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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in

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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2015, 15:17
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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians
B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties
C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide
D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups
E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years

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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2015, 15:31
Harley1980 wrote:
In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians
B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties
C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide
D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups
E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years


Hi Harley,
Can you please explain why choice B is correct?

Thanks
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Re: In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2015, 10:46
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Mo2men wrote:
Harley1980 wrote:
In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians
B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties
C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide
D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups
E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years


Hi Harley,
Can you please explain why choice B is correct?

Thanks


Hello Mo2men

The argument make a comparison by using total numbers and this is incorrect.
For example in country A we have 100 fatalities and in country B 1000 fatalities
Looks like country A is much safer but what if in country A live on 200 people and in country B 1000000 people? B is much safer in these case.

Conclusion of the argument is wrong because California is less when USA so 4,736 fatalities in California lead to the much bigger rate of fatalities per person than 4,810 nationwide.

The answer B says that if we make this comparison per 1000 person then we will see that conclusion is wrong.
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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2015, 11:46
Quote:
The argument make a comparison by using total numbers and this is incorrect.
For example in country A we have 100 fatalities and in country B 1000 fatalities
Looks like country A is much safer but what if in country A live on 200 people and in country B 1000000 people? B is much safer in these case.

Conclusion of the argument is wrong because California is less when USA so 4,736 fatalities in California lead to the much bigger rate of fatalities per person than 4,810 nationwide.


In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians(They are taken combined. Negates the premise.)

B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties

C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide(We have fatalities of all accidents in California not of only motorcycle accidents.)

D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups(We don't have fatalities Nationwide.)

E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years(This is not true acc to argument.)

So remaining only B but selected C missing the above logic.
Can you explain option C?
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In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2015, 14:49
Mechmeera wrote:
Quote:
The argument make a comparison by using total numbers and this is incorrect.
For example in country A we have 100 fatalities and in country B 1000 fatalities
Looks like country A is much safer but what if in country A live on 200 people and in country B 1000000 people? B is much safer in these case.

Conclusion of the argument is wrong because California is less when USA so 4,736 fatalities in California lead to the much bigger rate of fatalities per person than 4,810 nationwide.


In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians(They are taken combined. Negates the premise.)

B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties

C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide(We have fatalities of all accidents in California not of only motorcycle accidents.)

D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups(We don't have fatalities Nationwide.)

E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years(This is not true acc to argument.)

So remaining only B but selected C missing the above logic.
Can you explain option C?


Hello Mechmeera

We need to compare motorcycle fatalities in USA with car fatalities in California and decide what is more often in terms of probability. So comparison of motorcycle fatalities of USA and California does not help.

For example we have 200 motorcycle fatalities in California and 4610 in USA.
This information does not influence logical flaw in the argument because it still has an error of comparison total numbers from absolutely different areas with different number of people.

Actually we can make inference from this information that California is less than USA so possibily the comparison is wrong but firstly this is a little too far for CR question and secondly B makes it in a more direct way.
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Re: In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2015, 23:32
Harley1980 wrote:
In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in California. That year, there were 4,810 deaths caused by motorcycle accidents nationwide. Officials in the Department of Transportation hypothesized that in 2006, it was not much safer to be a driver or a pedestrian in California than it was to be a motorcyclist anywhere in the USA.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

A) Comparing the number of fatalities seperately for drivers and for pedestrians
B) Comparing the number of casualties in each group per 1,000 people, instead of the total number of casualties
C) Comparing the number of fatalities in Californian motorcycle accidents to the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents nationwide
D) Calculating the ratio between the fatality totals in both groups
E) Comparing the 2006 statistics with statistics of previous years


Again, one more time, Question stem played the critical role in solving the question.

Which of the following investigations is most likely to expose a logical flaw in the above hypothesis?

If B is provided, we will be able to EXPOSE the logical flaw easily.
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Re: In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in  [#permalink]

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Re: In 2006, there were 4,736 fatalities caused by road accidents in   [#permalink] 31 Jan 2019, 10:40
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