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Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!!

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Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2015, 02:11
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Hello!

So I'm applying for the September 2016 intake and would love to engage with fellow applicants here.

Best,

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2015, 02:22

Live Q&A Session with INSEAD Current Students


Dear INSEAD Applicants,

We are excited to announce that few INSEAD current students recently contacted us and expressed their interest in doing a live chat session for GMATClub members interested in INSEAD. So, we are having this chat on the upcoming Monday. Three Students from INSEAD will be participating in the chat. This is your opportunity to learn from their experiences and get insights of INSEAD's MBA program. You are free to ask them whatever questions you have in mind about INSEAD's application process.
Event details are given below. So save the date and be ready with your questions.


Date: June 22, 2015. Monday

Add This Event to your Google Calender




Students Participating in the Chat:



Abhishek Sahay – INSEAD 15 D - Prior experience in strategy consulting at McKinsey & Company in India; Worked for 1 year in social sector in Ethiopia as part of Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; brief part-time effort as an admissions consultant to support applicants to MBA programs. Bachelors in Mathematics from Delhi University.








Monica Cepak –INSEAD 15 J – Prior experience in PR and global marketing for Samsung, LinkedIn and HP as well as consultancy services for start-ups in New York City. Bachelor of Arts from Princeton University and Master’s Degrees from University of Rotterdam and University of Barcelona; Published Author.









Akkshay Chugh – INSEAD 15J - Prior experience in Investment Banking at Jefferies in the US and Ernst & Young in India. Co-founded Aura Investment Partners in the US & India. Graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science from the University of Pennsylvania.







Place: GMATClub Chat Room

Timing of the Session: 9.00 AM Pacific Time on June 22nd, 2015.

Add This Event to your Google Calender


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Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2015, 04:02
Thank you everyone who participated in recent chat INSEAD current students: Abhishek Sahay and Akkshay Chugh. I am posting here select questions and their answers by INSEAD students. You can download full chat transcript from the end of this post.

MBADREAM: What according to you is fit for insead ...as in what qualities is insead looking for besides the obvious leadership experience
INSEAD_Abhishek: Good question. I would say a few things: international exposure and/or future outlook, relatively high work experience and I'd say more maturity. Of course, this is in addition to the standard leadership +good GMAT.

Ergenekon: I would like to know your opinion on how easy or difficult it is to find a job in the USA after Insead? What opportunities Insead offers for graduates who want to work in the USA. I heard that Insead has partnership with Wharton. Do you know how effective is this partnership?
INSEAD_Abhishek: Honestly, INSEAD is not the ideal school if you're non-American and want to settle in the US. And yes, there is a pretty good partnership between INSEAD and Wharton.
You can access Wharton jobs through the exchange.

Ergenekon: Could you elaborate a little more why insead is not an ideal place for international students who want to work in the USA?
INSEAD_Akkshay: (1) Competition from Top US Schools is fierce. (2) It really depends if you have already worked in the US or have studied there or have any networks there. (3) If you have absolutely no connection to the US before joining INSEAD I would not recommend pining your hopes on a job in the US since you will be competing with other US applicants from INSEAD as well as US applicants from the Top US B-Schools.

Abhinay: I would like to switch industry to Consulting after my MBA. How important do you think is the internship opportunity that I'll get in the Jan intake if one wants to switch industries? Have people easily switched to consulting?
INSEAD_Akkshay: Consulting is a very common track here at INSEAD and switching is not a problem at all, we have teachers, doctors, investment bankers who are joining McKinsey, Bain, BCG. However if YOU are not sure about doing consulting then I would recommend a summer internship, otherwise it’s not a problem at all.

mib_8t7pho: Does INSEAD consider students without International Work Experience ? I am in social sector from past 2 years and with startups another 2 years but no international exposure...
INSEAD_Abhishek: Yes, INSEAD does accept but it's strongly recommended to have some sort of international experience and at a min, a global outlook for your future career

mib_60tqba: Does INSEAD MBA suit for the development field with networks and leadership roles? I am from South East Asia and want to make changes in my country.
INSEAD_Abhishek: I'm assuming you mean social sector. We do have a fairly good record of students going in this field.... and the club INDEVOR is quite active with many networking opportunities.

nehaagarwal02: Quick question on the pro's - con's of a 1 year MBA vs a 2 year one. Many claim that one year is way too cramped and there is no internship opportunity. Is this a drawback?
INSEAD_Akkshay: Neha you can still do an internship if you join the Jan-December batch at INSEAD, that’s what Abhishek is doing and he will be starting his internship in 10 days, I on the other hand, will be finishing my course in 10 months flat, personally I prefer 1 year since you don't take off too much time from work, it’s cheaper. I can also assure you that it’s probably the most amazing year of your life given that its a 1 year program.

mib_bemztr: What's was your best class at INSEAD?
INSEAD_Akkshay: Mine was Negotiations - every single class we actually negotiated and it ranged from simple 1-1 to 3-3 to complex 5-1 negotiations

