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During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a

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During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Mar 2011, 13:39
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53% (00:46) correct 47% (01:26) wrong based on 281 sessions

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During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging many vacationers from visiting the area.
(A) suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging
(B) suffered from a massive toad infestation and discouraged
(C) suffered a massive infestation of toads, which discouraged
(D) was suffering a massive infestation of toads and discouraging
(E) had suffered from a massive toad infestation and this discouraged

Please provide explanation for your answer choice.
Thanks for your response! :)

Originally posted by skbjunior on 28 Mar 2011, 17:41.
Last edited by skbjunior on 29 Mar 2011, 13:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A SC question  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2011, 00:12
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A participial modifier phrase following a comma, normally modifies the essence of the entire previous clause. As per that tenet, we can surmise that the Outer Banks and its sufferance of the infestation of toads all put together discouraged the vacationers. A seems to have no error either logically or grammatically.

But choice C can not be faulted, because the only objection to it that it is fouling the touch rule, has been overruled by GMAT as illustrated in the quoted example. As per that reasoning , it is legitimate to claim that the massive infestation of toads discouraged vacationers.

Quote:
Executives and federal officials say that the use of crack and cocaine is growing rapidly among workers, significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of more than $100 billion a year.

(A) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of

(B) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already cost business

(C) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, already with business costs of

(D) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costing business

(E) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costs business


As per OG explanation , option (B) is the correct answer, (wherein, the relative pronoun refers just not to abuse but to the effects of drug and alcohol abuse.)

So which one shall we take, A or C?

But does the question contain a choice using a participial modifier rather than the relative pronoun ‘which’? Had such a choice been there, would GMAT have still preferred the relative pronoun? I think no; at best the relative pronoun choice can be accepted as the best among the not so good ones in my opinion and still a participial modifier would have won if it had been there

I will convincingly prefer A
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Re: A SC question  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2011, 03:01
daagh wrote:
A participial modifier phrase following a comma, normally modifies the essence of the entire previous clause. As per that tenet, we can surmise that the Outer Banks and its sufferance of the infestation of toads all put together discouraged the vacationers. A seems to have no error either logically or grammatically.

But choice C can not be faulted, because the only objection to it that it is fouling the touch rule, has been overruled by GMAT as illustrated in the quoted example. As per that reasoning , it is legitimate to claim that the massive infestation of toads discouraged vacationers.

Quote:
Executives and federal officials say that the use of crack and cocaine is growing rapidly among workers, significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of more than $100 billion a year.

(A) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of

(B) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already cost business

(C) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, already with business costs of

(D) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costing business

(E) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costs business


As per OG explanation , option (B) is the correct answer, (wherein, the relative pronoun refers just not to abuse but to the effects of drug and alcohol abuse.)

So which one shall we take, A or C?

But does the question contain a choice using a participial modifier rather than the relative pronoun ‘which’? Had such a choice been there, would GMAT have still preferred the relative pronoun? I think no; at best the relative pronoun choice can be accepted as the best among the not so good ones in my opinion and still a participial modifier would have won if it had been there

I will convincingly prefer A


Thanks daagh! I appreciate your help.
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Re: A SC question  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2011, 06:51
+1 A

The situation was the cause, not the toads themselves.

OA?
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Re: A SC question  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2011, 12:40
daagh wrote:
A participial modifier phrase following a comma, normally modifies the essence of the entire previous clause. As per that tenet, we can surmise that the Outer Banks and its sufferance of the infestation of toads all put together discouraged the vacationers. A seems to have no error either logically or grammatically.

But choice C can not be faulted, because the only objection to it that it is fouling the touch rule, has been overruled by GMAT as illustrated in the quoted example. As per that reasoning , it is legitimate to claim that the massive infestation of toads discouraged vacationers.

Quote:
Executives and federal officials say that the use of crack and cocaine is growing rapidly among workers, significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of more than $100 billion a year.

(A) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of

(B) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already cost business

(C) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, already with business costs of

(D) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costing business

(E) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costs business


As per OG explanation , option (B) is the correct answer, (wherein, the relative pronoun refers just not to abuse but to the effects of drug and alcohol abuse.)

So which one shall we take, A or C?

But does the question contain a choice using a participial modifier rather than the relative pronoun ‘which’? Had such a choice been there, would GMAT have still preferred the relative pronoun? I think no; at best the relative pronoun choice can be accepted as the best among the not so good ones in my opinion and still a participial modifier would have won if it had been there

I will convincingly prefer A


Thanks for the explanation..are there any other Q's that u have seen based on such criteria as i am a little bit confused :roll:
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Re: A SC question  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2011, 19:29
Just one doubt. I have read that participle always take tense from verb.
During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging many vacationers from visiting the area.

