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A new private college offers a course which prepares student

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A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2013, 04:58
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A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2013, 10:39
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shailendrasharma wrote:
A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu


Responding to PM.

I would look at options A and B.

We are given that:
1. 7% of professionals are successful in Industry X (say)
2. Course says guaranteed financial success
3. Conclusion: Incorrect advertising. In other words, 100% success rate not possible.

Let's talk in numbers here. Suppose, 1000 people enter industry X every year. So, 70 of them get successful.

Now, if the number of students in the course in 71, can course provide guaranteed success? The answer is No. Because in such a case, at least one was unsuccessful. So, the number of students in the course should not exceed 7% of the professionals.

This is what option A seeks to find and is thus correct.

Option B:
B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

It wants to find out if there is any guy who did not take the course but was successful. We are not concerned about such guys - they can be successful or they can be failures. That does not impact the conclusion or the advertisement of the course.

Other way to look at option B is by answering Yes and No to it.

If the answer to option B is yes, then there are people who did not take the course but were successful. Does that affect course's claim to provide guaranteed success? The answer is No. The course is not saying that you cannot be successful without the course. It is just saying that if you take the course, you will be successful.

If the answer to option B is No, then there are no people who did not take the course and were successful. But does this mean that all the people who took the course were successful? The answer is No.

So, either a Yes or No to the question does not weaken or strengthen the argument. Therefore, option B is incorrect.

Thanks,
Chiranjeev
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Dec 2014, 06:16
shailendrasharma wrote:
A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu




My two cents:
I was stuck between A and B. Now looking at A:
if the percentage is lower than 93%, say it is 90%, then that means 10% of the people did participate in the course, but only 7% are going to be successful. then yes, this is false advertising.
If we say no, actually more than (or equal to) than 93% didn't participate, then that means 7% did participate, and so we can't accuse the college of false advertising.

B: If there are people in the 7% who didn't participate in the course, that just means they didn't come to this college to study. It does't mean that all the people thsi college teaches won't be successful. This college may teach very few people in total, and all of them were successful in the career(perhaps they constituted only about 3% of the overall 7% force.


Hope I helped explain this!
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2015, 06:36
shailendrasharma wrote:
A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu


For a valid advert, no. of people in the course must always be <= 7%
(i.e. less than or just equal to the number of successful professionals, meaning that successful people's set must be a superset of the course-taking folks. In other words, nobody in the course must be unsuccessful, although there may be some people who are successful but did not take the course).
So, no. of people NOT taking the course must be > 93%.
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2015, 07:19
The college guarantee is based on the promise that all its candidates will be within the 7% of the financially successful group.

A helps us to evaluate the above.
If the %age of people who did not attend the course is more than 93% then %age of people who attended the course is less than 7% and all those who attended are within the 7% successful ones.
If the %age of people who did not attend the course is less than 93% then %age of people who attended the course is more than 7% and so some who attended the course were not successful.
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2015, 01:22
shailendrasharma wrote:
A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu


Correct me pls If I am wrong. Choice E is essentially stating in a broader scale than Choice A.
Lets analyze choice E: If we know percentage of prof. who have participated in the course, we will have the data to evaluate the advertisement. Lets assume that Out of 100 potential participants, the college only accepts less than 7%. Then, we can say that college is selecting potential candidates who proved to be successful after the program. Yet, I am not saying Choice A is wrong. Its only advantage that it is more specific, not more accurate.
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A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2015, 07:22
Post edited

Hi,


A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

So the Choice A is correct because it is specifically drafted to provide the validity of the argument by its answer of yes or No:
Answer Yes, the percentage is lower, Argument invalid
Answer No, the percentage is higher, argument valid

Now choice E which I marked, :roll: does not mentions the private college, it says - in a course, it could be from any college, that seems the only difference in the question

E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Answer> 7% but we dont know how many trained from that college
Answer<= 7% but we dont know how many trained from that college
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Re: A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2018, 18:14
Hi
I think D is slightly better than A.

If the total number of successful professionals is 70 & the new college has an intake of 300, then the advertising CAN be called misleading.

If the total number of successful professionals is 70 & the new college has an intake of 30, then the advertising CANNOT be called misleading(i.e. can be given benefit of doubt).
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A new private college offers a course which prepares student  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2018, 18:22
egmat wrote:
shailendrasharma wrote:
A new private college offers a course which prepares students for a career in which only 7% of the professionals are successful financially in the related industry. In a radio commercial, the course is presented as a guarantee to financial success based on that career. Clearly, such a guarantee warrants charges of false advertising.

The answer to which of the following would be most useful in evaluating the argument?

    A) Is the percentage of professionals that did not take part in the course in the new private college lower than 93%?

    B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

    C) Did more than 50% of the professionals graduate from a similar course offered by another college?

    D) How many students does the college accept into a single course?

    E) What percentage of professionals have participated in a course that trains for this specific career?

Source: gmat.babson.edu


Responding to PM.

I would look at options A and B.

We are given that:
1. 7% of professionals are successful in Industry X (say)
2. Course says guaranteed financial success
3. Conclusion: Incorrect advertising. In other words, 100% success rate not possible.

Let's talk in numbers here. Suppose, 1000 people enter industry X every year. So, 70 of them get successful.

Now, if the number of students in the course in 71, can course provide guaranteed success? The answer is No. Because in such a case, at least one was unsuccessful. So, the number of students in the course should not exceed 7% of the professionals.

This is what option A seeks to find and is thus correct.

Option B:
B) Did any of the professionals included in the 7% not graduate from the course?

It wants to find out if there is any guy who did not take the course but was successful. We are not concerned about such guys - they can be successful or they can be failures. That does not impact the conclusion or the advertisement of the course.

Other way to look at option B is by answering Yes and No to it.

If the answer to option B is yes, then there are people who did not take the course but were successful. Does that affect course's claim to provide guaranteed success? The answer is No. The course is not saying that you cannot be successful without the course. It is just saying that if you take the course, you will be successful.

If the answer to option B is No, then there are no people who did not take the course and were successful. But does this mean that all the people who took the course were successful? The answer is No.

So, either a Yes or No to the question does not weaken or strengthen the argument. Therefore, option B is incorrect.

Thanks,
Chiranjeev


Hi Chiranjeev,
I think D is slightly better than A.

If the total number of successful professionals is 70 & the new college has an intake of 300, then the advertising CAN be called misleading.

If the total number of successful professionals is 70 & the new college has an intake of 30, then the advertising CANNOT be called misleading(i.e. can be given benefit of doubt).

Does "evaluate type question" have steadfast YES & NO prerequisite. Does only options to which answer can be given in YES & NO stand valid. If it is so, it is easier to eliminate options having questions viz. how much/many, what %ge etc.
My reasoning does not comply with the YES & NO condition of evaluate type questions.

Pls clarify.
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A new private college offers a course which prepares student   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2018, 18:22
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