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Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First

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Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review 10th Edition, 2003

Practice Question
Question No.: RC 7 ~ 12
Page: 322


Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First, it is the poorest of the poor. Only paltry sums are available for excavating and even less is available for publishing the results and preserving the sites once excavated. Yet archaeologists deal with priceless objects every day. Second, there is the problem of illegal excavation, resulting in museum-quality pieces being sold to the highest bidder.

I would like to make an outrageous suggestion that would at one stroke provide funds for archaeology and reduce the amount of illegal digging. I would propose that scientific archeological expeditions and governmental authorities sell excavated artifacts on the open market. Such sales would provide substantial funds for the excavation and preservation of archaeological sites and the publication of results. At the same time, they would break the illegal excavator’s grip on the market, thereby decreasing the inducement to engage in illegal activities.

You might object that professionals excavate to acquire knowledge, not money. Moreover, ancient artifacts are part of our global cultural heritage, which should be available for all to appreciate, not sold to the highest bidder. I agree. Sell nothing that has unique artistic merit or scientific value. But, you might reply everything that comes out of the ground has scientific value. Here we part company. Theoretically, you may be correct in claiming that every artifact has potential scientific value. Practically, you are wrong.

I refer to the thousands of pottery vessels and ancient lamps that are essentially duplicates of one another. In one small excavation in Cyprus, archaeologists recently uncovered 2,000 virtually indistinguishable small jugs in a single courtyard. Even precious royal seal impressions known as l’melekh handles have been found in abundance—more than 4,000 examples so far.

The basements of museums are simply not large enough to store the artifacts that are likely to be discovered in the future. There is not enough money even to catalogue the finds; as a result, they cannot be found again and become as inaccessible as if they had never been discovered. Indeed, with the help of a computer, sold artifacts could be more accessible than are the pieces stored in bulging museum basements. Prior to sale, each could be photographed and the list of the purchasers could be maintained on the computer. A purchaser could even be required to agree to return the piece if it should become needed for scientific purposes.

It would be unrealistic to suggest that illegal digging would stop if artifacts were sold on the open market. But the demand for the clandestine product would be substantially reduced. Who would want an unmarked pot when another was available whose provenance was known, and that was dated stratigraphically by the professional archaeologist who excavated it?
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to propose

(A) an alternative to museum display of artifacts
(B) a way to curb illegal digging while benefiting the archaeological profession
(C) a way to distinguish artifacts with scientific value from those that have no such value
(D) the governmental regulation of archaeological sites
(E) a new system for cataloguing duplicate artifacts

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B


2. The author implies that all of the following statements about duplicate artifacts are true EXCEPT:

(A) A market for such artifacts already exists.
(B) Such artifacts seldom have scientific value.
(C) There is likely to be a continuing supply of such artifacts.
(D) Museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts.
(E) Such artifacts frequently exceed in quality those already catalogued in museum collections.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


3. Which of the following is mentioned in the passage as a disadvantage of storing artifacts in museum basements?

(A) Museum officials rarely allow scholars access to such artifacts.
(B) Space that could be better used for display is taken up for storage.
(C) Artifacts discovered in one excavation often become separated from each other.
(D) Such artifacts are often damaged by variations in temperature and humidity.
(E) Such artifacts’ often remain uncatalogued and thus cannot be located once they are put in storage.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


4. The author mentions the excavation in Cyprus (lines 31-34) to emphasize which of the following points?

(A) Ancient lamps and pottery vessels are less valuable, although more rare, than royal seal impressions.
(B) Artifacts that are very similar to each other present cataloguing difficulties to archaeologists.
(C) Artifacts that are not uniquely valuable, and therefore could be sold, are available in large quantities.
(D) Cyprus is the most important location for unearthing large quantities of salable artifacts.
(E) Illegal sales of duplicate artifacts are wide-spread, particularly on the island of Cyprus.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


5. The author’s argument concerning the effect of the official sale of duplicate artifacts on illegal excavation is based on which of the following assumptions?

(A) Prospective purchasers would prefer to buy authenticated artifacts.
(B) The price of illegally excavated artifacts would rise.
(C) Computers could be used to trace sold artifacts.
(D) Illegal excavators would be forced to sell only duplicate artifacts.
(E) Money gained from selling authenticated artifacts could be used to investigate and prosecute illegal excavators.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A


6. The author anticipates which of the following initial objections to the adoption of his proposal?

(A) Museum officials will become unwilling to store artifacts.
(B) An oversupply of salable artifacts will result and the demand for them will fall.
(C) Artifacts that would have been displayed in public places will be sold to private collectors.
(D) Illegal excavators will have an even larger supply of artifacts for resale.
(E) Counterfeiting of artifacts will become more commonplace.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


The author implies that which of the following would occur if duplicate artifacts were sold on the open market?