Bikerdude: How's it living in France? From a personal perspective?
INSEAD_Akkshay: I live in the French country side, in the outhouse of an actual Chateau it sounds exactly like it is , its an amazing experience, don't get me wrong I'm a big city guy but have been here for 10 months and have really enjoyed it. You can be assured that if you join INSEAD whether in Singapore or Fonty, you WILL BE traveling every single weekend, you might just have to miss out on sleep. That’s all

takeTWO: Can you be honest about the career service at Insead? I have generally heard its one of the best. Is it really true?
INSEAD_Abhishek: Yes, the career services are quite good here, but you must be proactive in reaching out to them. They have sector specific advisors who are quite knowledgeable

marine: Does everybody willing to switch to strategy consulting manage doing so? Or did you see a decent number of students having to go to another industry than wanted?
INSEAD_Akkshay: You have tons of consulting firms but all might not get job offers, that really depends on how they do in the interviews, some do end up taking industry, some realize through the process that consulting is not really for them given the travel and lifestyle, but there certainly isn't lack of opportunities for consulting, INSEAD is #1 for consulting


Bikerdude: I read earlier that most students end up getting placed in UK/Singapore. Are there any other countries/regions where INSEAD students typically find themselves working after their MBA?
INSEAD_Akkshay: London SG is the place most people want to be after INSEAD, given that language is not an issue, within Europe you have several in Luxembourg, Zurich.
I forgot DUBAI - A LOT of students end up there - no tax !

Chat Transcript
Attachment:
INSEAD Current Student Chat 22nd June 15.pdf [792.96 KiB]
Downloaded 147 times
To download please login or register as a user


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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2015, 05:58
Hello INSEADites,

I am glad that someone has started this thread since insead is my dream B school.
I really want to make it to there.
Can we put up all the queries here regarding the profile n admissions?

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 00:10
Hello Inseadites ,
I want to venture into entrepreneurship post INSEAD, can you tell me how good INSEAD is when it comes to startups being formed out of the school?

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My Trip to Uganda [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2015, 21:00
FROM Insead Admissions Blog: My Trip to Uganda
I spent six weeks of summer 2015 in Uganda, right on the equator. Sweet deal! I got to spend my summer break hanging out in the back of a pick-up truck, meandering in the Rwenzori Mountains on the DRC border. I was driven around to interview coffee farmers as part of a corporate subsidy program to develop the coffee farming community.

A few days after my arrival, I learnt of my new identity. I was mzungu. Not “Sir”, not “Mister”, not “Excuse me” nor “yes please?”

“Mzungu!” Which means “white man” in Swahili. It’s not a derogatory term around here. It’s just giving back the true vocabulary to words that political correctness stole away, the correctness that plagues Western society. White man indeed! I won’t deny that.

Unmistakably, every time we arrived in a new village, people were attracted by our nice Nissan 4×4. When the mzungu came out of the car, this was when the full house event began. The best of events was usually when there was a school nearby and kids were either on recess or finishing classes. All of us were in for a real treat! We had between 100 and 200 kids circling in, just staring at us—me. Once in a while, I’d look back at them, and they’d start giggling, hiding behind their friends the same way I would if I were a teen getting to meet Slash or Keith Richards. And if ever I smiled or winked at them, they’d run back to their friends and start chatting excitedly covering their mouths behind their hands, maybe unaware I don’t understand a word they were saying.

Image

As we left the village, there was the ‘encore’ or curtain call. All the kids started running after us, and they finally got their voice back, yelling, “How are you?!” “Mzungu!” “Bye bye!” They were absolutely thrilled to give me a high five through the car window. Whoa! Maybe that is how Rocky felt when he was running with the 200 kids in the streets of Philadelphia, right before climbing up the Rocky steps. At one point, an elderly woman actually told my colleague, “Thanks for bringing a mzungu with you.”

The insightful part began when I started talking with my Ugandan colleague. He actually told me that the population would get really excited when they get to see a mzungu in person. I understand that many kids might have never even seen one before and they may end up totally beside themselves with joy and excitement. The locals, on the other hand, are excited more because of what we represent to them. They just seem really happy to see, talk, meet and shake hands with a mzungu.

My colleague then continues, ”You know, because of our colonial past, we are used to perceiving the mzungu as being able to lift the community welfare, and we look up to them. We usually see the mzungu coming around in nice cars. In a country where we might have 10 to 15% of the population that can afford a car, this is definitely not trivial.”

All kidding aside, it is not without a certain level of discomfort that I analyze and absorb the situation. I really wish those kids looked up to me for an objectively better reason than because I was born in a mzungu’s body, from mzungu parents. Indeed, if you’re reading this, you may have picked up on the fact that I was born in a fortunate situation, where I have never lacked anything, neither material nor immaterial. I am not prone to being a target of racism, sexism, discrimination because of sexual orientation or religious beliefs, not even for economic or political beliefs. Smooth sailing. Smooth sailing.

I would feel a lot more comfortable, and I might even enjoy the high fiving and ego trip a little bit had I negotiated a treaty ensuring long lasting peace in the Middle East. Or found the cure to world hunger. But still, my colleague carried on, “You inspire these kids. They look up to you, and the mobility you have is a source of motivation for them—for us.”

Then I put my thinking cap on. I haven’t really discussed the following with other people yet. You reading it is sort of a prime time, if you wish.

