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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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tt147 wrote:
Hi AjiteshArun

If we remove "will be" in option choice E and replace it with "would be", then would it still be correct ?

Hi tt147,

A would be won't be correct (predict is present tense, so will is appropriate). Try to use would to refer to the future from the perspective of the past (there are, of course, other ways to use would). For example:

1. NASA says that it will launch the rocket before the weather gets worse.

Now let's "backshift" everything in (1) to see how we'd normally use a would in such sentences:

2. NASA says said that it will would launch the rocket before the weather gets got worse.
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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mSKR wrote:
My question : When no verb is present in the end . It is understood to carry previous verb forward as elliptical. But in this case : this elliptical verb is : WILL BE Or the helping verb can be any ( was)

Hi mSKR,

The verb will be was (than the previous one was...). I'm not aware of any rule that limits us to will. It'd be great to see other opinions on this though.
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Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
AndrewN GMATNinja VeritasKarishma when time marker is used (previous ) then past perfect tense is correct so why can't in optionD it's correct like it's correct in below question
earlier used to denote action happened in past

According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come in for a 'soft landing', followed by a gradual increase in the business activity.
https://gmatclub.com/forum/according-to ... 70645.html
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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saby1410 wrote:
AndrewN GMATNinja VeritasKarishma when time marker is used (previous ) then past perfect tense is correct so why can't in optionD it's correct like it's correct in below question
earlier used to denote action happened in past

According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come in for a 'soft landing', followed by a gradual increase in the business activity.
https://gmatclub.com/forum/according-to ... 70645.html



saby1410 -
The two questions are different. Both give you the current views of the analysts, agreed. But look at what the views are:

1. According to some economists, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come in for a ‘soft landing’.

Earlier in the year - many had feared recession
But in the recent past, confidence has been growing and hence it is reflecting on the stock market now.
Hence the state of fear got over sometime in the past. So use of past perfect is correct.

2. Analysts and media executives predict that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one

Coming year will be no less challenging that the previous one.

There is no need to use past perfect here. We do not have two actions or points of time in the past. We are comparing the year that is coming with the year that has passed.
Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
Is predicting something a certain event?
Example- I predict that it would rain today.
So here I am not sure if it will rain or not, its just a prediction.
So using predict how can we use will?
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
correct IDIOM is predict that X. Will be the tense for future and simple present required instead of had been. So E is correct.
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
generis wrote:
Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be no less challenging than the previous one had been for the company's C.E.O.


(A) the coming year to be no less challenging than the previous one had been
Similar reasoning as B

(B) the coming year to be no less challenging compared to the previous one
that and will is required in the sentence to convey the intended meaning

(C) that the coming year would be no less challenging compared to the previous one
will is the right usage than would therefore out

(D) that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one had been
had been usage in the end is not required therefore out

(E) that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one
The meaning and tense is perfect therefore our answer

THerefore IMO E
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
AjiteshArun wrote:
RohitSaluja wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma GMATNinja AjiteshArun EducationAisle

I am not sure what exactly 'that' is doing in the sentence above, and whether it can be used to eliminate A and B. In below exampl usage of that is optional. Based on my understanding "that" can be optional if we have a seperate subject present inside the clause in below case "Irving" is that subject

1. The baboon Irving was feeding had an angry look about it

2. The baboon that Irving was feeding had an angry look about it

Coming back to the question isnt "the coming year" also the subject as "Irving" is in my example? if yes then isnt "that" optional and not the decision point to eliminate A and B. Appreciate your time on this.

Hi RohitSaluja,

This is more an idiomatic issue than something to do with that. Let's look at some of the ways we can use the verb predict:
1. predict + noun: They predicted the second wave.

2. predict + that-clause: They predicted that a second wave would occur. ← We could have dropped the that and gone with They predicted a second wave would occur.

We can use (2) in a passive construction as well:

3. It was predicted that a second wave would occur.

We can even use an infinitive in the passive:

4. A second wave was predicted to occur.

But we can't use predict + noun + infinitive:

5. They predicted the second wave to occur.


Why can't we use predict + noun + infinitive?
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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ali267 wrote:
AjiteshArun wrote:
RohitSaluja wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma GMATNinja AjiteshArun EducationAisle

I am not sure what exactly 'that' is doing in the sentence above, and whether it can be used to eliminate A and B. In below exampl usage of that is optional. Based on my understanding "that" can be optional if we have a seperate subject present inside the clause in below case "Irving" is that subject

1. The baboon Irving was feeding had an angry look about it

2. The baboon that Irving was feeding had an angry look about it

Coming back to the question isnt "the coming year" also the subject as "Irving" is in my example? if yes then isnt "that" optional and not the decision point to eliminate A and B. Appreciate your time on this.

