GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Aug 2018, 03:22

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 Oct 2011
Posts: 311
A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2012, 15:24
1
11
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

62% (01:28) correct 38% (01:22) wrong based on 196 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be partitioned into 10 retangular gardens. If each of the gardens will have the same dimensions, how many feet of partitioning will be needed to seperate the garden?

(1) one of the demensions of each garden is to be 40 feet.

(2) one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 24 feet.
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4666
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2012, 17:48
2
1
Hi, there. I'm happy to help with this. :)

The prompt:
A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be partitioned into 10 rectangular gardens. If each of the gardens will have the same dimensions, how many feet of partitioning will be needed to separate the garden?

That part highlighted is HUGE hint in the prompt. The total area is 120 x 80 = 9600, so the gardens must each have an area of 960. If we know one side of a rectangle with area 960, we can find the other side.

Statement #1: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 40 feet.

960/40 = 96/4 = 24 (notice, this means 24*40 = 960 ... good to know!)

So we have 40x24 rectangles. The length of 24 doesn't go evenly into 80, so we must use five of the 24 lengths to fill out the 120 dimension. That leaves two 40 lengths in the 80 direction, for a two x five configuration of the gardens. This would allow us to figure out the extra perimeter. Statement #1, by itself, is sufficient.

Statement #2: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 24 feet.

Because we found that 24*40 = 960, we know 960/24 = 40. This leads to the same situation we had in #1, so statement #2, by itself, is sufficient.

Answer = D


Does that make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Nov 2010
Posts: 217
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
GMAT 1: 520 Q42 V19
GMAT 2: 540 Q44 V21
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2012, 03:44
mikemcgarry wrote:
Hi, there. I'm happy to help with this. :)

The prompt:
A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be partitioned into 10 rectangular gardens. If each of the gardens will have the same dimensions, how many feet of partitioning will be needed to separate the garden?

That part highlighted is HUGE hint in the prompt. The total area is 120 x 80 = 9600, so the gardens must each have an area of 960. If we know one side of a rectangle with area 960, we can find the other side.

Statement #1: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 40 feet.

960/40 = 96/4 = 24 (notice, this means 24*40 = 960 ... good to know!)

So we have 40x24 rectangles. The length of 24 doesn't go evenly into 80, so we must use five of the 24 lengths to fill out the 120 dimension. That leaves two 40 lengths in the 80 direction, for a two x five configuration of the gardens. This would allow us to figure out the extra perimeter. Statement #1, by itself, is sufficient.

Statement #2: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 24 feet.

Because we found that 24*40 = 960, we know 960/24 = 40. This leads to the same situation we had in #1, so statement #2, by itself, is sufficient.

Answer = D


Does that make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :)


Can you pls show in a diagram how u use 80.according to my thought process width 80 ill remain unaffected.and we ill divide length 120 in 10 gardens
_________________

The proof of understanding is the ability to explain it.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: I will not stop until i realise my goal which is my dream too
Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Posts: 205
Schools: Johnson '15
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2012, 06:19
mikemcgarry wrote:
Hi, there. I'm happy to help with this. :)

The prompt:
A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be partitioned into 10 rectangular gardens. If each of the gardens will have the same dimensions, how many feet of partitioning will be needed to separate the garden?

That part highlighted is HUGE hint in the prompt. The total area is 120 x 80 = 9600, so the gardens must each have an area of 960. If we know one side of a rectangle with area 960, we can find the other side.

Statement #1: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 40 feet.

960/40 = 96/4 = 24 (notice, this means 24*40 = 960 ... good to know!)

So we have 40x24 rectangles. The length of 24 doesn't go evenly into 80, so we must use five of the 24 lengths to fill out the 120 dimension. That leaves two 40 lengths in the 80 direction, for a two x five configuration of the gardens. This would allow us to figure out the extra perimeter. Statement #1, by itself, is sufficient.

Statement #2: one of the dimensions of each garden is to be 24 feet.

Because we found that 24*40 = 960, we know 960/24 = 40. This leads to the same situation we had in #1, so statement #2, by itself, is sufficient.

Answer = D


Does that make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :)




MIke, the solution looks simpler after the explanation is read...so is it that whenever somebody says the a plot is divided equally in n divisions, we can calcualte teh area and then divide by it...is it always the method to do this type of problems?
_________________

Regards,
Harsha

Note: Give me kudos if my approach is right , else help me understand where i am missing.. I want to bell the GMAT Cat ;)

Satyameva Jayate - Truth alone triumphs

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4666
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2012, 14:34
GMATD11 wrote:
Can you pls show in a diagram how u use 80.according to my thought process width 80 ill remain unaffected.and we ill divide length 120 in 10 gardens


What you are doing is figuring out how to answer the prompt question in your own way, ignoring the two statements. In GMAT DS, that is a trap. Any answers you figure out to the prompt that are not allowed by the statements are not relevant to solving the question.

There are a number of ways to divide a 120 x 80 plot into 10 equal rectangles. As you said, we could have ten plots that were 80 x 12. We could also have ten plots that were 8 x 120. Both of those are possible, but neither is consistent with either statement, so for the purposes of solving this DS, both of those are 100% irrelevant.

Your job on DS is not to read the question and think for yourself how to solve the question. Your job, quite specifically, is to determine whether the statements, individually or together, will help you answer the question.

Remember: answering a DS question is very very different from solving a math problem. See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/introducti ... fficiency/

Does that make sense? Let me know if you have any questions.

Mike :)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4666
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2012, 14:51
harshavmrg wrote:
Mike, the solution looks simpler after the explanation is read...so is it that whenever somebody says the a plot is divided equally in n divisions, we can calculate the area and then divide by it...is it always the method to do this type of problems?


Dividing the area is one good strategy to have. Whenever you are dealing with larger numbers, thinking about those numbers in terms of their factors can be a helpful approach. We can't say, though, that this is the approach to use "always." Among other things --- every question about area is going to be different. The GMAC excels at creating new questions that do not resemble anything previously asked. You need to master the math content and have a flexible approach in terms of strategy.

Even if the question is about dividing up a plot, a real curveball can occur if it's possible to lay the rectangles going in two different ways.
Attachment:
garden divided into 16 equal rectangles.JPG
garden divided into 16 equal rectangles.JPG [ 25.35 KiB | Viewed 5766 times ]

In this diagram, which divides the 80 x 120 plot into 16 equal rectangles, not all going the same way. I checked for that in the above DS question, and saw that it wasn't possible, but I didn't go into that level of detail in my explanation. Technically, you should be on the lookout for alternate configurations like that, which means you can't simply divide. Nevertheless, questions in which those alternate geometric configurations of rectangles filling a plot are possible do strike me as a bit harder than what the GMAT would ask.

I realize that this is probably a more complicated answer than that for which you were hoping. Does all this make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: I will be back!
Joined: 13 Feb 2012
Posts: 60
Location: India
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2012, 19:50
stumped by the question. Went over from my head.
Thanks mike for explanation. +1
_________________

--shadab
Gmat FlashCard For Anki

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 09 Sep 2013
Posts: 7776
Premium Member
Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jul 2018, 14:46
Hello from the GMAT Club BumpBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

GMAT Books | GMAT Club Tests | Best Prices on GMAT Courses | GMAT Mobile App | Math Resources | Verbal Resources

Re: A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be &nbs [#permalink] 25 Jul 2018, 14:46
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A rectangular lot 120 feet long by 80 feet wide is to be

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.