


hi sytabish,

you are correct that semi colon is preferrably used to join two independent clauses and one starting with connector such as however etc...
semi colon joins two independent clauses related to each other and these connectors do that itself "relate two independent clauses"
however semicolon can also be used, at times, without connector if the close relation is still seen... here one can see the two portion are related and are independent clauses, so one can use semicolon....
now lets look at the B choice..
B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from....
from 2001 to 2004... is an independent clause which is related to first independent clause....
we cannot join two independent clause with comma, it results in an error called "comma splice".....
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2015, 11:44
Between E and D present perfect shows results. That is why it is the correct answer.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2015, 20:13
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In the original sentence, "While the stock market was bouncing back" implies that
something else was taking place simultaneously in the past, but the rest of the
sentence is in present tense ("U.S. families are still reeling"). In addition, the phrasing
"between 2001 to 2004" is incorrect; the correct idiom is either "between X and Y" or
"from X to Y" (and, in this case, we must use "from X to Y" since only the first word is
underlined).

(A) This choice is incorrect as it repeats the original sentence.

(B) "While the stock market bounced back" implies that the next action took place
simultaneously in the past, but the next verb ("are still reeling") is in the present
tense. In addition, this is a run-on sentence; the comma after the word "recession"
should be a semi-colon.

(C) This sentence incorrectly uses "between X to Y." The correct idiom must be "from
X to Y."

(D) CORRECT. This choice remedies the mis-matched tenses by pairing the present
perfect "has bounced back," which indicates an action began in the past and has
continued into the present, with the present tense "are still reeling." In addition, it
uses the correct idiom ("from X to Y").

(E) "While the stock market bounced back" implies that the next action took place
simultaneously in the past, but the next verb ("are still reeling") is in the present tense.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2015, 07:17
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.
a) was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between "was bouncing back" is not in the correct tense for "are still reeling," between..to is not idiomatic =>eliminate A, C
b) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from "bounced back" is not the correct tense, as the effects are ongoing, the clause should be preceded by a semicolon =>eliminate B and E
d) has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

e) bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2016, 05:04
souvik101990 wrote:
This question is part of the GMAT Club Sentence Correction : Verb Tense Revision Project.

While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

A. was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from

C. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between

D. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from

E. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from


Here is my 2 bits :-
1.Action#1=Stock markets - bounce back
2.Action#2=US family - reel in recession
3.Action#1 and Action#2 both started at the same time.<Please Correct if reqd.>
4.While Action#1 happened in the past (from the authors tone) and effects are continuing The Action#2 happened/still happening.
5.Hence,Action#1=present perfect and Action#2=present continuous.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2016, 06:55
daagh wrote:
Step1. Between x to y is wrong idiom; drop And C.
Step 2. Among B, D and E, B is using a comma after recession to join two independent clauses. This is a style error.
Step. 3. Bouncing back is a process that started sometime after the 2002 low and one that is still going on. Therefore the right tense will be a present perfect here, i.e. ‘has bounced’ Choice D is preferable to E


excellent explanation!
god..it looks like i forgot some of the idioms..need to repeat all of them ASAP :)
I eliminated A, B, and E because of the tense for the subject stock market. since the non-underlined portion uses X to Y, we can't use between, therefore D is the best.
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2017, 06:52
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 12:33
While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between 2001 to 2004, typical household savings plummeted nearly 25% and the median household debt rose by a third.

Split-1 : Between / From : Correct Usage of between is "between X and Y"
and Correct usage of from is "From X to Y"
Hence Option A and C are out.


A. was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
B. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession, from
Split-2 : The action of "Bouncing" started from 2002 and from the usage of "while" it is clear that it is still going on, so we need to use a present perfect tense "has + verb-ed"
Hence option B and E are out since they use "bounced"

C. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; between
D. has bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
Correct Answer
E. bounced back from its 2002 low, U.S. families are still reeling from the recent recession; from
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Re: While the stock market was bouncing back from its 2002 low, U.S.   [#permalink] 19 Jun 2017, 12:33

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