The reason why the locals look up to the mzungu is probably for all the wrong reasons, such as the colonial past or the fact that white people generally living in “rich countries”. But let’s be constructive. In a broader context, let’s agree it probably doesn’t matter why or how one inspires people, or even how people end up looking up to someone. The bottom line is that you end up having certain influence over a group of people. In my case, this temporary influence I have is over the local kids that have the huge advantage—or vulnerability—of being moldable and easily influenced. In the end, all that matters is what I do with this. Of course, I might eventually feel better if I discover the cure to HIV. But it doesn’t matter how I feel. When in a position of influence, it shouldn’t be about me. It’s about the people over whom I have influence. They are the ones that matter. How about making something good out of this influence?

I really look forward to discussing this. But until then, next time someone looks up to you, try and do something positive out of it, and don’t fret too much about the why. You might have more influence than you think, and this may lead you to having the power to change the world for the better. One step, one kid, or one opportunity at a time.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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My Trip to Uganda [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2015, 21:01
FROM Insead Admissions Blog1: My Trip to Uganda
I spent six weeks of summer 2015 in Uganda, right on the equator. Sweet deal! I got to spend my summer break hanging out in the back of a pick-up truck, meandering in the Rwenzori Mountains on the DRC border. I was driven around to interview coffee farmers as part of a corporate subsidy program to develop the coffee farming community.

A few days after my arrival, I learnt of my new identity. I was mzungu. Not “Sir”, not “Mister”, not “Excuse me” nor “yes please?”

“Mzungu!” Which means “white man” in Swahili. It’s not a derogatory term around here. It’s just giving back the true vocabulary to words that political correctness stole away, the correctness that plagues Western society. White man indeed! I won’t deny that.

Unmistakably, every time we arrived in a new village, people were attracted by our nice Nissan 4×4. When the mzungu came out of the car, this was when the full house event began. The best of events was usually when there was a school nearby and kids were either on recess or finishing classes. All of us were in for a real treat! We had between 100 and 200 kids circling in, just staring at us—me. Once in a while, I’d look back at them, and they’d start giggling, hiding behind their friends the same way I would if I were a teen getting to meet Slash or Keith Richards. And if ever I smiled or winked at them, they’d run back to their friends and start chatting excitedly covering their mouths behind their hands, maybe unaware I don’t understand a word they were saying.

Image

As we left the village, there was the ‘encore’ or curtain call. All the kids started running after us, and they finally got their voice back, yelling, “How are you?!” “Mzungu!” “Bye bye!” They were absolutely thrilled to give me a high five through the car window. Whoa! Maybe that is how Rocky felt when he was running with the 200 kids in the streets of Philadelphia, right before climbing up the Rocky steps. At one point, an elderly woman actually told my colleague, “Thanks for bringing a mzungu with you.”

The insightful part began when I started talking with my Ugandan colleague. He actually told me that the population would get really excited when they get to see a mzungu in person. I understand that many kids might have never even seen one before and they may end up totally beside themselves with joy and excitement. The locals, on the other hand, are excited more because of what we represent to them. They just seem really happy to see, talk, meet and shake hands with a mzungu.

My colleague then continues, ”You know, because of our colonial past, we are used to perceiving the mzungu as being able to lift the community welfare, and we look up to them. We usually see the mzungu coming around in nice cars. In a country where we might have 10 to 15% of the population that can afford a car, this is definitely not trivial.”

All kidding aside, it is not without a certain level of discomfort that I analyze and absorb the situation. I really wish those kids looked up to me for an objectively better reason than because I was born in a mzungu’s body, from mzungu parents. Indeed, if you’re reading this, you may have picked up on the fact that I was born in a fortunate situation, where I have never lacked anything, neither material nor immaterial. I am not prone to being a target of racism, sexism, discrimination because of sexual orientation or religious beliefs, not even for economic or political beliefs. Smooth sailing. Smooth sailing.

I would feel a lot more comfortable, and I might even enjoy the high fiving and ego trip a little bit had I negotiated a treaty ensuring long lasting peace in the Middle East. Or found the cure to world hunger. But still, my colleague carried on, “You inspire these kids. They look up to you, and the mobility you have is a source of motivation for them—for us.”

Then I put my thinking cap on. I haven’t really discussed the following with other people yet. You reading it is sort of a prime time, if you wish.

The reason why the locals look up to the mzungu is probably for all the wrong reasons, such as the colonial past or the fact that white people generally living in “rich countries”. But let’s be constructive. In a broader context, let’s agree it probably doesn’t matter why or how one inspires people, or even how people end up looking up to someone. The bottom line is that you end up having certain influence over a group of people. In my case, this temporary influence I have is over the local kids that have the huge advantage—or vulnerability—of being moldable and easily influenced. In the end, all that matters is what I do with this. Of course, I might eventually feel better if I discover the cure to HIV. But it doesn’t matter how I feel. When in a position of influence, it shouldn’t be about me. It’s about the people over whom I have influence. They are the ones that matter. How about making something good out of this influence?

I really look forward to discussing this. But until then, next time someone looks up to you, try and do something positive out of it, and don’t fret too much about the why. You might have more influence than you think, and this may lead you to having the power to change the world for the better. One step, one kid, or one opportunity at a time.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Kudos [?]: 23 [0], given: 0

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All of what will happen has happened before [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2015, 01:00
FROM Insead Admissions Blog: All of what will happen has happened before
Orientation officially begins this Sunday but predictably, the pace for my classmates and I is already frantic. We are slowly trickling into town and getting our phones (first priority, obviously), our apartments, and our visas sorted. Some of us are living it up in Bali or in the South of France. Some are toiling away at Business Foundations courses, and getting to experience the joy that is group work. Some of us are trying to study for exemption exams and exit language tests (key word: trying). Some are kissing babies and partners extra hard before life officially gets crazy. And all of us are going to the thousands of drinks and lunches and dinners happening every day. So unofficially, b-school is definitely in full swing.

