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Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen

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New post Updated on: 16 Jun 2019, 06:15
2
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A
B
C
D
E

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Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to its knees.

(A) water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to
(B) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down
(C) water and oil crises are about to bring the country's economy to
(D) water crisis is about to bring the country's economy to
(E) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down to

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Originally posted by HardWorkBeatsAll on 31 Aug 2015, 07:36.
Last edited by gmat1393 on 16 Jun 2019, 06:15, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 31 Aug 2015, 08:19
crisis is a wrong diction to describe two factors of crisis. The right diction is 'crises"; only C
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New post 31 Aug 2015, 09:47
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Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to its knees.[/b]

(A) water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to
(B) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down
(C) water and oil crises are about to bring the country's economy to
(D) water crisis is about to bring the country's economy to
(E) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down to


Another sharp one from economist!

There was another one by economist which played with thesIs and thesES.

Crisis -singular
Crises- Plural
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New post 07 Sep 2015, 00:32
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Thank you samichange, daagh!

Do you have other examples that we can collate here for commonly mistaken words/plurals?
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New post 23 Apr 2018, 05:06
really appriciate this paltform because of another GMAT membership part, i have pretty currently found this big factor, yet it had no talk for over a year. i'm presently knocking it up - doing my interest.
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New post 03 Mar 2019, 22:52
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A – SV disagreement, there is only one crisis so “are” should be “is”
B – “down” is redundant.
D – fails to mention the oil part of the crisis
E – same as B

So, C is the right answer.
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New post Updated on: 15 Oct 2019, 02:46
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I am confused about this question.
the long-foreseen water and oil crises are about to bring the country's economy to its knees.

We have plural subjective in the front, but here is "its" in the hinder.
How it works?

Originally posted by momoyi on 15 Oct 2019, 01:59.
Last edited by momoyi on 15 Oct 2019, 02:46, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 15 Oct 2019, 02:19
momoyi wrote:
I am confused about this question.
the long-foreseen water and oil crises are about to bring the country's economy to its knees.

We have plural subjective in the front, but here is "its" in the hinder.
How it is work?


Have the same question.

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New post 15 Oct 2019, 02:43
We need plural here as the effect is on water and oil (both of them)
crisis- singular
crises - plural
Based on this, A,B D and E can be eliminated.
C it is.


Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to its knees.

(A) water and oil crisis are about to bring the country's economy to
(B) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down
(C) water and oil crises are about to bring the country's economy to
(D) water crisis is about to bring the country's economy to
(E) water and oil crisis is about to bring the country's economy down to
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Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2019, 07:48
Does Official GMAT test such trivial things ever EMPOWERgmatRichC??

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New post 15 Oct 2019, 14:17
Hi bodhisattva800,

In basic terms, this is a remarkably rare grammar issue - so to answer your question: NO, you probably will not face an SC on the Official GMAT that comes down to determining the rare plural form of a noun. In addition, getting one SC wrong on the GMAT will never 'kill' your Score (and nobody has gotten rejected from a Top10 School for missing 1 rare SC on the GMAT). Before getting too worked up about this type of situation, you should really analyze how you performed on all of the other SCs you faced. On your last CAT, how many 'gettable' SCs did you miss? Are you clear on WHY you got those questions wrong (and will you be able to correctly answer similar questions in the future?)?

That all having been said, there are plenty of 'context clues' that can help you to determine the correct answer to this question (or at the very least, take an educated guess).

1) "....DAMAGES..... water AND oil....." We have more than one 'damage' - and we're dealing with the word "and" between "water" and "oil" - which means that we're almost certainly dealing with more than one crisis. The plural subject means that the verb "are" is required. Eliminate Answers B, D and E.

2) The answers to SCs do not include spelling errors or 'made up' words, so "crises" IS a word. You might not be sure what the plural form of 'crisis' actually is... but I personally have only ever used the word "crisis" as a singular noun (for example, "the crisis", "a crisis", etc.), so I would certainly have to consider the idea that "crises" was its plural. We already know that we're dealing with a plural, so even if I wasn't 100% sure - between the two remaining answers, I'd have to go with C.

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 08:18
daagh wrote:
crisis is a wrong diction to describe two factors of crisis. The right diction is 'crises"; only C



In this quesions, Isn't " its " in 'down to its knees' referring to country? If yes, here country is a possesive noun as per my understanding, so can a possesive noun be an antecedent to a pronoun?
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 04:23
Rishbha wrote:
daagh wrote:
crisis is a wrong diction to describe two factors of crisis. The right diction is 'crises"; only C



In this quesions, Isn't " its " in 'down to its knees' referring to country? If yes, here country is a possesive noun as per my understanding, so can a possesive noun be an antecedent to a pronoun?


The pronoun its refers to the noun economy.
The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to its knees.
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New post Updated on: 18 Oct 2019, 05:27
GMATNinja daagh or anyone else who might be able to help...

1) Would answer choice E be correct if "down" were removed from the sentence? Is there anything else wrong with the answer choice E?

2) Also is the phrase "water and oil crisis" singular? and hence should it take "is" as a verb?

Thanks in advance!!

Originally posted by Kritisood on 18 Oct 2019, 05:19.
Last edited by Kritisood on 18 Oct 2019, 05:27, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 05:23
SudsMeister wrote:
Rishbha wrote:
daagh wrote:
crisis is a wrong diction to describe two factors of crisis. The right diction is 'crises"; only C



In this quesions, Isn't " its " in 'down to its knees' referring to country? If yes, here country is a possesive noun as per my understanding, so can a possesive noun be an antecedent to a pronoun?


