GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 22 Oct 2018, 06:01

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4493
Re: More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Aug 2017, 16:09
1
harshdeep12 wrote:
mikemcgarry - Hello Mike, can you please help me to figure out the correct answer between Option E and B. I was able to figure out the rest of the choices by the identifying the idiom tested(from..to), But really can't chose between B and E. Also, is the usage of present continuous tense correct in option E? Thanks:)

Dear harshdeep12,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, many Veritas questions are wonderful. I think this one is atrocious. It's tagged as Veritas: I don't know whether that is true.

One screaming issue that is not addressed is the "like" vs. "such as" split for listing examples. All five answer choices have "formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic"--embarrassing! A few answer choices have "energy-hungry nations such as India and China," but the OA has "energy-hungry nations like India and China"--not GMAT-like at all!

It's bizarre that the whole sentence is underlined, even though a few words at the beginning and end are the same in all five answer choices. That's also not GMAT-like.

Choice (B) has the unnecessary "has" in the first clause--"More than has any of its competitors." It appears the source believes this is reason to prefer (B) to (E). It's true that the word "has" is not necessary and it's a little awkward to include it, but it's odd that the choice between these two choices rests only on this one detail, especially since other details are incorrect. For such a long prompt, only niggling little details are changed among the five answer choices: there aren't large scale structure changes, as there typically would be on the GMAT if the whole sentence were underlined. There are a variety of ways in which this question falls short of the ideal established by the GMAT.

This is a very poor question. As a general rule, I don't think it helps to dive into the logic of poorly designed questions.

Here's a high quality SC practice question:
Becquerel's discovery of radioactivity

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Magoosh Discount CodesOptimus Prep Discount CodesMath Revolution Discount Codes
SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 1842
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 20:40
mikemcgarry wrote:
Dear harshdeep12,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, many Veritas questions are wonderful. I think this one is atrocious. It's tagged as Veritas: I don't know whether that is true.

One screaming issue that is not addressed is the "like" vs. "such as" split for listing examples. All five answer choices have "formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic"--embarrassing! A few answer choices have "energy-hungry nations such as India and China," but the OA has "energy-hungry nations like India and China"--not GMAT-like at all!

It's bizarre that the whole sentence is underlined, even though a few words at the beginning and end are the same in all five answer choices. That's also not GMAT-like.

Choice (B) has the unnecessary "has" in the first clause--"More than has any of its competitors." It appears the source believes this is reason to prefer (B) to (E). It's true that the word "has" is not necessary and it's a little awkward to include it, but it's odd that the choice between these two choices rests only on this one detail, especially since other details are incorrect. For such a long prompt, only niggling little details are changed among the five answer choices: there aren't large scale structure changes, as there typically would be on the GMAT if the whole sentence were underlined. There are a variety of ways in which this question falls short of the ideal established by the GMAT.

This is a very poor question. As a general rule, I don't think it helps to dive into the logic of poorly designed questions.

Here's a high quality SC practice question:
Becquerel's discovery of radioactivity

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Dear mikemcgarry,

I hope you are well :)

I seek your help in understanding many issues in the above sentence. It is really a Veritas question. In the previous, someone posted the official answer. Here it:

"Here is the official explanation from Veritas.

Answer E - The dominant decision point in this question is "and" vs. "to" in the back half of the sentence. Because of construction "bringing X from...", "to" is required to create a logical meaning, so the "and" choices (A, C, and D) are incorrect. Furthermore, the choices that include a verb ("has" or "have") in the beginning of the sentence in the modifier do not offer a direct verb for "has done what?", and so they are also incorrect. Choice E uses a proper modifier and the correct "to" connection, so it is correct."

According to the explanation above by Veritas, B is eliminated because choice include verb 'has' or have without any any direct object. I think, there is ellipses which meaning is implied. So it is wrong from grammar point of view but it is unnecessary as you pointed out. Is it true or wrong?

I have other concern the puzzled me in English. An instructor eliminated choice B on the ground that it should be plural and hence must be have.

As far as I know in English. 'Any' must take singular verb. Am I right or wrong??

Thanks in advance
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4493
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2017, 11:16
Mo2men wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

I hope you are well :)

I seek your help in understanding many issues in the above sentence. It is really a Veritas question. In the previous, someone posted the official answer. Here it:

"Here is the official explanation from Veritas.

Answer E - The dominant decision point in this question is "and" vs. "to" in the back half of the sentence. Because of construction "bringing X from...", "to" is required to create a logical meaning, so the "and" choices (A, C, and D) are incorrect. Furthermore, the choices that include a verb ("has" or "have") in the beginning of the sentence in the modifier do not offer a direct verb for "has done what?", and so they are also incorrect. Choice E uses a proper modifier and the correct "to" connection, so it is correct."

