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A doctor at the Amsterdam Clinic maintains that if children

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A doctor at the Amsterdam Clinic maintains that if children [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2008, 14:12
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A
B
C
D
E

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A doctor at the Amsterdam Clinic maintains that if children eat a diet high in vitamins and took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch the common cold.

a) took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch
b) took vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch
c) take vitamin supplements, they were less likely of catching
d) take vitamin supplements, they will be less likely of catching
e) take vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch

Last edited by llcooljayce on 25 Dec 2008, 14:29, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2008, 14:20
llcooljayce wrote:
A doctor at the Amsterdam Clinic maintains that if children eat a diet high in vitamins and took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch the common cold.

a) took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch
b) took vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch
c) take vitamin supplements, they were less likely of catching
d) take vitamin supplements, they will be less likely of catching
e) take vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch


eat a high diet is present tense, So we need take and not took A & B are out.

C uses were out.

Between D & E, I will go with D. If clause in present tense, we need a will + base verb.
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2008, 05:49
I go with E.
Less likely "of" catching looks awkward.
What is OA?
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2008, 10:07
Economist wrote:
I go with E.
Less likely "of" catching looks awkward.
What is OA?


I agree that E sounds better than D. How ever, with out the "will" the conditional clause falls apart and grammar trumps every thing else in SC. Hence I chose D. That said, I could be wrong for other reasons, which I am not seeing now.
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2008, 18:15
The OA is E

The first verb, "maintains", is in the present tense. So is the verb "eat". But the third verb, "took", which is supposed to be a parallel action with "eat", is in the past tense. Obviously, the two verbs are inconsistent with each other, and because only one of them is underlined, that's the one that must be wrong. The correct sentence must have a take in it, so we can eliminate A and B. Choice C puts the rest of the sentence in the past tense, so scratch C. Choice D puts the rest of the sentence in the future tense. This might be acceptable, but the choice also uses the incorrect idiomatic expression likely of catching. The correct answer to this question is E, which keeps the entire sentence in the present tense.

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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2008, 09:38
llcooljayce wrote:
The OA is E

The first verb, "maintains", is in the present tense. So is the verb "eat". But the third verb, "took", which is supposed to be a parallel action with "eat", is in the past tense. Obviously, the two verbs are inconsistent with each other, and because only one of them is underlined, that's the one that must be wrong. The correct sentence must have a take in it, so we can eliminate A and B. Choice C puts the rest of the sentence in the past tense, so scratch C. Choice D puts the rest of the sentence in the future tense. This might be acceptable, but the choice also uses the incorrect idiomatic expression likely of catching. The correct answer to this question is E, which keeps the entire sentence in the present tense.

Please provide kudos if you found this question and answer useful


What is the source of this Q? As per MGMAT, if clause is in present tense, then clause needs a will + base verb. Maintaining the present tense across the whole conditional is not correct. In fact with out using will, the whole purpose of a conditional clause is defeated.
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2008, 10:48
I agree with you icandy 100%.

if " the if statment is in present tense then the conditional statement has to have will"

Hence E for me as well( Although it's bit awkward)
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2008, 11:23
Taken from the Princeton Review 'Cracking the GMAT 2008 Edition'
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2008, 13:56
Yes I mean D. Thanks icandy

I double check with mgmat sc book and it confirm what I stated earlier.

O well, I guess I should move on.
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2008, 16:58
Agree with icandy, if should followed by will + base verb, however "likely of catching" is bit awkward than "likely to catch"....therefore I go with E.....
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2008, 02:19
llcooljayce wrote:
A doctor at the Amsterdam Clinic maintains that if children eat a diet high in vitamins and took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch the common cold.

a) took vitamin supplements, they will be less likely to catch
b) took vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch
c) take vitamin supplements, they were less likely of catching
d) take vitamin supplements, they will be less likely of catching
e) take vitamin supplements, they are less likely to catch



Why can it be E?

This is conditional type 1, Subject 1 + simple present tense, Subject 2 + simple future tense.

I chose D, what's wrong with it?
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2008, 02:35
I go for E because of the usage of "less likely to "
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Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2008, 02:41
I've got it. Next time I'll be more careful.

Go for E :D
Re: SC: Amsterdam Clinic   [#permalink] 30 Dec 2008, 02:41
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