Hi RohitSaluja,

This is more an idiomatic issue than something to do with that. Let's look at some of the ways we can use the verb predict:
1. predict + noun: They predicted the second wave.

2. predict + that-clause: They predicted that a second wave would occur. ← We could have dropped the that and gone with They predicted a second wave would occur.

We can use (2) in a passive construction as well:

3. It was predicted that a second wave would occur.

We can even use an infinitive in the passive:

4. A second wave was predicted to occur.

But we can't use predict + noun + infinitive:

5. They predicted the second wave to occur.


Why can't we use predict + noun + infinitive?


Hello ali267,

We hope this finds you well.

Having gone through the question and your query, we believe we can help resolve your doubt.

As mentioned by AjiteshArun, this matter is largely an idiomatic one; idiomatic conventions in the English language typically do not have firm reasoning behind them; rather, they are simply established rules that must be followed.

We hope this helps.
All the best!
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
Dear Experts,

I have a question for Option (E) that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one


Is a verb omitted ? Should it be " that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one was/would be " ???
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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Tanchat wrote:
I have a question for Option (E) that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one

Is a verb omitted ? Should it be " that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one was/would be " ???

Yes; it's really common to omit (assume) a verb after than, as long as there is no meaning ambiguity.

Example:

Peter earns more than Jack.

This is equivalent to:

Peter earns more than Jack (earns).

Michael's car is more expensive than Sam's car.

This is equivalent to:

Michael's car is more expensive than Sam's car (is).
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
EducationAisle wrote:
Tanchat wrote:
I have a question for Option (E) that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one

Is a verb omitted ? Should it be " that the coming year will be no less challenging than the previous one was/would be " ???

Yes; it's really common to omit (assume) a verb after than, as long as there is no meaning ambiguity.

Example:

Peter earns more than Jack.

This is equivalent to:

Peter earns more than Jack (earns).

Michael's car is more expensive than Sam's car.

This is equivalent to:

Michael's car is more expensive than Sam's car (is).


Thank you for the answer ! EducationAisle,

Could you elaborate a little bit more?
How can we omit the verb in this case : the previous one is the past. Thus, "will be" cannot fill here --> Then, verb cannot be omitted due to the different tense.
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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Tanchat wrote:
Could you elaborate a little bit more?
How can we omit the verb in this case : the previous one is the past. Thus, "will be" cannot fill here --> Then, verb cannot be omitted due to the different tense.

Indeed; however, an exception to this is when the verb being implied is a linking verb (most notably is/was/were). In such cases, the verb can be implied, despite the tense change.

Another official example:

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising corn and soybean prices.

Notice that the verb were is implied after the comparison operator, though the verb before the comparison operator is are.
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
EducationAisle wrote:
Tanchat wrote:
Could you elaborate a little bit more?
How can we omit the verb in this case : the previous one is the past. Thus, "will be" cannot fill here --> Then, verb cannot be omitted due to the different tense.

Indeed; however, an exception to this is when the verb being implied is a linking verb (most notably is/was/were). In such cases, the verb can be implied, despite the tense change.

Another official example:

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising corn and soybean prices.

Notice that the verb were is implied after the comparison operator, though the verb before the comparison operator is are.



Understood ! Thank you so much ! EducationAisle
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
Hi ,

I am little confused over the usage of will / would.

Option C: that the coming year would be no less challenging compared to the previous one.

It's a future prediction, not a certainty . Isn't use of would is correct?
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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EtaCarnia wrote:
Hi ,

I am little confused over the usage of will / would.

Option C: that the coming year would be no less challenging compared to the previous one.

It's a future prediction, not a certainty . Isn't use of would is correct?

Well, easiest way to eliminate C would be on the basis of "idiom". The correct idiom is:

Less....than
More....than
Greater....than
Lesser....than
Higher....than
Lower....than
More....than

Not the following:

Less...compared to

Generally would is used for fanciful scenarios (for example: If I were a millionaire, I would be a spendthrift).

Another usage of would is when sentence talks about the future, in the past.

So, both of the following sentences are correct:

John predicts that Stock market will perform well.
- John predicts (in the present) about the future and so, the sentence uses "will".

John predicted that Stock market would perform well.
- John predicted (in the past) about the future and so, the sentence uses "would".

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses usage of "would", its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Analysts and media executives predict the coming year to be [#permalink]
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EtaCarnia wrote:
Hi ,

I am little confused over the usage of will / would.

Option C: that the coming year would be no less challenging compared to the previous one.

It's a future prediction, not a certainty . Isn't use of would is correct?


Hello EtaCarnia,

We hope this finds you well.

To answer your query, since the sentence already uses the verb "predict", the use of "would" is actually redundant here.

We hope this helps.
All the best!
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