What I find comforting is to remember that we’re having a very universal experience—kind of how having a kid is the “same” for everyone, but it still is life changing for YOU.

Image

The cafe at the Singy campus – probably the emptiest it will be all year

Specifically, even though INSEAD is a 10-month program for us September starters, I still feel the presence of everyone before me. You can hear it in the discussions we’re already having. Everyone knows what FOMO is (“fear of missing out”). Everyone knows 90% of the class secretly wants to be on the Dean’s List in P1 but that drops to 15% by P3. Everyone knows there’s a lot of weekend trips. Everyone knows group work is going to be the bane of our existence. Everyone knows there’s some sort of a bidding system we have to use to choose electives and campus exchanges. Everyone knows way more of us will get seduced into applying for consulting roles than originally planned. everyone knows it’s going to be crazy and fun.

How? Some of it is from talking to alumni and other batches before us in person or in the lovely Facebook groups. Some of it has been institutionalized forever in the official and unofficial INSEAD blogs floating around the Internet (hours of entertainment) where you can read all about the joys and the angst of going to b-school. I kind of love all the previous batches already because of the road map they’ve created for the next 10 months.

Why is this important?

1) Hearing INSEAD students in their own voice gives YOU an idea of whether this school and this program is the right fit and whether you can see yourself here.

2) The road map can help us start strong—to hopefully be clearer about what we’re going to prioritize during the program (among others, recruiting, family, socializing, joining clubs, networking, traveling, parties, dating, exercising, sleeping, getting on the Dean’s list—something will have to give). I’ve amused my husband to no end by experiencing FOMO before even starting, but I think it’s a useful exercise. Kind of like an anti-gravity chamber!

3) So we know we’re not alone in what we go through—the good and the bad, the successes and the setbacks, the exhaustion and the exhilaration; this has happened before and this too, shall pass. So let’s savor it.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

Kudos [?]: 23 [0], given: 0

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All of what will happen has happened before [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2015, 01:01
FROM Insead Admissions Blog1: All of what will happen has happened before
Orientation officially begins this Sunday but predictably, the pace for my classmates and I is already frantic. We are slowly trickling into town and getting our phones (first priority, obviously), our apartments, and our visas sorted. Some of us are living it up in Bali or in the South of France. Some are toiling away at Business Foundations courses, and getting to experience the joy that is group work. Some of us are trying to study for exemption exams and exit language tests (key word: trying). Some are kissing babies and partners extra hard before life officially gets crazy. And all of us are going to the thousands of drinks and lunches and dinners happening every day. So unofficially, b-school is definitely in full swing.

What I find comforting is to remember that we’re having a very universal experience—kind of how having a kid is the “same” for everyone, but it still is life changing for YOU.

Image

The cafe at the Singy campus – probably the emptiest it will be all year

Specifically, even though INSEAD is a 10-month program for us September starters, I still feel the presence of everyone before me. You can hear it in the discussions we’re already having. Everyone knows what FOMO is (“fear of missing out”). Everyone knows 90% of the class secretly wants to be on the Dean’s List in P1 but that drops to 15% by P3. Everyone knows there’s a lot of weekend trips. Everyone knows group work is going to be the bane of our existence. Everyone knows there’s some sort of a bidding system we have to use to choose electives and campus exchanges. Everyone knows way more of us will get seduced into applying for consulting roles than originally planned. everyone knows it’s going to be crazy and fun.

How? Some of it is from talking to alumni and other batches before us in person or in the lovely Facebook groups. Some of it has been institutionalized forever in the official and unofficial INSEAD blogs floating around the Internet (hours of entertainment) where you can read all about the joys and the angst of going to b-school. I kind of love all the previous batches already because of the road map they’ve created for the next 10 months.

Why is this important?

1) Hearing INSEAD students in their own voice gives YOU an idea of whether this school and this program is the right fit and whether you can see yourself here.

2) The road map can help us start strong—to hopefully be clearer about what we’re going to prioritize during the program (among others, recruiting, family, socializing, joining clubs, networking, traveling, parties, dating, exercising, sleeping, getting on the Dean’s list—something will have to give). I’ve amused my husband to no end by experiencing FOMO before even starting, but I think it’s a useful exercise. Kind of like an anti-gravity chamber!

3) So we know we’re not alone in what we go through—the good and the bad, the successes and the setbacks, the exhaustion and the exhilaration; this has happened before and this too, shall pass. So let’s savor it.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2015, 16:13
Seeing that the deadline for R1 is less than a month away, it's surprising to see this thread so quiet. But with 1600+ views, I think it's worth sharing my experience.

I'm already admitted to Sept 2016 intake, although I applied back in October 2014 for R2 Sept 2015 intake. Admission thought that I need to get an extra year of work experience before starting the program. So keep in mind that this may happen to you, although to my knowledge not a lot of people get this.