I. Illegal excavation would eventually cease completely.
II. Cyprus would become the primary source of marketable duplicate artifacts.
III. Archaeologists would be able to publish the results of their excavations more frequently than they currently do.

(A) I only
(B) III only
(C) I and II only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B

[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #1 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #2 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #3 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #4 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #5 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #6 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #7 OA

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Last edited by broall on 23 Jul 2017, 03:24, edited 1 time in total.
Added extra question 7

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B,E,E,C,A,C,B

The way Q 6 is worded, it sounds very ambiguous

Almost bit the bullet on the assumptuion Q, but ruled out when saw the word prosecute.

+1 for your interest and enthusiasm.

Thanks

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New post 03 Mar 2009, 23:22
1 - B
2 - E
3 - E
4 - C
5 - A
6 - E
7 - B

We can discuss the ones that are hard.

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New post 03 Mar 2009, 23:24
Thanks for doing this...I can improve in RC now
BEECACB my answers

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I tried too
It Was easy(atleast I got one such type in Real exam)
5 mins to read the passage and 4 mins for the 7 Qs

BBEC ACB
will post the OAs in few Hours
Might post RC no 2 soon :)
thanks guys for all the Kind words and support
nitya34 wrote:
=======================7 Qs..lets take 13 mins=======================================
Passage 11 (11/63)
Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First, it is the poorest of the poor. Only paltry sums are available for excavating and even less is available for publishing the results and preserving the sites once excavated. Yet archaeologists deal with priceless objects every day. Second, there is the problem of illegal excavation, resulting in museum-quality pieces being sold to the highest bidder.
I would like to make an outrageous suggestion that would at one stroke provide funds for archaeology and reduce the amount of illegal digging. I would propose that scientific archeological expeditions and governmental authorities sell excavated artifacts on the open market. Such sales would provide substantial funds for the excavation and preservation of archaeological sites and the publication of results. At the same time, they would break the illegal excavator’s grip on the market, thereby decreasing the inducement to engage in illegal activities.
You might object that professionals excavate to acquire knowledge, not money. Moreover, ancient artifacts are part of our global cultural heritage, which should be available for all to appreciate, not sold to the highest bidder. I agree. Sell nothing that has unique artistic merit or scientific value. But, you might reply everything that comes out of the ground has scientific value. Here we part company. Theoretically, you may be correct in claiming that every artifact has potential scientific value. Practically, you are wrong.
I refer to the thousands of pottery vessels and ancient lamps that are essentially duplicates of one another. In one small excavation in Cyprus, archaeologists recently uncovered 2,000 virtually indistinguishable small jugs in a single courtyard, Even precious royal seal impressions known as l’melekh handles have been found in abundance—more than 4,000 examples so far.
The basements of museums are simply not large enough to store the artifacts that are likely to be discovered in the future. There is not enough money even to catalogue the finds; as a result, they cannot be found again and become as inaccessible as if they had never been discovered. Indeed, with the help of a computer, sold artifacts could be more accessible than are the pieces stored in bulging museum basements. Prior to sale, each could be photographed and the list of the purchasers could be maintained on the computer. A purchaser could even be required to agree to return the piece if it should become needed for scientific purposes.
It would be unrealistic to suggest that illegal digging would stop if artifacts were sold on the open market. But the demand for the clandestine product would be substantially reduced. Who would want an unmarked pot when another was available whose provenance was known, and that was dated stratigraphically by the professional archaeologist who excavated it?
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to propose
(A) an alternative to museum display of artifacts
(B) a way to curb illegal digging while benefiting the archaeological profession
(C) a way to distinguish artifacts with scientific value from those that have no such value
(D) the governmental regulation of archaeological sites
(E) a new system for cataloguing duplicate artifacts
2. The author implies that all of the following statements about duplicate artifacts are true EXCEPT:
(A) A market for such artifacts already exists.
(B) Such artifacts seldom have scientific value.
(C) There is likely to be a continuing supply of such artifacts.
(D) Museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts.
(E) Such artifacts frequently exceed in quality those already catalogued in museum collections.
3. Which of the following is mentioned in the passage as a disadvantage of storing artifacts in museum basements?
(A) Museum officials rarely allow scholars access to such artifacts.
(B) Space that could be better used for display is taken up for storage.
(C) Artifacts discovered in one excavation often become separated from each other.
(D) Such artifacts are often damaged by variations in temperature and humidity.
(E) Such artifacts’ often remain uncatalogued and thus cannot be located once they are put in storage.
4. The author mentions the excavation in Cyprus (lines 31-34) to emphasize which of the following points?
(A) Ancient lamps and pottery vessels are less valuable, although more rare, than royal seal impressions.
(B) Artifacts that are very similar to each other present cataloguing difficulties to archaeologists.
(C) Artifacts that are not uniquely valuable, and therefore could be sold, are available in large quantities.
(D) Cyprus is the most important location for unearthing large quantities of salable artifacts.
(E) Illegal sales of duplicate artifacts are wide-spread, particularly on the island of Cyprus.
5. The author’s argument concerning the effect of the official sale of duplicate artifacts on illegal excavation is based on which of the following assumptions?
(A) Prospective purchasers would prefer to buy authenticated artifacts.
(B) The price of illegally excavated artifacts would rise.
(C) Computers could be used to trace sold artifacts.
(D) Illegal excavators would be forced to sell only duplicate artifacts.
(E) Money gained from selling authenticated artifacts could be used to investigate and prosecute illegal excavators.
6. The author anticipates which of the following initial objections to the adoption of his proposal?
(A) Museum officials will become unwilling to store artifacts.
(B) An oversupply of salable artifacts will result and the demand for them will fall.
(C) Artifacts that would have been displayed in public places will be sold to private collectors.
(D) Illegal excavators will have an even larger supply of artifacts for resale.
(E) Counterfeiting of artifacts will become more commonplace.
7. The author implies that which of the following would occur if duplicate artifacts were sold on the open market?
I. Illegal excavation would eventually cease completely.
II. Cyprus would become the primary source of marketable duplicate artifacts.
III. Archaeologists would be able to publish the results of their excavations more frequently than they currently do.
(A) I only
(B) III only
(C) I and II only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III
=============================

