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John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 11:24
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John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park

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New post 01 Aug 2015, 14:26
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reto wrote:
John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park


Hello reto

According to Manhattan two modifiers in a row is bad:

"Avoid long sequences of modifiers that modify the same noun. Putting two long modifiers in a row before or after a noun can lead to awkward or incorrect phrasings.
Wrong: George Carlin, both shocking and entertaining audiences across the nation, who also struggled publicly with drug abuse, influenced and inspired a generation of comedians.
The misplaced modifier who also struggled publicly with drug abuse should be next to George Carlin, not nation.

----------------------

Here is another explanation from Manhattan instructor:


"The problem, though, is that we can't stack two modifiers in a row if they're modifying the same thing. Effectively, what we have is:
Subject, adverbial modifier, adverbial modifier, verb...
We need to conjoin these modifiers (if they're modifying the same thing), or change one of them to modify something else. "

---------------------

And another explanation from the same instructor

"As a general rule, you should avoid putting two modifiers that modify the same thing in a row.

Wrong: Modifier, modifier, thing being modified.
Right: Modifier, thing being modified, modifier.


In this sentence, we have two modifiers in a row: Marking..., featuring..., the festival is celebrated...

If there were a conjunction instead - marking... and featuring..., the festival... - that would have been correct, because "marking and featuring" would have been a single conjoined modifier."
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New post Updated on: 31 Jul 2015, 00:41
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This is a pretty tough question for an old hag like me. I don’t know what made John fall in love; As per the passage, I construe that he fell in love when (whenever) he saw a woman sitting on bench; probably there will be so many women sitting on the bench. Who will then John fall in love with? Really confusing.

The second part of having long hair is also a mystery to me. The passage seems to imply that there should be a woman in the park; she should be sitting on the bench; she should have a long hair and the hair should be shimmering in the sun; too difficult for all of them to coincide, I suppose. Thank God, the passage does not mention anything about the length of John’s hair.

So let me not go through the meaning route but try via grammar.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – a relative pronoun should denote the noun it touches and hence this a wrong choice; after all park does not sport long hairs.
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – same critical reasoning --- bench, does not have long hair.
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park --- a women is obviously wrong;
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun --- I dismiss this choice, as this misses the most important cause of John's falling in love, namely the long hair. You see John fancies the length of the hair in a woman more than any other
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park--- This is the only choice left; if I reject this also, all my labor will go to waste. But let me put forth my doubt. What was sitting on the bench? Obviously not the sun, but is it the long hair?

Sorry, I give up
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Originally posted by daagh on 30 Jul 2015, 22:56.
Last edited by daagh on 31 Jul 2015, 00:41, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2015, 00:03
daagh wrote:
This is a pretty tough question for an old hag like me. I don’t know what made John fall in love; As per the passage, I construe that he fell in love when (whenever) he saw a woman sitting on bench; probably there will be so many women sitting on the bench. Who will then John fall in love with? Really confusing.

The second part of having long hair is also a mystery to me. The passage seems to imply that there should be a woman in the park; she should be sitting on the bench; she should have a long hair and the hair should be shimmering in the sun; too difficult for all of them to coincide, I suppose. Thank God, the passage does not mention anything about the length of john’s hair.

So let me not go through the meaning route but try via grammar.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – a relative pronoun should denote the noun it ouches and hence this a wrong choice; after all park does not sport long hairs.
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – same critical reasoning --- bench, does not have long hair.
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park --- a women is obviously wrong;
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun --- I dismiss this choice, as this misses the most important cause of John's falling in love, namely the long hair. You see John fancies the length of the hair in a woman more than any other
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park--- This is the only choice left; if I reject this also, all my labor will go to waste. But let me put forth my doubt. What was sitting on the bench? Obviously not the sun, but is it the long hair?

Sorry, I give up


I really like your thoughts :lol: You're right at all. For the last answer choice you might be too harsh saying that the "sitting on a bench in the park" modifies the sun or hair - for me this sentence leaves no doubt that the last modifier refers to the woman since the first modifier refers to the women too - couldnt you add here 100 more modifiers which refer to the woman?

This is just my understanding.