Male, 26, Indonesian
GMAT 670
Engineer in large CPG company in US. 4 years experience this year, 5 by the time I matriculate

Wishing everyone a good application season!

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2015, 16:45
Hello Class of 2017 hopefuls.

I was an applicant to INSEAD last season and got accepted in R1. I also got offers from MIT Sloan and waitlisted at Wharton. I wrote about the whole experience on my blog (http://topdogmba.com) and would like to invite you over to check out some of the material on there - hopefully there's something that will be useful and help you craft a winning application this year.

In particular, I wrote about some of the key credentials of INSEAD (http://topdogmba.com/2014/07/11/think-for-yourself-insead/ and http://topdogmba.com/2014/08/02/think-for-yourself-insead-part-2/) and my own interview experiences (http://topdogmba.com/2014/11/26/what-goes-on-insead-interview-report-1/ and http://topdogmba.com/2014/11/26/what-goes-on-insead-interview-report-2/).

I'm now in MIT Sloan's Class of 2017 and would be happy to hear from anyone working on their applications.

Just wanted to reach out and offer some free advice. Look forward to seeing you.
_________________

TopDogMBA - A Reapplicant's Tail - http://topdogmba.com/

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Why INSEAD: An American Going Global [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2015, 23:00
FROM Insead Admissions Blog: Why INSEAD: An American Going Global
Image

Hello! My name is Rachel Bush. I am an American having worked in healthcare business development and strategy in the US, South America, and Middle East and am joining the ‘16J class at INSEAD this fall.  Having recently arrived on campus in Singapore, I am beyond excited for the term to start, to meet all my fellow classmates, and to learn from each other’s vastly diverse professional and personal experiences.  While INSEAD is a top-ranked MBA programme recognized throughout the world, I’ve had many colleagues, friends and family ask me why I chose to pursue my MBA at INSEAD instead of attending school in the U.S.  Well, let me tell you:

1. Global Diversity

My primary motivation to attend business school outside of the U.S. was to be surrounded by others that came from not only varying professional backgrounds, but also diverse cultural and national backgrounds.  As someone who plans to continue a professional career on an international scale, it is important for me to understand not only how business works in other parts of the world, but to understand the perspectives of other cultures and to be able to connect with people from differing backgrounds no matter where they are from.  Being part of a cohort that is made up of 90+ nationalities, with no one country being a majority, will expand my perspective and way of thinking in a way I never imagined.  Also to be able to share my own experiences and perspectives on the world with my classmates and broaden their perspectives as well.

2. Pursuing an International Career

While this clearly ties into point #1 above, ultimately my goal is to continue my professional career working in an international environment.  As technological advances continue to accelerate and societies continue to develop, the world is quickly shrinking and the ability to have an impact beyond local, regional, and national borders becomes more feasible.  The ability for me to collaborate, manage, and effectively communicate with people from any corner of the world will be absolutely critical if I want to continue expanding and developing services and/or products around the globe.  And while yes, I could have gone to a top US school and still managed to work abroad, I believe that for me, being surrounded by and immersed in a globally diverse network (both my peers as well as my professors) will better prepare me for an international career.  Lastly, with recruiting connections all over the world, but especially in Europe and Asia, INSEAD can provide me the launching pad to more easily transplant to a new geography if I so choose after graduation.

3. Experience of Living Abroad

I believe every person should experience travelling and/or living abroad at some point in their life.  Not only to broaden your perspective on the world, but also to explore and see how much more of the world there is beyond your own home country.  INSEAD offers the opportunity to live for at least 4-5 months in not only one, but two very different countries with their main campuses located in France and Singapore.  With the newly formed Abu Dhabi program as well as additional campus exchanges, one could experience even more if they wanted.  Not only will I be living in both Singapore and France and experiencing the local cultures of those two nations, but I will also have access to other neighboring countries throughout Southeast Asia and Europe.  For someone coming from a country where it takes six hours to fly in an airplane from one side to the other, being able to hop over to Thailand or Germany for a weekend trip is a dream come true.

4. Alumni Network

I’m not certain how many programs can say they have alumni connections located in as many cities and countries as INSEAD, but my guess is not many.  Before the school term started, I had the opportunity to take time off of work and travel throughout North and South America in the United States, Canada, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil.  Everywhere I went, there were other INSEAD students – and these were just students from my same class.  Imagine the vast amount of connections, both current students and alum, throughout not just North and South America, but also Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.  I know that no matter where I am in the world, there will be an INSEAD connection, which is pretty amazing.

 

All in all, I am incredibly grateful and excited to become part of such an amazing network and can’t wait for what will surely be a challenging, yet incredible and possibly one of the most interesting and amazing years of my life!

 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Why INSEAD: An American Going Global [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2015, 23:01
FROM Insead Admissions Blog1: Why INSEAD: An American Going Global
Image

Hello! My name is Rachel Bush. I am an American having worked in healthcare business development and strategy in the US, South America, and Middle East and am joining the ‘16J class at INSEAD this fall.  Having recently arrived on campus in Singapore, I am beyond excited for the term to start, to meet all my fellow classmates, and to learn from each other’s vastly diverse professional and personal experiences.  While INSEAD is a top-ranked MBA programme recognized throughout the world, I’ve had many colleagues, friends and family ask me why I chose to pursue my MBA at INSEAD instead of attending school in the U.S.  Well, let me tell you:

1. Global Diversity

My primary motivation to attend business school outside of the U.S. was to be surrounded by others that came from not only varying professional backgrounds, but also diverse cultural and national backgrounds.  As someone who plans to continue a professional career on an international scale, it is important for me to understand not only how business works in other parts of the world, but to understand the perspectives of other cultures and to be able to connect with people from differing backgrounds no matter where they are from.  Being part of a cohort that is made up of 90+ nationalities, with no one country being a majority, will expand my perspective and way of thinking in a way I never imagined.  Also to be able to share my own experiences and perspectives on the world with my classmates and broaden their perspectives as well.