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2009, 00:25
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Nitya...thanks again 4 dis.
here r my answers
1 B
2 E
3 E
4 C
5 A
6 C
7 B
Total time taken : 7.5 min

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2009, 05:57
OAs are
1B
2E
3E
4C
5A
6C
7B

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2012, 02:35
Discussed in detail at the below mentioned link
archaeology-as-a-profession-faces-two-major-problems-first-76231.html#p573931


Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems.
First, it is the poorest of the poor. Only paltry
sums are available for excavating and even less is available
for publishing the results and preserving the sites
once excavated. Yet archaeologists deal with priceless
objects every day. Second, there is the problem of illegal
excavation, resulting in museum-quality pieces being
sold to the highest bidder.

I would like to make an outrageous suggestion that
would at one stroke provide funds for archaeology and
reduce the amount of illegal digging. I would propose
that scientific archaeological expeditions and governmental
authorities sell excavated artifacts on the open
market. Such sales would provide substantial funds for
the excavation and preservation of archaeological sites
and the publication of results. At the same time, they
would break the illegal excavator's grip on the market,
thereby decreasing the inducement to engage in illegal
activities.

You might object that professionals excavate to
acquire knowledge, not money. Moreover, ancient artifacts
are part of our global cultural heritage, which
should be available for all to appreciate, not sold to the
highest bidder. I agree. Sell nothing that has unique
artistic merit or scientific value. But, you might reply,
everything that comes out of the ground has scientific
value. Here we part company. Theoretically, you may be
correct in claiming that every artifact has potential scientific
value. Practically, you are wrong.

I refer to the thousands of pottery vessels and ancient
lamps that are essentially duplicates of one another. In
one small excavation in Cyprus, archaeologists recently
uncovered 2,000 virtually indistinguishable small jugs in
a single courtyard. Even precious royal seal impressions
known as/melekh handles have been found in abundance --
more than 4,000 examples so far.

