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In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported

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In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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OG2013 CR Q # 72
OG2017 CR634 P536

In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. Malvernia currently produces more natural gas each year than it uses, and oil production in Malvernian oil fields is increasing at a steady pace. If these trends in fuel production and usage continue, therefore, Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel is likely to decline soon.

Which of the following would it be most useful to establish in evaluating the argument?

(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas?
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil?
(C) What proportion of Malvernia's total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power?
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation increasing?
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning heating systems?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2015, 02:23
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


I actually understand this reasoning, but I can't drift away from considering (B) a valid option. I mean, if we evaluate this statement: Malvernia is a country that rely on imported oil. I was indecisive between (B) and (D) and eventually went with (B), it kinda makes sense, no? What if it relies heavily on imported oil, say, for any other production.

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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erikvm wrote:
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


I actually understand this reasoning, but I can't drift away from considering (B) a valid option. I mean, if we evaluate this statement: Malvernia is a country that rely on imported oil. I was indecisive between (B) and (D) and eventually went with (B), it kinda makes sense, no? What if it relies heavily on imported oil, say, for any other production.


So we already know that Malvernia relies heavily on foreign oil, that is given. Answer choice B only addresses other countries, and whether they rely more or less on foreign oil. Other countries don't matter at all, and that puts B very much out of scope.

I hope this helps!
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2015, 01:39
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


can not say a word for this excellent explanation. general approach to evaluate question is clear now. Thank you
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2015, 04:26
carcass wrote:
Please before tyo post a question from OG use the search button

It was already discussed on the board

Here you can find Official Guide Verbal Question Directory (OG 13 and OG 2)

Thank for your collaboration to keep the forum clean

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Hi Carcass,

The link provided for the question OG CR 72 is not showing up.

http://gmatclub.com/forum/in-the-past-the-country-of-malvernia-has-relied-heavily-on-103678.html

Please correct the technical difficulty.

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


Thanks Veritasprep for the explanation. But the argument clearly says the fuel production and the usage trend would continue the same. So there is no gap of demand increasing vs supply deficiency. So how would D be the right choice? Please explain.

Thanks!
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2015, 13:08
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


Ok but i have a doubt.Assuming atleast one system has been converted to natural gas heating system.In the argument it has been mentioned that Malvernia produces more natural gas than the country uses itself.So it indirectly means that if the country has been using 100% oil previously even .0001% decrease in that quantity means there is decline on use through foreign sources.Next part transportation is one of many industries out of which none is clearly mentioned.Even then amount of oil has not increased so it does not validate a decrease in consumption.. like<= types.So again decline is not clearly justified.Thanks in advance.

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In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program
to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. Malvernia currently produces more natural gas each year than
it uses, and oil production in Malvernian oil fields is increasing at a steady pace. If these trends in fuel production
and usage continue, therefore, Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel is likely to decline soon.
Which of the following would it be most useful to establish in evaluating the argument?
(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas?
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil?
(C) What proportion of Malvernia’s total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power?
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation
increasing?
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning
heating systems?
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2015, 21:30
Conclusion: Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel is likely to decline soon.

(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas? - Incorrect. No impact on the conclusion
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil? - Incorrect. No impact on the conclusion
(C) What proportion of Malvernia’s total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power? - Incorrect. Out of scope
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation
increasing? - Correct. If yes, then Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel will not decline. If no, then reliance on foreign sources for fuel will decline.
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning
heating systems? - Incorrect. No impact on the conclusion.

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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Import = Demand – Supply

Import of Natural Gas and Oil = (Demand – Supply)NG + (Demand – Supply)oil

Now, we know that the first parenthesized expression is negative and in the second expression, we are only told about supply of oil, not the demand, so the answer choice must be talking about demand of oil.

We see that option D and option E talk about the demand of oil. So, options A, B and C can be eliminated right away.

While option D directly asks whether oil consumption is increasing or not, option E talks about shifting of consumption from oil to natural gas. Since, we are concerned about import of both oil and natural gas; a shift from oil to natural gas will not impact us. It’ll only change whether we need to import oil or natural gas.