2. Pursuing an International Career

While this clearly ties into point #1 above, ultimately my goal is to continue my professional career working in an international environment.  As technological advances continue to accelerate and societies continue to develop, the world is quickly shrinking and the ability to have an impact beyond local, regional, and national borders becomes more feasible.  The ability for me to collaborate, manage, and effectively communicate with people from any corner of the world will be absolutely critical if I want to continue expanding and developing services and/or products around the globe.  And while yes, I could have gone to a top US school and still managed to work abroad, I believe that for me, being surrounded by and immersed in a globally diverse network (both my peers as well as my professors) will better prepare me for an international career.  Lastly, with recruiting connections all over the world, but especially in Europe and Asia, INSEAD can provide me the launching pad to more easily transplant to a new geography if I so choose after graduation.

3. Experience of Living Abroad

I believe every person should experience travelling and/or living abroad at some point in their life.  Not only to broaden your perspective on the world, but also to explore and see how much more of the world there is beyond your own home country.  INSEAD offers the opportunity to live for at least 4-5 months in not only one, but two very different countries with their main campuses located in France and Singapore.  With the newly formed Abu Dhabi program as well as additional campus exchanges, one could experience even more if they wanted.  Not only will I be living in both Singapore and France and experiencing the local cultures of those two nations, but I will also have access to other neighboring countries throughout Southeast Asia and Europe.  For someone coming from a country where it takes six hours to fly in an airplane from one side to the other, being able to hop over to Thailand or Germany for a weekend trip is a dream come true.

4. Alumni Network

I’m not certain how many programs can say they have alumni connections located in as many cities and countries as INSEAD, but my guess is not many.  Before the school term started, I had the opportunity to take time off of work and travel throughout North and South America in the United States, Canada, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil.  Everywhere I went, there were other INSEAD students – and these were just students from my same class.  Imagine the vast amount of connections, both current students and alum, throughout not just North and South America, but also Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.  I know that no matter where I am in the world, there will be an INSEAD connection, which is pretty amazing.

 

All in all, I am incredibly grateful and excited to become part of such an amazing network and can’t wait for what will surely be a challenging, yet incredible and possibly one of the most interesting and amazing years of my life!

 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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The Personal Touch [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 19:01
FROM Insead Admissions Blog1: The Personal Touch
There are lots of things that go into the decision of where you want to go for your MBA. You are likely to look into job prospects, geography, faculty, diversity of candidates, tuition cost, opportunity cost, loans and scholarships, strengths of program, reputation in market, famous alumni and a host of other extremely logical reasons of why you should or should not choose a particular school. While all these are extremely important, I decided to go to INSEAD the moment I knew I was in. Not necessarily because it was a clear winner in all the above mentioned criteria but because they did one simple thing—they called me to tell me that I got in.

Image

I was on a bus in New York heading to work when someone from INSEAD administration, whose name I instantly forgot in excitement, called me. She introduced herself and congratulated me on getting into INSEAD. She informed me that I would be starting on the Fontainebleau campus and that she was excited to meet me on campus. While this is fairly vain, this extra bit of personal attention on that call that lasted about a minute was all it really took – a personal touch.

When you start doing MBA applications, you realize all schools basically ask you the same things. Why MBA? Why this school? What can you bring to the table? However, INSEAD’s essay questions were a little different. To me they felt like a career counsellor was walking me through different portions of a personality test, trying to get to know me better as a person and not just my professional background. INSEAD wants to know the personal anecdotes that make you who you are.

All questions in the INSEAD application ask you to reflect in a way most other applications don’t. For example, essay #1 while asking you to summarize your career also asks you to consider the opportunity cost of going for the MBA.

“Briefly summarize your current (or most recent) job. [...] What would be your next step in terms of position if you were to remain in the same company?”

You are forced to consider exactly what you are giving up. Are you really willing to give up a promotion in a year’s time to start at the bottom rung of the ladder in a different industry? Are you sure you want to leave a secure life and relocate? Are you sure you are willing to take this risk? “What are the main factors that have affected your personal development, provide examples?” “How did these experiences impact your relationships with others?” “How are you enriched by extracurricular activities” INSEAD doesn’t just want to know what you did, but wants to know the “So What?” How did this effect you? How did this change you?

Another essay asks the candidate for a description of their professional history and goals “as if you were talking to someone at a social gathering detailing your career path with the rationale behind your choices.” The important thing here is that the tone should be true to yourself, as you would describe your professional journey to a friend and not necessarily to an admissions committee.

The one essay I truly loved and thought set INSEAD apart was the one on cultural diversity.

“Tell us about an experience where you were significantly impacted by cultural diversity, in a positive or negative way.”