The basements of museums are simply not large
enough to store the artifacts that are likely to be discovered
in the future. There is not enough money even to
catalogue the finds; as a result, they cannot be found
again and become as inaccessible as if they had never
been discovered. Indeed, with the help of a computer,
sold artifacts could be more accessible than are the
pieces stored in bulging museum basements. Prior to
sale, each could be photographed and the list of the
purchasers could be maintained on the computer. A
purchaser could even be required to agree to return the
piece if it should become needed for scientific purposes.
It would be unrealistic to suggest that illegal digging
would stop if artifacts were sold on the open market.
But the demand for the clandestine product would be
substantially reduced. Who would want an unmarked
pot when another was available whose provenance was
known, and that was dated stratigraphically by the
professional archaeologist who excavated it?


Hi,
I'm reading this passage and having issues identifying the correct answer choice for the following questions. If you could help me guide through the answer choices, that be great.
Many thanks!

*********************

The author implies that all of the following statements about duplicate artifacts are true EXCEPT:

A) A market for such artifacts already exists.

B) Such artifacts seldom have scientific value.

C) There is likely to be a continuing supply of such artifacts.

D) Museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts.

E) Such artifacts frequently exceed in quality those already catalogued in museum collections.

---------------------------------

The author's argument concerning the effect of the official sale of duplicate artifacts on illegal excavation is based on which of the following assumptions?

A) Prospective purchasers would prefer to buy authenticated artifacts.

B) The price of illegally excavated artifacts would rise.

C) Computers could be used to trace sold artifacts.

D) Illegal excavators would be forced to sell only duplicate artifacts.

E) Money gained from selling authenticated artifacts could be used to investigate and prosecute illegal excavators.

----------------------------------

The author mentions the excavation in Cyprus (lines 31-34) to emphasize which of the following points?

A) Ancient lamps and pottery vessels are less valuable, although more rare, than royal seal impressions.

B) Artifacts that are very similar to each other present cataloguing difficulties to archaeologists.

C) Artifacts that are not uniquely valuable, and therefore could be sold, are available in large quantities.

D) Cyprus is the most important location for unearthing large quantities of salable artifacts.

E) Illegal sales of duplicate artifacts are wide-spread, particularly on the island of Cyprus.

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New post 15 Nov 2012, 12:35
Archaeology is the study of past in the presence of physical evidences. In fact it explains the past. It is different from history subject because Archaeology helps us the built pages of history where as history depends on pages. Where history fails to provide the answers of our question, it helps us to find out our answers. I am also of the view that Archaeology profession is facing problems. It is time consuming and demands more money. Archaeologists spend most of their time in surveying and in surface collection. As you said Archaeologists deal with priceless objects every day and it can save sites from grave hunters too.You suggestion of providing funds for excavations is 100 % awesome and it can stopped illegal digging and John Marshal made good progress In this field. He provided Grid-Box pattern to make scientific excavations. If you know about the Marshal’s work in Archaeology then please share it with me.

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P1: 2 Major Problems (1) lack of funds and (2) illegal excavation

P2: Outrageous suggestion on how to solve both problems in P1

P3: Possible objection that archaelogical excavation is to acquire knowledge, not money; The author qualified the artifacts for open market as those with no unique artistic merit or scientific value; not all artifacts have scientific value

P4: Example of duplicate artifacts in large number

P5: storage problem in museum; difficult to catalogue; so sell those in duplicates; marked artifacts are preferred over illegally excavated artifacts



*********************

The author implies that all of the following statements about duplicate artifacts are true EXCEPT:

A) A market for such artifacts already exists.
there are bidders in the illegal market - Yes!

B) Such artifacts seldom have scientific value.
duplicate and not rare items come in super large quantities... Go to Paragraph 3 and then followed by examples in Paragraph 4 -Yes!

C) There is likely to be a continuing supply of such artifacts.
The author mentioned: "The basements of museums are simply not large enough to store the artifacts that are likely to be discovered
in the future." - Yes!


D) Museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts.
This one is a bit tricky. They mentioned an excavation in Cyprus with large supplies of duplicate artifacts. It wasn't mentioned that they were placed in Museum.. So I keep this - Yet I had doubt that this could be correct...

E) Such artifacts frequently exceed in quality those already catalogued in museum collections.
Now, quality.. this waasn't mentioned anywhere in the museum... The issue with catalogue was the difficulty of doing so..

Answer: E

The author's argument concerning the effect of the official sale of duplicate artifacts on illegal excavation is based on which of the following assumptions?

