It is currently 18 Oct 2017, 17:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jan 2009
Posts: 325

Kudos [?]: 176 [0], given: 5

History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2009, 02:23
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons for this are clear: new discoveries of documents and remains, the discovery of mistaken inferences in prior histories, the discovery of previously unnoticed relationships among data, and the application of hitherto undiscovered principles of natural science all may indicate inadequacies in current history texts. Any of these considerations may require that the past be reinterpreted in a manner that is new and more illuminating.
Which one of the following can be inferred from the argument in the passage?
(A) The interpretation of historical events is affected by natural science.
(B) The past is constantly renewed because of illuminating reinterpretations.
(C) History books are outdated as soon as they are written.
(D) Natural scientists also function as historians.
(E) Historians’ mistaken inferences are caused by unnoticed relationships among data.

Can u please explain?

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA. A

Kudos [?]: 176 [0], given: 5

VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1402

Kudos [?]: 437 [0], given: 1

Re: LSAT - CR [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2009, 07:20
tkarthi4u wrote:
History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons for this are clear: new discoveries of documents and remains, the discovery of mistaken inferences in prior histories, the discovery of previously unnoticed relationships among data, and the application of hitherto undiscovered principles of natural science all may indicate inadequacies in current history texts. Any of these considerations may require that the past be reinterpreted in a manner that is new and more illuminating.
Which one of the following can be inferred from the argument in the passage?
(A) The interpretation of historical events is affected by natural science.
(B) The past is constantly renewed because of illuminating reinterpretations. absurd
(C) History books are outdated as soon as they are written. Extreme
(D) Natural scientists also function as historians. Extreme
(E) Historians’ mistaken inferences are caused by unnoticed relationships among data. Combines two different events. not necessary

Can u please explain?

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA. A



A remains and is perfect. See green above.

Kudos [?]: 437 [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 May 2009
Posts: 168

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 3

Re: LSAT - CR [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Jun 2009, 12:03
tkarthi4u wrote:
History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons for this are clear: new discoveries of documents and remains, the discovery of mistaken inferences in prior histories, the discovery of previously unnoticed relationships among data, and the application of hitherto undiscovered principles of natural science all may indicate inadequacies in current history texts. Any of these considerations may require that the past be reinterpreted in a manner that is new and more illuminating.
Which one of the following can be inferred from the argument in the passage?
(A) The interpretation of historical events is affected by natural science.
(B) The past is constantly renewed because of illuminating reinterpretations.
(C) History books are outdated as soon as they are written.
(D) Natural scientists also function as historians.
(E) Historians’ mistaken inferences are caused by unnoticed relationships among data.

Can u please explain?


On these types of must be true questions, I usually go for the weakest argument, which in this case is (A). The original info says "application of hitherto undiscovered principles of natural science all may indicate inadequacies in current history texts." To Indicate inadequacies can also be more generally described as "to affect", (A) is a statement that can't be wrong according to the info.

B - We don't know how often historical reinterpretations occur, so we can't say its "constantly" renewed.
C - We don't know how often they go out of date either, there is no specific time frame of occurrence given in the original info.
D - They might, but we don't know. We just know their principles are applied to history, we don't know who is applying those principles.
E - I think the original info would suggest that mistaken references are also caused by other factors (i.e. inadequate scientific knowledge).

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 3

Re: LSAT - CR   [#permalink] 23 Jun 2009, 12:03
Display posts from previous: Sort by

History textbooks frequently need to be revised. The reasons

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.