Thanks for your post :)
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New post 31 Jul 2015, 01:48
Dear reto, I agree with you that any number of modifiers can modify one noun. I stand corrected vis-a-vis E.
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2015, 11:58
This doesn't seem to be a very GMATish question. Sorry if I'm wrong. Feel free to correct me.
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2016, 00:32
daagh wrote:
This is a pretty tough question for an old hag like me. I don’t know what made John fall in love; As per the passage, I construe that he fell in love when (whenever) he saw a woman sitting on bench; probably there will be so many women sitting on the bench. Who will then John fall in love with? Really confusing.

The second part of having long hair is also a mystery to me. The passage seems to imply that there should be a woman in the park; she should be sitting on the bench; she should have a long hair and the hair should be shimmering in the sun; too difficult for all of them to coincide, I suppose. Thank God, the passage does not mention anything about the length of John’s hair.

So let me not go through the meaning route but try via grammar.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – a relative pronoun should denote the noun it touches and hence this a wrong choice; after all park does not sport long hairs.
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – same critical reasoning --- bench, does not have long hair.
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park --- a women is obviously wrong;
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun --- I dismiss this choice, as this misses the most important cause of John's falling in love, namely the long hair. You see John fancies the length of the hair in a woman more than any other
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park--- This is the only choice left; if I reject this also, all my labor will go to waste. But let me put forth my doubt. What was sitting on the bench? Obviously not the sun, but is it the long hair?

Sorry, I give up


Hi,

I didnt really understand the issue in Option A. Per my understanding "whose" is a Relative Pronoun Modifier and has the privilege of modifying a far away noun unless its ambiguous.
In this context, Park's long hair shimmered in the sun ..
and
Bench's long hair shimmered in the sun

does not make sense. And hence the only reference here is " long hair of a woman". Based on this analysis, I feel Option A is correct. Please let me know your thoughts.
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2016, 11:05
andy2502 wrote:
daagh wrote:
This is a pretty tough question for an old hag like me. I don’t know what made John fall in love; As per the passage, I construe that he fell in love when (whenever) he saw a woman sitting on bench; probably there will be so many women sitting on the bench. Who will then John fall in love with? Really confusing.

The second part of having long hair is also a mystery to me. The passage seems to imply that there should be a woman in the park; she should be sitting on the bench; she should have a long hair and the hair should be shimmering in the sun; too difficult for all of them to coincide, I suppose. Thank God, the passage does not mention anything about the length of John’s hair.

So let me not go through the meaning route but try via grammar.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – a relative pronoun should denote the noun it touches and hence this a wrong choice; after all park does not sport long hairs.
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – same critical reasoning --- bench, does not have long hair.
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park --- a women is obviously wrong;
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun --- I dismiss this choice, as this misses the most important cause of John's falling in love, namely the long hair. You see John fancies the length of the hair in a woman more than any other
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park--- This is the only choice left; if I reject this also, all my labor will go to waste. But let me put forth my doubt. What was sitting on the bench? Obviously not the sun, but is it the long hair?

Sorry, I give up


Hi,

I didnt really understand the issue in Option A. Per my understanding "whose" is a Relative Pronoun Modifier and has the privilege of modifying a far away noun unless its ambiguous.
In this context, Park's long hair shimmered in the sun ..
and
Bench's long hair shimmered in the sun

does not make sense. And hence the only reference here is " long hair of a woman". Based on this analysis, I feel Option A is correct. Please let me know your thoughts.


I agree with your point. Moreover option E (the OA) is definitely wrong. The present participle modifier " sitting on a bench in the park" seems to refer to the subject of the previous clause "John" rather than "woman".
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2016, 19:04
sayantanc2k wrote:
andy2502 wrote:
daagh wrote:
This is a pretty tough question for an old hag like me. I don’t know what made John fall in love; As per the passage, I construe that he fell in love when (whenever) he saw a woman sitting on bench; probably there will be so many women sitting on the bench. Who will then John fall in love with? Really confusing.

The second part of having long hair is also a mystery to me. The passage seems to imply that there should be a woman in the park; she should be sitting on the bench; she should have a long hair and the hair should be shimmering in the sun; too difficult for all of them to coincide, I suppose. Thank God, the passage does not mention anything about the length of John’s hair.

So let me not go through the meaning route but try via grammar.

A. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – a relative pronoun should denote the noun it touches and hence this a wrong choice; after all park does not sport long hairs.
B. woman sitting in the park on a bench, whose long hair shimmered in the sun – same critical reasoning --- bench, does not have long hair.
C. women, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park --- a women is obviously wrong;
D. woman sitting on a bench in the park, whose hair shimmered in the sun --- I dismiss this choice, as this misses the most important cause of John's falling in love, namely the long hair. You see John fancies the length of the hair in a woman more than any other
E. woman, whose long hair shimmered in the sun, sitting on a bench in the park--- This is the only choice left; if I reject this also, all my labor will go to waste. But let me put forth my doubt. What was sitting on the bench? Obviously not the sun, but is it the long hair?

Sorry, I give up


Hi,

I didnt really understand the issue in Option A. Per my understanding "whose" is a Relative Pronoun Modifier and has the privilege of modifying a far away noun unless its ambiguous.
In this context, Park's long hair shimmered in the sun ..
and
Bench's long hair shimmered in the sun

does not make sense. And hence the only reference here is " long hair of a woman". Based on this analysis, I feel Option A is correct. Please let me know your thoughts.


I agree with your point. Moreover option E (the OA) is definitely wrong. The present participle modifier " sitting on a bench in the park" seems to refer to the subject of the previous clause "John" rather than "woman".


To me, both (A) and (E) are grammatically correct. The only difference is that in (A) woman is sitting on the bench and in (E) John is sitting on the bench. He can sit on bench and fall in love :-D

LOL
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New post 13 Nov 2016, 12:09
manhasnoname wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
andy2502 wrote:

Hi,

I didnt really understand the issue in Option A. Per my understanding "whose" is a Relative Pronoun Modifier and has the privilege of modifying a far away noun unless its ambiguous.
In this context, Park's long hair shimmered in the sun ..
and
Bench's long hair shimmered in the sun

does not make sense. And hence the only reference here is " long hair of a woman". Based on this analysis, I feel Option A is correct. Please let me know your thoughts.


I agree with your point. Moreover option E (the OA) is definitely wrong. The present participle modifier " sitting on a bench in the park" seems to refer to the subject of the previous clause "John" rather than "woman".


To me, both (A) and (E) are grammatically correct. The only difference is that in (A) woman is sitting on the bench and in (E) John is sitting on the bench. He can sit on bench and fall in love :-D

LOL


When there are two grammatically correct sentences among the options, the one that retains the meaning of the original sentence should be selected. So option A is better than option E.
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Re: John first fell in love when he saw a woman sitting on a bench in the  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Dec 2016, 19:37
I think E is definitely correct.

Reletive pronoun modifier (1) - "whose long hair shimmered in the sun" is encapsulated between 2 commas and provides additional info about "woman".

Verb-ing modifier (2) - "sitting on a bench in the park" modifies the noun "woman". Comma before "sitting" is a part of modifier 1.

So, the sentence as a whole is structured as : John first fell in love when he saw a woman(,whose long hair shimmered in the sun,)(sitting on a bench in the park)..... with both the modifiers modifying noun woman.

IMO, below is the reason for choice A to be incorrect.
Relative pronoun modifier has the privilege to modify far away nouns only when there is no better (and correct) placement possible for additional info b/w Noun and Relative pronoun. Here, in this sentence, a better (and correct) placement of this additional info is possible (as depicted by choice E). So, E is a better choice than A.

Please let me know if I am missing something here.
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New post 12 Dec 2016, 08:41
ankur2710 wrote:
I think E is definitely correct.

Reletive pronoun modifier (1) - "whose long hair shimmered in the sun" is encapsulated between 2 commas and provides additional info about "woman".

Verb-ing modifier (2) - "sitting on a bench in the park" modifies the noun "woman". Comma before "sitting" is a part of modifier 1.

So, the sentence as a whole is structured as : John first fell in love when he saw a woman(,whose long hair shimmered in the sun,)(sitting on a bench in the park)..... with both the modifiers modifying noun woman.

IMO, below is the reason for choice A to be incorrect.
Relative pronoun modifier has the privilege to modify far away nouns only when there is no better (and correct) placement possible for additional info b/w Noun and Relative pronoun. Here, in this sentence, a better (and correct) placement of this additional info is possible (as depicted by choice E). So, E is a better choice than A.

Please let me know if I am missing something here.


In E, the modifier "sitting..." may as well refer to the subject of the previous clause " John". In the real GMAT the OA is not expected to have such ambiguity.
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