A) Prospective purchasers would prefer to buy authenticated artifacts.
This is in the last paragraph. "Who would want an unmarked
pot when another was available whose provenance was
known, and that was dated stratigraphically by the
professional archaeologist who excavated it?
"


B) The price of illegally excavated artifacts would rise.
Pricing was not mentioned anywhere... There was a mention of so called to the highest bidder but no such prediction of rising in price

C) Computers could be used to trace sold artifacts.
This is not one of the effects.... This was just mentioned to rest assure that sold artifacts are retrievable... This is something already occuring even before the proposal...

D) Illegal excavators would be forced to sell only duplicate artifacts.
The goal is to make illegal excavators decrease and not to sway them to sell a type of artifacts...

E) Money gained from selling authenticated artifacts could be used to investigate and prosecute illegal excavators.
Wow! This is nice but not mentioned.

Answer: A

The author mentions the excavation in Cyprus (lines 31-34) to emphasize which of the following points?

A) Ancient lamps and pottery vessels are less valuable, although more rare, than royal seal impressions.
These were mentioned to show the large supply of these artifacts.... Not to compare their value...

B) Artifacts that are very similar to each other present cataloguing difficulties to archaeologists.
Catalogue difficulty is because of lack of money

C) Artifacts that are not uniquely valuable, and therefore could be sold, are available in large quantities.
Bingo!

D) Cyprus is the most important location for unearthing large quantities of salable artifacts.
Wow! Not mentioned!

E) Illegal sales of duplicate artifacts are wide-spread, particularly on the island of Cyprus.[/quote]
Wow! No such association was made!

Answer: C
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Update: OG13 has questions 1,2,3 only. Questions 4,5,6,7 are removed from this edition. OG12 contains all these questions.
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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2013, 13:01
Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First, it is the poorest of the poor. Only paltry sums are available for excavating and even less is available for publishing the results and preserving the sites once excavated. Yet archaeologists deal with priceless objects every day. Second, there is the problem of illegal excavation, resulting in museum-quality pieces being sold to the highest bidder.

I would like to make an outrageous suggestion that would at one stroke provide funds for archaeology and reduce the amount of illegal digging. I would propose that scientific archaeological expeditions and governmental authorities sell excavated artifacts on the open market. Such sales would provide substantial funds for the excavation and preservation of archaeological sites and the publication of results. At the same time, they would break the illegal excavator's grip on the market, thereby decreasing the inducement to engage in illegal activities.

You might object that professionals excavate to acquire knowledge, not money. Moreover, ancient artifacts are part of our global cultural heritage, which should be available for all to appreciate, not sold to the highest bidder. I agree. Sell nothing that has unique artistic merit or scientific value. But, you might reply, everything that comes out of the ground has scientific value. Here we part company. Theoretically, you may be correct in claiming that every artifact has potential scientific value. Practically, you are wrong.

I refer to the thousands of pottery vessels and ancient lamps that are essentially duplicates of one another. In one small excavation in Cyprus, archaeologists recently uncovered 2,000 virtually indistinguishable small jugs in a single courtyard. Even precious royal seal impressions known as/melekh handles have been found in abundance -- more than 4,000 examples so far.

The basements of museums are simply not large enough to store the artifacts that are likely to be discovered in the future. There is not enough money even to catalogue the finds; as a result, they cannot be found again and become as inaccessible as if they had never been discovered. Indeed, with the help of a computer, sold artifacts could be more accessible than are the pieces stored in bulging museum basements. Prior to sale, each could be photographed and the list of the purchasers could be maintained on the computer. A purchaser could even be required to agree to return the piece if it should become needed for scientific purposes.

It would be unrealistic to suggest that illegal digging would stop if artifacts were sold on the open market. But the demand for the clandestine product would be substantially reduced. Who would want an unmarked pot when another was available whose provenance was known, and that was dated stratigraphically by the professional archaeologist who excavated it?
The primary purpose of the passage is to propose
(A) an alternative to museum display of artifacts
(B) a way to curb illegal digging while benefiting the archaeological profession
(C) a wayto distinguish artifacts with scientific value from those that have no such value
(D) the governmental regulation of archaeological sites
(E) a new system for cataloging duplicate artifacts

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B


The author implies that all of the following statements about duplicate artifacts are true EXCEPT
(A) a market for such artifacts already exists
(B) such artifacts seldom have scientific value
(C) there is likely to be a continuing supply of such artifacts
(D) museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts
(E) such artifacts frequently exceed in quality those already cataloged in museum collections