Thus, option D is the correct choice.
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2015, 22:33
Veritas Prep take on the problem

Let’s break down each answer choice:

(A) The question of when production of oil will outstrip production of gas isn’t really relevant. In fact, if you’re using less oil as a result of the change in heating systems, and oil production is up, it’s possible that you can reduce your dependence on foreign oil without having to produce more oil than gas. A is out.

(B) Whether you are among the most dependent countries on foreign oil doesn’t matter. You are now, and we’re trying to determine if you will be in the future. This doesn’t help. Eliminate B.

(C) Hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power aren’t relevant for this argument. We know that you’re dependent on foreign oil now, irrespective of other energy sources. It’s increased oil production and switching to gas that will, according to the argument, reduce this dependence. C is out of scope.

(D) Let’s say your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing. Suddenly, the fact that you’re switching heating systems from oil to gas might not help – if your oil needs are going up in other areas, you may remain dependent on foreign oil. But if your oil consumption in these other areas is not increasing, that would reduce your dependence on foreign oil because your heating systems are switching to gas. D looks good.

(E) This doesn’t matter at all. We know that the systems are going to switch from oil to gas, so the question of whether some systems have already made the switch sheds no light on whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil.

D is the answer. Once you have the answer to whether your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing, you’ll be better able to assess whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil, and, consequently, whether your reign as supreme ruler of Malvernia will continue.
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2016, 08:37
Johnjojop wrote:
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


Thanks Veritasprep for the explanation. But the argument clearly says the fuel production and the usage trend would continue the same. So there is no gap of demand increasing vs supply deficiency. So how would D be the right choice? Please explain.

Thanks!
John.


John,

Here is my take.

1. Country M --> heavily depends on Imported Oil [ IO]
2. IO is used for -> NG production [ It is not known whether complete IO is used to convert NG ]
3. N.G production is more than its usage in country M
4. Oil production in country M is increasing steadily
When the argument says "If these trends in
fuel production and usage continue,"

It means that Oil production increases and NG usage trends continue . It doesn't mean Oil production is more than its usage.
For example, out of 100 units oil production, we use 60 % for NG conversion and rest of the oil for other purposes [ may be in this case transportation and electricity generation usage ]
If there is more usage of Oil for other purposes, then we cann't say IO is less. So we have to evaluate the oil [ produced ] usage trends to establish what is concluded in the argument.

It is little bit of tricky to explain, just pay attention to the GAP of oil production and NG usage.

thanks
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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OG2013 CR Q # 72
OG2017 CR634 P536

In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. Malvernia currently produces more natural gas each year than it uses, and oil production in Malvernian oil fields is increasing at a steady pace. If these trends in fuel production and usage continue, therefore, Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel is likely to decline soon.

Which of the following would it be most useful to establish in evaluating the argument?

(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas?
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil?
(C) What proportion of Malvernia's total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power?
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation increasing?
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning heating systems?


Malvernia
 
Step 1: Identify the Question

In the question stem, the words useful to establish in evaluating indicate that this is an Evaluate the Argument question.

Step 2: Deconstruct the Argument

Past: M lots I oil
Recent: heating oil → gas
Now: make > gas than use
oil prod incr steady
If trends cont → M rely less on foreign fuel

The conclusion is in the form of an if-then statement: If these trends continue, then something else will happen. It’s important to note that the author’s argument is predicated on the idea that the trends will continue. Don’t fall into a trap based on the possibility that the trends will NOT continue; the author hasn’t concluded anything about what might happen if the trends do not continue. The author is only claiming that her conclusion is true if M continues to produce more gas each year than it uses and if oil production keeps increasing at a steady pace.

What does this argument assume? M already has to import oil, but the argument assumes that increasing oil production at a steady pace will allow the country to reduce its oil imports. What if M’s oil consumption is increasing at a much greater pace than its oil production?

Step 3: Pause and State the Goal

On Evaluate questions, the answers will be in the form of a question or a “whether x is true” statement. The correct answer will address an issue on which the argument hinges, depending on whether that statement is true: one way, the argument will be strengthened; the other way, the argument will be weakened.

