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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers

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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2006, 14:39
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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers have traditionally been pollinated by hand, which has kept palm fruit productivity unnaturally low. When weevils known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into Asia in 1980, palm fruit productivity increased — by up to 50 percent in some areas — but then decreased sharply in 1984.

Which of the following statements, if true, would best explain the 1984 decrease in productivity?

(A) Prices for palm fruit fell between 1980 and 1984 following the rise in production and a concurrent fall in demand.

(B) Imported trees are often more productive than native trees becasue the imported ones have left behind their pests and diseases in their native lands.

(C) Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.

(D) The weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1980 and 1984

(E) Prior to 1980 another species of insect pollinated the Asian palm trees, but not as efficiently as the species of weevil that was introduced in 1980

[Reveal] Spoiler:
please explain the chosen answer
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2006, 19:21
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C would explain this as the increase in productivity resulted in depletion of nutrients.

A comes close but deals with supply and demand and how it affected price - and does not relate to productivity that is controlled by weevils (and not supply and demand)

The other options are gibberish

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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2006, 21:37
Definitely C.
A-----> Talks about price, supply-demand but does not explain the 1984 decrease in productivity.
B----->Imported plants are more productive. So what, again no valid reason.
C----->Okie..productivity increased---nutrients got delpeted---productivity again fell due to that.
D----->No valid reason again.
E----->It explains the increase in production after 1980.

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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2006, 21:59
Hey I was caught between B& C:
Why B? : its written that weevils were introduced into Asia => they were imported and then the sentence said the imported tree are often more productive since they leave behind their pests as well as diseases.. now soonafter these pests and diseases will recur in the new land leading to the decrease in the productivity ..
why C?: since there was a rapid increase in the productivity of flower trees .. the nutrients might have depleted at a faster pace leading to decrease in productivity in the later yrs..

In B, I seem to infer too much ..
Should go with C..
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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2006, 03:41
Will go with C

All the options are either out of scope or provide erroneous information.
C provides a valid point that since palm tree fruits decreased, numbers of trees created decreased.

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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2011, 21:14
u2lover wrote:
In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers have traditionally been pollinated by hand, which has kept palm fruit productivity unnaturally low. When weevils known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into Asia in 1980, palm fruit productivity increased -- by up to 50 percent in some areas -- but then decreased sharply in 1984.

Which of the following statements, if true, would best explain the 1984 decrease in productivity?

Palm Fruit Productivity = (Number of Palms fruits produced)/(Total number of Palm fruits created)
(A) Prices for palm fruit fell between 1980 and 1984 following the rise in production and a concurrent fall in demand.
Price not the Number - So Wrong comparison
(B) Imported trees are often more productive than native trees becasue the imported ones have left behind their pests and diseases in their native lands.
Imported Trees - Native trees comparison no effect on (Number of Palms fruits produced) or (Total number of Palm fruits created)
(C) Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.
Female flowers less - (Number of Palms fruits produced) is less - Yes
(D) The weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1980 and 1984
Weevil = constant - Prod. should increase - Not correct
(E) Prior to 1980 another species of insect pollinated the Asian palm trees, but not as efficiently as the species of weevil that was introduced in 1980
Weevils compared with other insects - Wrong comparison
please explain the chosen answer

This is a Resolve a paradox question

My comments inline.
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Re: In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2017, 14:47
In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers have traditionally been pollinated by hand, which has kept palm fruit productivity unnaturally low. When weevils known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into Asia in 1980, palm fruit productivity increased — by up to 50 percent in some areas — but then decreased sharply in 1984.

Which of the following statements, if true, would best explain the 1984 decrease in productivity?

(A) Prices for palm fruit fell between 1980 and 1984 following the rise in production and a concurrent fall in demand.
the demand of the palm fruit s out of scope for this argument.

(B) Imported trees are often more productive than native trees becasue the imported ones have left behind their pests and diseases in their native lands. if tha is the case then the trees should continwe to produce, although this is out of scope because this does not address the reason why it declined.

(C) Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.Correct explaination for the resaon why the production declined

(D) The weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1980 and 1984this further creates distance between premise and conclusion

(E) Prior to 1980 another species of insect pollinated the Asian palm trees, but not as efficiently as the species of weevil that was introduced in 1980 argument does not talk about insects prior to 1980

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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2017, 23:39
GMATNinja
Quick doubt regarding D.
In D, the question states that the population remained the same between 1980-1984. Between, doesn't include 1984.
But in 1984, the population could have decreased... Please explain what am I missing here?

abhishekdadarwal2009 wrote:
In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers have traditionally been pollinated by hand, which has kept palm fruit productivity unnaturally low. When weevils known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into Asia in 1980, palm fruit productivity increased — by up to 50 percent in some areas — but then decreased sharply in 1984.

Which of the following statements, if true, would best explain the 1984 decrease in productivity?

(A) Prices for palm fruit fell between 1980 and 1984 following the rise in production and a concurrent fall in demand.
the demand of the palm fruit s out of scope for this argument.

(B) Imported trees are often more productive than native trees becasue the imported ones have left behind their pests and diseases in their native lands. if tha is the case then the trees should continwe to produce, although this is out of scope because this does not address the reason why it declined.

(C) Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.Correct explaination for the resaon why the production declined

(D) The weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1980 and 1984this further creates distance between premise and conclusion

(E) Prior to 1980 another species of insect pollinated the Asian palm trees, but not as efficiently as the species of weevil that was introduced in 1980 argument does not talk about insects prior to 1980

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 87

In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers   [#permalink] 25 Oct 2017, 23:39
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In Asia, where palm trees are non-native, the trees' flowers

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