The pronoun its refers to the noun economy.
The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to its knees.


The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to economy's knees
is that right?
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 06:00
Kritisood wrote:
GMATNinja daagh or anyone else who might be able to help...

1) Would answer choice E be correct if "down" were removed from the sentence? Is there anything else wrong with the answer choice E?

2) Also is the phrase "water and oil crisis" singular? and hence should it take "is" as a verb?

Thanks in advance!!


As per my thoughts:

1) The phrase - bring something to its knees means to weaken the condition of something. Thus, without the adverb down, the sentence still conveys the intended meaning. In this particular question, assuming all the other parts of E are correct, the adverb down is a very narrow difference and a question wouldn't use it as deciding factor between two choices.

2) There are some compound subjects that take a singular verb, such as bed and breakfast. When two nouns are intended to express jointly a single idea, the verb used is singular. For example: Bread and butter is my favourite breakfast. Bread and butter express a single food item.
However, in option E, water and oil is not a phrase that is intended to express or is usually accepted as a single idea. This makes it a compound subject that has two separate subjects, implying that we should use the plural form of crisis i.e. crises. A plural verb should follow crises.
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 07:28
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momoyi wrote:
SudsMeister wrote:

The pronoun its refers to the noun economy.
The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to its knees.


The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to economy's knees
is that right?


Literally, it doesn't seem right. The phrase bring someone/something to their/its knees means to weaken someone's/something's condition.
It figuratively suggests that someone/something is made to kneel. The act of kneeling implies weakening or submission.
For example: Hermione's punch brought Draco to his knees.
In this sentence his refers to Draco and if we try and substitute it, the sentence becomes: Hermione's punch brought Draco to Draco's knees.
Does this sound alright? Perhaps, literally, no. But it is a grammatically correct phrase to suggest that - Hermione's punch weakened Draco.

A few similar examples where the possessive pronoun is replaced:
An army marches on its stomach would be converted to An army marches on army's stomach. The former is a grammatically correct idiom that means a well-fed army is more effective. The latter's meaning is completely different and nonsensical.

Voldemort is on his last legs would be converted to Voldemort is on Voldemort's last legs. The former means to be collapsing/breaking down/near to death. The latter seems nonsensical.

Any wizard/witch worth his/her salt knows that Dumbledore cannot be defeated even with the Elder Wand would be converted to Any wizard/witch worth wizard's/witch's salt knows that Dumbledore cannot be defeated even with the Elder Wand. The former refers to any wizard/witch who is competent and/or worthy of respect. The latter seems nonsensical.

So, I think that in some cases possessive pronouns cannot be replaced with their referent nouns to check for grammatical accuracy.
I also think that the GMAT does not expect a candidate to identify and to know the meaning of all English idioms/phrases.

In cases where the replacement does not make sense, there would be more glaring errors (SVA/Parallelism etc.) to help out. Sometimes, after splitting the answer choices, each of the surviving choices contain the same form of the idiom, making the replacement technique inadequate.
Such as in this Q its is outside the underlined portion and in each choice the nearest noun before its is the country's economy.
This is a good enough signal that identifying the antecedent to its will not be enough to eliminate the choices and that we need to look for something more.
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 22:48
SudsMeister wrote:
momoyi wrote:
SudsMeister wrote:

The pronoun its refers to the noun economy.
The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to its knees.


The crises directly affect the economy and thus will bring the economy to economy's knees
is that right?


Literally, it doesn't seem right. The phrase bring someone/something to their/its knees means to weaken someone's/something's condition.
It figuratively suggests that someone/something is made to kneel. The act of kneeling implies weakening or submission.
For example: Hermione's punch brought Draco to his knees.
In this sentence his refers to Draco and if we try and substitute it, the sentence becomes: Hermione's punch brought Draco to Draco's knees.
Does this sound alright? Perhaps, literally, no. But it is a grammatically correct phrase to suggest that - Hermione's punch weakened Draco.

A few similar examples where the possessive pronoun is replaced:
An army marches on its stomach would be converted to An army marches on army's stomach. The former is a grammatically correct idiom that means a well-fed army is more effective. The latter's meaning is completely different and nonsensical.

Voldemort is on his last legs would be converted to Voldemort is on Voldemort's last legs. The former means to be collapsing/breaking down/near to death. The latter seems nonsensical.

Any wizard/witch worth his/her salt knows that Dumbledore cannot be defeated even with the Elder Wand would be converted to Any wizard/witch worth wizard's/witch's salt knows that Dumbledore cannot be defeated even with the Elder Wand. The former refers to any wizard/witch who is competent and/or worthy of respect. The latter seems nonsensical.

So, I think that in some cases possessive pronouns cannot be replaced with their referent nouns to check for grammatical accuracy.
I also think that the GMAT does not expect a candidate to identify and to know the meaning of all English idioms/phrases.

In cases where the replacement does not make sense, there would be more glaring errors (SVA/Parallelism etc.) to help out. Sometimes, after splitting the answer choices, each of the surviving choices contain the same form of the idiom, making the replacement technique inadequate.
Such as in this Q its is outside the underlined portion and in each choice the nearest noun before its is the country's economy.
This is a good enough signal that identifying the antecedent to its will not be enough to eliminate the choices and that we need to look for something more.



thanks so much! Finally, I figure out what's that mean.
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Re: Despite all attempts to curb the damages, the long-foreseen   [#permalink] 18 Oct 2019, 22:48
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