This is a question that truly signifies the importance of diversity at INSEAD and the intimacy the admissions team is looking for. The answer to this question doesn’t have to be a work-related one and definitely cannot be one with shallow cultural involvement such as “I was a tourist in Thailand for a week.” You need not have travelled the globe for you to be aware of the different cultures around you, especially in a globally connected world. I myself talked about the different cultures growing in India as one part of the population modernizes swiftly while another holds on to more traditional values and how this dichotomy affects me as someone who is a part of both worlds. All of us have been touched by cultural diversity on some level and this question asks you to share a very intimate, personal experience with the admissions team.

We’ve all heard this piece of advice when starting MBA applications – be yourself, don’t project yourself as the admissions committee wants to see you. Yet, we often try to find out what are the key characteristics a school is known for and tailor our essays accordingly. For INSEAD, I can truly say, relax and be yourself. The committee wants to know you personally because that is the way things are done at INSEAD.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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The Personal Touch [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 20:00
FROM Insead Admissions Blog: The Personal Touch
There are lots of things that go into the decision of where you want to go for your MBA. You are likely to look into job prospects, geography, faculty, diversity of candidates, tuition cost, opportunity cost, loans and scholarships, strengths of program, reputation in market, famous alumni and a host of other extremely logical reasons of why you should or should not choose a particular school. While all these are extremely important, I decided to go to INSEAD the moment I knew I was in. Not necessarily because it was a clear winner in all the above mentioned criteria but because they did one simple thing—they called me to tell me that I got in.

Image

I was on a bus in New York heading to work when someone from INSEAD administration, whose name I instantly forgot in excitement, called me. She introduced herself and congratulated me on getting into INSEAD. She informed me that I would be starting on the Fontainebleau campus and that she was excited to meet me on campus. While this is fairly vain, this extra bit of personal attention on that call that lasted about a minute was all it really took – a personal touch.

When you start doing MBA applications, you realize all schools basically ask you the same things. Why MBA? Why this school? What can you bring to the table? However, INSEAD’s essay questions were a little different. To me they felt like a career counsellor was walking me through different portions of a personality test, trying to get to know me better as a person and not just my professional background. INSEAD wants to know the personal anecdotes that make you who you are.

All questions in the INSEAD application ask you to reflect in a way most other applications don’t. For example, essay #1 while asking you to summarize your career also asks you to consider the opportunity cost of going for the MBA.

“Briefly summarize your current (or most recent) job. [...] What would be your next step in terms of position if you were to remain in the same company?”

You are forced to consider exactly what you are giving up. Are you really willing to give up a promotion in a year’s time to start at the bottom rung of the ladder in a different industry? Are you sure you want to leave a secure life and relocate? Are you sure you are willing to take this risk? “What are the main factors that have affected your personal development, provide examples?” “How did these experiences impact your relationships with others?” “How are you enriched by extracurricular activities” INSEAD doesn’t just want to know what you did, but wants to know the “So What?” How did this effect you? How did this change you?

Another essay asks the candidate for a description of their professional history and goals “as if you were talking to someone at a social gathering detailing your career path with the rationale behind your choices.” The important thing here is that the tone should be true to yourself, as you would describe your professional journey to a friend and not necessarily to an admissions committee.

The one essay I truly loved and thought set INSEAD apart was the one on cultural diversity.

“Tell us about an experience where you were significantly impacted by cultural diversity, in a positive or negative way.”

This is a question that truly signifies the importance of diversity at INSEAD and the intimacy the admissions team is looking for. The answer to this question doesn’t have to be a work-related one and definitely cannot be one with shallow cultural involvement such as “I was a tourist in Thailand for a week.” You need not have travelled the globe for you to be aware of the different cultures around you, especially in a globally connected world. I myself talked about the different cultures growing in India as one part of the population modernizes swiftly while another holds on to more traditional values and how this dichotomy affects me as someone who is a part of both worlds. All of us have been touched by cultural diversity on some level and this question asks you to share a very intimate, personal experience with the admissions team.

We’ve all heard this piece of advice when starting MBA applications – be yourself, don’t project yourself as the admissions committee wants to see you. Yet, we often try to find out what are the key characteristics a school is known for and tailor our essays accordingly. For INSEAD, I can truly say, relax and be yourself. The committee wants to know you personally because that is the way things are done at INSEAD.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Selecting an MBA Program Using Big Data and Data Visualization [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2015, 04:00
FROM Insead Admissions Blog: Selecting an MBA Program Using Big Data and Data Visualization
Image

Many MBA programs strive for international diversity and publish statistics portraying the demographics of their classes. Aside from numbers alone, it is often useful to visualize the data to gain additional insights.

INSEAD, with campuses in Fontainebleau (France), Singapore, and Abu Dhabi, is where I made the decision to study. Since I was first contacted by admissions with the good news of my acceptance as a Round 1 candidate, it was truly incredible to see a strong community form. Social media groups were abuzz with introductions, meet-ups were planned in all corners of the earth, and classmates helped each other figure out the logistics of finding accommodation, acquiring visas, and getting ready to (in many cases) move abroad to embark on an incredible year of learning, professional development (and fun).