[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


Which of the following is mentioned in the passage as a disadvantage of storing artifacts in museum basements?
(A) Museum officials rarely allow scholars access to such artifacts.
(B) Space that could be better used for display is taken up for storage.
(C) Artifacts discovered in one excavation often become separated from each other.
(D) Such artifacts are often damaged by variations in temperature and humidity.
(E) Such artifacts often remain uncataloged and thus cannot be located once they are put in storage.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
E


The author mentions the excavation in Cyprus (paragraph 4) to emphasize which of the following points?
(A)Ancient lamps and pottery vessels are less valuable, although more rare, than royal seal impressions.
(B)Artifacts that are very similar to each other present cataloguing difficulties to archaeologists.
(C)Artifacts that are not uniquely valuable, and therefore could be sold, are available in large quantities.
(D)Cyprus is the most important location for unearthing large quantities of salable artifacts.
(E)Illegal sales of duplicate artifacts are wide-spread, particularly on the island of Cyprus.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


The author anticipates which of the following initial objections to the adoption of his proposal?
(A) Museum officials will become unwilling to store artifacts.
(B) An oversupply of salable artifacts will result and the demand for them will fall.
(C) Artifacts that would have been displayed in public places will be sold to private collectors.
(D) Illegal excavators will have an even larger supply of artifacts for resale.
(E) Counterfeiting of artifacts will become more commonplace.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


The author's argument concerning the effect of the official sale of duplicate artifacts on illegal excavation is based on which of the following assumptions?
(A)Prospective purchasers would prefer to buy authenticated artifacts.
(B)The price of illegally excavated artifacts would rise.
(C)Computers could be used to trace sold artifacts.
(D)Illegal excavators would be forced to sell only duplicate artifacts.
(E)Money gained from selling authenticated artifacts could be used to investigate and prosecute illegal excavators.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A


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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2013, 23:12
1 .B
2. A
3. E
??
Am I correct? OA Pls

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New post 22 Jun 2013, 17:45
suryanshg wrote:
1 .B
2. A
3. E
??
Am I correct? OA Pls


Questions 1 and 3 are right -- as for question 2:

(A) A market for such artifacts already exists
- this is implied most strongly at the end of the passage:
"The demand.. would be.. reduced. Who would want an unmarked pot when another was available..?"

(B) Such artifacts seldom have scientific value
- Paragraphs 3 and 4:
"Theoretically, you may be correct in claiming that every artifact has scientific value. Practically, you are wrong."
"... thousands of pottery vessels... essentially duplicates of one another"

(C) There is likely to be a continuing supply
- Paragraph 5:
"museums... not large enough to store the artifacts.. discovered in the future"

(D) Museums are well supplied with examples of such artifacts
- Paragraph 4:
"pottery vessels and ancient lamps... 2,000... small jugs... I'melekh handles... 4,000 examples..."

(E) is correct, as nothing is stated about quality.

:)
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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2013, 02:28
In OG 13 fot question 9 i.e question 6 in this post. I am confused between C and E, the author cites 2 examples of receiving such artifacts in abundance but are these 2 examples enough to say there would be a continuous supply???? Also the quality of the artifacts in comparison to the ones which are catalogued is not discussed.

Please weigh in!!!!

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New post 16 Aug 2013, 04:20
1 b
2 e --> I had to flip a coin between D and E
3 e
4 c
5 a
6 c
7 b

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2014, 11:58
Can someone please say the source of this question. In both 12th and 13th official guides there are only 3 questions.
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New post 18 May 2014, 01:22
nitya34 wrote:
OAs are
1B
2E
3E
4C
5A
6C
7B



Hi , can you explain the 6th question. I am not able to understand completely

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New post 20 Jun 2014, 07:10
Regarding Q 7. Where is there proof in the text to support this answer?
I chose it because there was not option to choose "none"

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2014, 23:18
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Explanation for Q6.

As stated in the passage "You might object that professionals excavate to acquire knowledge, not money. Moreover, ancient artifacts are part of our global cultural heritage, which should be available for all to appreciate, not sold to the highest bidder."

Option C says 'Artifacts that would have been displayed in public places will be sold to private collectors' . This option says that there could be an objection that artifacts would be would now not be displayed but sold. That's the initial objection that one can have for the author's suggestion.

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Re: Archaeology as a profession faces two major problems. First   [#permalink] 05 Oct 2014, 23:18

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