Step 4: Work from Wrong to Right

(A) The argument does not provide any detail about the relative amounts of oil vs. gas production. Whether M’s oil production outstrips gas production next year or in 20 years, it is still unclear whether the country needs more oil than it produces.
(B) The argument does not compare M to other countries. It is focused solely on whether M will continue to need to import foreign fuel.
(C) If 3% of M’s total needs are currently met by these other energy sources, nothing is changed about the current oil and gas needs as stated in the argument. If 50% of M’s total needs are currently met by these other energy sources, it is still the case that current oil and gas needs are the same as in the argument.
(D) CORRECT. If M needs an increasing amount of oil every year for other uses (electricity and transportation), then it may be the case that M’s oil production is not increasing at a fast enough rate to keep pace with demand. In this case, the argument is weakened. If, on the other hand, M does not need an increasing amount of oil every year for these other needs, then it may be the case that M’s oil production is increasing at a fast enough rate to keep pace with demand, in which case the argument is strengthened.
(E) If none have already been converted, the argument is not impacted because the conclusion is claimed to happen soon; the argument does not say that the conclusion has already occurred. If 1,000 have already been converted, the argument is still not impacted, because the conclusion is still set in the future.
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2017, 08:32
Johnjojop wrote:
VeritasPrepBrandon wrote:
A "most useful to evaluate" question is typically best approached from a weaken mindset. Look to establish the conclusion and premises, decipher the gap in logic, and then think about how you would attack the gap. The correct answer will be focused on one of the gaps in logic.

Here the argument states that while Malvernia relied heavily on imported oil in the past, the company has implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas, and the country is steadily increasing its oil production each year. From these premises the argument concludes that, if these trends continue, Malvernia is likely to experience a reduced dependency on foreign oil in the future. The primary gap in logic here is that this argument is focused on the supply of oil increasing and then one demand of the oil potentially decreasing (heating systems). However, there could be many other oil demands that increase drastically, potentially more than offsetting these factors. Answer D correctly addresses this, because if the amount of oil used for generating electricity and transportation increases greatly, Malvernia may end up depending even more on foreign oil, not less, and thus the conclusion would not hold.

Answer choice A is a pretty irrelevant comparison. Even though Malvernia currently produces more natural gas than it uses, it may just use essentially zero natural gas. Answer choice B is completely out of scope - other countries don't matter. Answer choice C is also out of scope - the argument is not discussing alternative energy sources. And answer choice E is irrelevant. Knowing whether any systems have currently been converted (may 1 has, maybe 1,000,000 have) or not doesn't affect this argument.

I hope this helps!


Thanks Veritasprep for the explanation. But the argument clearly says the fuel production and the usage trend would continue the same. So there is no gap of demand increasing vs supply deficiency. So how would D be the right choice? Please explain.

Thanks!
John.



Hi, to answer your question, the passage says, 'these' treds in fuel production and usage.. it means that the trend of producing oil by this country Malvernia and the usage of natural gas for heating system.

These trends do not refer to anything outside the passage.

Hence we can rightly question option D to evaluate this argument. :)

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In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 18:38
(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas? - What if it does outstrip? It does not mean the natural gas production is reducing. Eliminate.
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil? - So what? The plan is to reduce the usage and we need to find out if this plan will be effective. Eliminate
(C) What proportion of Malvernia's total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power? - Out of scope. There is no mention of renewable energy. Eliminate.
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation increasing? - Yes. If we find that the oil use is increasing, Malverina might have to keep importing oil at current levels even after spending all the effort to convert its heating to gas. Correct.
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning heating systems?- Restating the premise. We already know the a recent program has been implemented. The chances are that some systems are already running on gas. Does not affect the premise.
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2017, 13:33
souvik101990 wrote:
Veritas Prep take on the problem

Let’s break down each answer choice:

(A) The question of when production of oil will outstrip production of gas isn’t really relevant. In fact, if you’re using less oil as a result of the change in heating systems, and oil production is up, it’s possible that you can reduce your dependence on foreign oil without having to produce more oil than gas. A is out.