I had the fortune of choosing between multiple offers of admission for my MBA program. Data visualization (through the creation and use of “infographics”) along with big data, were both tools I used to look beyond the schools’ brochures and truly understand the particular demographics of each program. All my choices were excellent from an educational standpoint, having good reputations, seasoned professors, and a high number of academic publications. What was not evidently clear, in neither marketing materials nor public rankings, was what many alumni recognize as the greatest benefit of a graduate business education – the strength of the network you develop with your fellow students and alumni.

LinkedIn has delved into this very space by helping prospective students make decision boards to aid them in navigating the admissions process. By mapping out the network of alumni from schools all over the world, it is now possible to see which schools specific employers target for recruitment, which sectors alumni work in upon graduation, and where alumni call home.

While many universities tout the international diversity of their students, and many universities list over 100 nationalities forming their class and alumni demographic, one aspect quickly differentiated INSEAD from the competition: the distribution of alumni across different nationalities. Many of the top-ranked schools have a great diversity of students and alumni, but they typically have a disproportionately high amount of students from their home country and many scattered minorities. At INSEAD, everyone is a minority because historically, no more than 15% of the alumni network represents any single nationality. The result is a much more even distribution of alumni across the world and a far more resilient international network. What is true in the aggregate, is also true for each and every MBA graduating class as evidenced in the (unofficial) demographics for the class of July 2016.

From its humble beginnings in 1957, INSEAD has remained true to its founding principles in creating an environment of diversity, in which everyone has equal claim to raise questions, and where everyone learns to cooperate with each other regardless of race, religion, or gender. It is therefore no surprise that INSEAD has been touted “The Business School for the World”.

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Selecting an MBA Program Using Big Data and Data Visualization [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2015, 04:01
FROM Insead Admissions Blog1: Selecting an MBA Program Using Big Data and Data Visualization
Image

Many MBA programs strive for international diversity and publish statistics portraying the demographics of their classes. Aside from numbers alone, it is often useful to visualize the data to gain additional insights.

INSEAD, with campuses in Fontainebleau (France), Singapore, and Abu Dhabi, is where I made the decision to study. Since I was first contacted by admissions with the good news of my acceptance as a Round 1 candidate, it was truly incredible to see a strong community form. Social media groups were abuzz with introductions, meet-ups were planned in all corners of the earth, and classmates helped each other figure out the logistics of finding accommodation, acquiring visas, and getting ready to (in many cases) move abroad to embark on an incredible year of learning, professional development (and fun).

I had the fortune of choosing between multiple offers of admission for my MBA program. Data visualization (through the creation and use of “infographics”) along with big data, were both tools I used to look beyond the schools’ brochures and truly understand the particular demographics of each program. All my choices were excellent from an educational standpoint, having good reputations, seasoned professors, and a high number of academic publications. What was not evidently clear, in neither marketing materials nor public rankings, was what many alumni recognize as the greatest benefit of a graduate business education – the strength of the network you develop with your fellow students and alumni.

LinkedIn has delved into this very space by helping prospective students make decision boards to aid them in navigating the admissions process. By mapping out the network of alumni from schools all over the world, it is now possible to see which schools specific employers target for recruitment, which sectors alumni work in upon graduation, and where alumni call home.

While many universities tout the international diversity of their students, and many universities list over 100 nationalities forming their class and alumni demographic, one aspect quickly differentiated INSEAD from the competition: the distribution of alumni across different nationalities. Many of the top-ranked schools have a great diversity of students and alumni, but they typically have a disproportionately high amount of students from their home country and many scattered minorities. At INSEAD, everyone is a minority because historically, no more than 15% of the alumni network represents any single nationality. The result is a much more even distribution of alumni across the world and a far more resilient international network. What is true in the aggregate, is also true for each and every MBA graduating class as evidenced in the (unofficial) demographics for the class of July 2016.

From its humble beginnings in 1957, INSEAD has remained true to its founding principles in creating an environment of diversity, in which everyone has equal claim to raise questions, and where everyone learns to cooperate with each other regardless of race, religion, or gender. It is therefore no surprise that INSEAD has been touted “The Business School for the World”.

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2015, 22:47
Hi All,

I was wondering if any INSEAD alumni or current students might be able to answer my question. I'm currently working on writing my essays for my INSEAD application and INSEAD's job essays this year have no recommended word count. It merely says "Short answer". I contacted INSEAD to ask and they said there was no word limit, which leaves me with the question how long should my short answer be?

Presently my job essays are anything but short, especially the one that says "Please give a full description of your career since graduating from university. Describe your career path with the rationale behind your choices." I've got 7 years experience and have worked in 3 very different industries so there's a lot of ground to cover. So far, my word count for this "short answer" is up to 800+...

Does it matter?

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2015, 23:53
800 is definitely way too much. I would stick more or less to last years word count +- 50 words.

Google is your friend here :)

From memory I think it was 250 words per job essay but pls double check

Good luck

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!! [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2015, 00:21
Bexpat wrote:
800 is definitely way too much. I would stick more or less to last years word count +- 50 words.

Google is your friend here :)

From memory I think it was 250 words per job essay but pls double check

Good luck


:shock: Last year's was something like 350 I think. Even so it's way too few words to squeeze 7 years of work and projects and give a rationale behind movement too :cry:

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Re: Calling all INSEAD Applicants (Sept 2016 Intake) Class of July 2017!!   [#permalink] 29 Aug 2015, 00:21

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