Last visit was: 14 Jul 2024, 09:14 It is currently 14 Jul 2024, 09:14
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Tags:
Show Tags
Hide Tags
Intern
Intern
Joined: 06 Jun 2022
Posts: 35
Own Kudos [?]: 34 [4]
Given Kudos: 16
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 530 Q45 V19
GPA: 3.5
Send PM
Intern
Intern
Joined: 06 Jun 2022
Posts: 35
Own Kudos [?]: 34 [0]
Given Kudos: 16
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 530 Q45 V19
GPA: 3.5
Send PM
Intern
Intern
Joined: 10 Feb 2024
Posts: 10
Own Kudos [?]: 1 [0]
Given Kudos: 5
Send PM
Manager
Manager
Joined: 19 Jan 2018
Posts: 239
Own Kudos [?]: 361 [0]
Given Kudos: 85
Location: India
Send PM
Re: A recent study found that people who use public transportation to comm [#permalink]
 
SiddharthPhalke wrote:
Why not C as the conclusion public transportation must be a contributing factor to weight gain

­SiddharthPhalke This ques uses the classic correlation to causation way.

people who use public transportation are more likely to be overweight than those who drive to work ----> Hence, using public transportation must therefore be a contributing factor to weight gain.
Quote:
C) The study found that people who use public transportation are more likely to work in sedentary jobs.

This option WEAKENS the argument by point out that NOT public transportation BUT sedentary jobs may the cause behind obesity.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 07 Feb 2024
Posts: 74
Own Kudos [?]: 66 [0]
Given Kudos: 620
Location: India
Concentration: Technology, Leadership
WE:Engineering (Aerospace and Defense)
Send PM
Re: A recent study found that people who use public transportation to comm [#permalink]
I understand how option A is correct. But why not D?????
In some cases, I have selected such answers where other studies showed similar results, why not in this case.

When I should go for a similar study-type answer?
Intern
Intern
Joined: 19 Feb 2024
Posts: 20
Own Kudos [?]: 19 [0]
Given Kudos: 20
Send PM
Re: A recent study found that people who use public transportation to comm [#permalink]
Why is D wrong... If other studies have shown similar results then this strengthens the author's conclusion

Against A, the choice says that they have controlled other factors but not all factors. So there is a possibility that other factors may have an effect on weight

Posted from my mobile device
Manhattan Prep Instructor
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 2696
Own Kudos [?]: 7855 [2]
Given Kudos: 56
GMAT 2: 780  Q50  V50
Send PM
Re: A recent study found that people who use public transportation to comm [#permalink]
2
Kudos
Expert Reply
 
divyansh843 wrote:
Why is D wrong... If other studies have shown similar results then this strengthens the author's conclusion

Against A, the choice says that they have controlled other factors but not all factors. So there is a possibility that other factors may have an effect on weight

Posted from my mobile device

­Two things to watch for:

This question is making a classic error--moving from correlation to causation. We accept the study that found a connection between using public transportation and being overweight. What we don't have to accept is the conclusion, which says that using public transportation CONTRIBUTES to a gain in weight. What if the causation goes the other way, and people who are overweight are simply more likely to choose the bus? It could also be more complicated. For instance, maybe people who ride the bus have lower incomes, and thus don't have as much time and money to put into exercise, etc.? We don't need to figure all that out, nor do we have to assume that being overweight has a behavioral cause. Maybe it's all the the genes! We just have to identify that we don't know which way the causation runs. If we can rule out some other potential causes of the difference in weight, then that strengthens the idea that using the bus is the cause. 

So why does D fail? Because it just supports the premise we've already accepted--that these factors are linked. We already knew that! It doesn't tell us anything about the CAUSE behind this link, so it does nothing for our argument. We often call this kind of statement a "premise booster," since it's just supporting the premise, and we already believe the premise by default. 

One other note: the goal here is just to strengthen, not to prove, so we need to apply that same standard to all answers. We can't cut A because it doesn't cover *everything.* None of the answers do, and in fact you'll almost never find a strengthen answer that fills all the holes in the argument.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: A recent study found that people who use public transportation to comm [#permalink]
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6979 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts
CR Forum Moderator
821 posts