(B) Whether you are among the most dependent countries on foreign oil doesn’t matter. You are now, and we’re trying to determine if you will be in the future. This doesn’t help. Eliminate B.

(C) Hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power aren’t relevant for this argument. We know that you’re dependent on foreign oil now, irrespective of other energy sources. It’s increased oil production and switching to gas that will, according to the argument, reduce this dependence. C is out of scope.

(D) Let’s say your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing. Suddenly, the fact that you’re switching heating systems from oil to gas might not help – if your oil needs are going up in other areas, you may remain dependent on foreign oil. But if your oil consumption in these other areas is not increasing, that would reduce your dependence on foreign oil because your heating systems are switching to gas. D looks good.

(E) This doesn’t matter at all. We know that the systems are going to switch from oil to gas, so the question of whether some systems have already made the switch sheds no light on whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil.

D is the answer. Once you have the answer to whether your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing, you’ll be better able to assess whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil, and, consequently, whether your reign as supreme ruler of Malvernia will continue.





Hello
why option E is wrong, the argument says " Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. " so we can say if the heating system uses natural gas instead of oil, there is no need to import fuel ( which is oil as it mentions in the passage).

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2017, 13:36
gmat2015p wrote:
OG2013 CR Q # 72
OG2017 CR634 P536

In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. Malvernia currently produces more natural gas each year than it uses, and oil production in Malvernian oil fields is increasing at a steady pace. If these trends in fuel production and usage continue, therefore, Malvernian reliance on foreign sources for fuel is likely to decline soon.

Which of the following would it be most useful to establish in evaluating the argument?

(A) When, if ever, will production of oil in Malvernia outstrip production of natural gas?
(B) Is Malvernia among the countries that rely most on imported oil?
(C) What proportion of Malvernia's total energy needs is met by hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power?
(D) Is the amount of oil used each year in Malvernia for generating electricity and fuel for transportation increasing?
(E) Have any existing oil-burning heating systems in Malvernia already been converted to natural-gas-burning heating systems?


As per me D is the correct answer.
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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2017, 13:43
soodia wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
Veritas Prep take on the problem

Let’s break down each answer choice:

(A) The question of when production of oil will outstrip production of gas isn’t really relevant. In fact, if you’re using less oil as a result of the change in heating systems, and oil production is up, it’s possible that you can reduce your dependence on foreign oil without having to produce more oil than gas. A is out.

(B) Whether you are among the most dependent countries on foreign oil doesn’t matter. You are now, and we’re trying to determine if you will be in the future. This doesn’t help. Eliminate B.

(C) Hydroelectric, solar, and nuclear power aren’t relevant for this argument. We know that you’re dependent on foreign oil now, irrespective of other energy sources. It’s increased oil production and switching to gas that will, according to the argument, reduce this dependence. C is out of scope.

(D) Let’s say your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing. Suddenly, the fact that you’re switching heating systems from oil to gas might not help – if your oil needs are going up in other areas, you may remain dependent on foreign oil. But if your oil consumption in these other areas is not increasing, that would reduce your dependence on foreign oil because your heating systems are switching to gas. D looks good.

(E) This doesn’t matter at all. We know that the systems are going to switch from oil to gas, so the question of whether some systems have already made the switch sheds no light on whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil.

D is the answer. Once you have the answer to whether your oil consumption for electricity and transportation is increasing, you’ll be better able to assess whether you will remain dependent on foreign oil, and, consequently, whether your reign as supreme ruler of Malvernia will continue.





Hello
why option E is wrong, the argument says " Malvernia has relied heavily on imported oil. Malvernia recently implemented a program to convert heating systems from oil to natural gas. " so we can say if the heating system uses natural gas instead of oil, there is no need to import fuel ( which is oil as it mentions in the passage).

Hi Soodia,


The right approach to tackling GMAT CRs is to stick on to the stuffs passage mentions. Passage deals with current oil imports. What others is doing dsnt impact our argument as passage dsnt talk of it.

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Re: In the past the country of Malvernia has relied heavily on imported   [#permalink] 19 Sep 2017, 13:43
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