What is tense for this.
During the summer of 2002,X, discouraging many vacationers from visiting the area.

Can anyone please explain the concept a little more.
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Re: During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2014, 13:38
Can we have OA / OE for this one PLEASE!

Cheers!
J :)

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Re: During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2015, 12:41
daagh wrote:
A participial modifier phrase following a comma, normally modifies the essence of the entire previous clause. As per that tenet, we can surmise that the Outer Banks and its sufferance of the infestation of toads all put together discouraged the vacationers. A seems to have no error either logically or grammatically.

But choice C can not be faulted, because the only objection to it that it is fouling the touch rule, has been overruled by GMAT as illustrated in the quoted example. As per that reasoning , it is legitimate to claim that the massive infestation of toads discouraged vacationers.

Quote:
Executives and federal officials say that the use of crack and cocaine is growing rapidly among workers, significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of more than $100 billion a year.

(A) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of

(B) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already cost business

(C) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, already with business costs of

(D) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costing business

(E) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costs business


As per OG explanation , option (B) is the correct answer, (wherein, the relative pronoun refers just not to abuse but to the effects of drug and alcohol abuse.)

So which one shall we take, A or C?

But does the question contain a choice using a participial modifier rather than the relative pronoun ‘which’? Had such a choice been there, would GMAT have still preferred the relative pronoun? I think no; at best the relative pronoun choice can be accepted as the best among the not so good ones in my opinion and still a participial modifier would have won if it had been there

I will convincingly prefer A



HI Daagh,

I was initially tempted with A as correct choice but dropped it because of incorrect usage of Idiom Suffer
Suffer from is the correct usage that why i Picked B

Please let me know what am I missing here
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Re: During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2015, 14:50
kanigmat011 wrote:
daagh wrote:
A participial modifier phrase following a comma, normally modifies the essence of the entire previous clause. As per that tenet, we can surmise that the Outer Banks and its sufferance of the infestation of toads all put together discouraged the vacationers. A seems to have no error either logically or grammatically.

But choice C can not be faulted, because the only objection to it that it is fouling the touch rule, has been overruled by GMAT as illustrated in the quoted example. As per that reasoning , it is legitimate to claim that the massive infestation of toads discouraged vacationers.

Quote:
Executives and federal officials say that the use of crack and cocaine is growing rapidly among workers, significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of more than $100 billion a year.

(A) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already are a cost to business of

(B) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which already cost business

(C) significantly compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, already with business costs of

(D) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costing business

(E) significant in compounding the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, and already costs business


As per OG explanation , option (B) is the correct answer, (wherein, the relative pronoun refers just not to abuse but to the effects of drug and alcohol abuse.)

So which one shall we take, A or C?

But does the question contain a choice using a participial modifier rather than the relative pronoun ‘which’? Had such a choice been there, would GMAT have still preferred the relative pronoun? I think no; at best the relative pronoun choice can be accepted as the best among the not so good ones in my opinion and still a participial modifier would have won if it had been there

I will convincingly prefer A



HI Daagh,

I was initially tempted with A as correct choice but dropped it because of incorrect usage of Idiom Suffer
Suffer from is the correct usage that why i Picked B

Please let me know what am I missing here


During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging many vacationers from visiting the area.
(A) suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging
(B) suffered from a massive toad infestation and discouraged
(C) suffered a massive infestation of toads, which discouraged
(D) was suffering a massive infestation of toads and discouraging
(E) had suffered from a massive toad infestation and this discouraged

IMHO-- in B if you see Outer Banks suffered x and discouraged many vacationers from visiting the area. Well, thats not the case, it is the toad infestation that discouraged. Only in A, discouraging is correctly modifying .
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Re: During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2018, 14:49
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During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging many vacationers from visiting the area.
(A) suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging
I like better the option "suffered a massive infestation of toads, discouraging", but this one is the only one right anyway.
(B) suffered from a massive toad infestation and discouraged
"Discourage" is dependent on "suffered". These two verbs can not be parallel. Because suffered, thus discouraged
(C) suffered a massive infestation of toads, which discouraged
"Which" - we can use it as a modifier to a word not to a phrase like "the Outer Banks suffered a massive infestation of toads"
(D) was suffering a massive infestation of toads and discouraging
Same as in B - these two verbs can not be parallel
(E) had suffered from a massive toad infestation and this discouraged
No past perfect. And again - "this" to a whole phrase.
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Re: During the summer of 2002, the Outer Banks suffered a &nbs [#permalink] 18 Dec 2018, 14:49
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