According to the explanation above by Veritas, B is eliminated because choice include verb 'has' or have without any any direct object. I think, there is ellipses which meaning is implied. So it is wrong from grammar point of view but it is unnecessary as you pointed out. Is it true or wrong?

I have other concern the puzzled me in English. An instructor eliminated choice B on the ground that it should be plural and hence must be have.

As far as I know in English. 'Any' must take singular verb. Am I right or wrong??

Thanks in advance

Dear Mo2men,

Good to hear from you, my friend. :-) I'm happy to respond. :-)

Yes, the "from" ==> "to" construction is necessary and appears in only (B) & (E). That's why I only discussed those two. The "has" in (B) is not "missing" anything. This is a grammatically correct ellipsis, and what has been omitted is not a direct object but the main verb. If anything, the "has" is awkward because it's not necessary--it too can be omitted!

As indicated above, I find strong reasons to reject all five answer choices and the question itself.

The word "any" is very trick. In a purely logical analysis, it would seem to imply "any one" and so demand a singular verb. In practice, though, it does take plural verbs. I could say either version:
I don't know whether any single friend of mine is coming to the party.
I don't know whether any of my friends are coming to the party.

The former is a little more emphatic, implying that I will be surprised if even one friend shows up. The second indicates the uncertain action of multiple members in a group.

In this sentence, either could be correct.
More than have any of its competitors . . .
More than has any of its competitors . . .

These have different emphases, different implications, but neither is "wrong" from a grammatical perspective.

Does all this make sense?

Take care, my friend.
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 1842
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2017, 11:27
mikemcgarry wrote:
In this sentence, either could be correct.
More than have any of its competitors . . .
More than has any of its competitors . . .

These have different emphases, different implications, but neither is "wrong" from a grammatical perspective.

Does all this make sense?

Take care, my friend.
Mike :-)


Thanks Mike for your prompt response.

After sending my questions to you today, I searched for the topic in Google and it seems the topic is controversial in English forums.

Does GMAT test those controversial issues about 'any'?
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4493
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2017, 12:00
Mo2men wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
In this sentence, either could be correct.
More than have any of its competitors . . .
More than has any of its competitors . . .

These have different emphases, different implications, but neither is "wrong" from a grammatical perspective.

Does all this make sense?

Take care, my friend.
Mike :-)


Thanks Mike for your prompt response.

After sending my questions to you today, I searched for the topic in Google and it seems the topic is controversial in English forums.

Does GMAT test those controversial issues about 'any'?

Dear Mo2men,

My friend, as a general rule, the GMAT steers clear of controversy. If something is controversial, it will not be tested directly on the GMAT.

For example, a far more controversial topic is splitting an infinitive. Grammatical conservatives, such as I, avoid this, while grammatical liberals think that it's perfectly fine: one can find rants for both view on the web. The GMAT would never test this, although every once in a while, a split infinitive will appear in an answer choice that is incorrect for other reasons.

I suspect that, in similar fashion, anything that the GMAT considered wrong in the usage of "any" would appear only in answer choices incorrect for other definitive reasons. In other words, this would not be a deciding split.

Does all this make sense, my friend?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 May 2017
Posts: 2
Re: More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2017, 18:58
+1
I also couldn't understand why b is incorrect. Can someone please help ?
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 2040
Premium Member CAT Tests
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2017, 21:49
manugmat123 wrote:
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, is staking its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic and energy-hungry nations like India and China.

A) More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, is staking its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic and energy-hungry nations like India and China.
B) More than has any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, has staked its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic to energy-hungry nations like India and China.
C) More so than any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, is staking its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic and energy-hungry nations such as India and China.
D) More than any of its competitors have, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, staked its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic and energy-hungry nations such as India and China.
E) More than any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will release its annual earnings report on Friday, is staking its future on the business of bringing shale gas from formerly inaccessible locations like the Arctic to energy-hungry nations like India and China.

HimG15 wrote:
+1
I also couldn't understand why b is incorrect. Can someone please help ?

HimG15 , have you read the posts above, especially those from mikemcgarry ?

If not, please read this post, then Mo2men 's reply, and finally, mikemcgarry 's response.

If you have read them, and you still feel lost, I will be happy to try to help.
I have very little to add to Mike McGarry 's insightful analysis.

I will emphasize: No real GMAT question would hang by a thread this thin.
(And it would not use the word "like" to list examples!)

Try not to worry about this question.

All due respect to Veritas: everyone gets it wrong sometimes.

This question is not a good practice tool.

Quote:
There are a variety of ways in which this question falls short of the ideal established by the GMAT.

This is a very poor question. As a general rule, I don't think it helps to dive into the logic of poorly designed questions.

Your instincts were good; the question bothered you.

I hope that helps. If it does not, ask again, perhaps with a little more specificity? :-)
_________________

___________________________________________________________________
For what are we born if not to aid one another?
-- Ernest Hemingway

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Mar 2017
Posts: 49
Location: India
Schools: SMU '19 (A), LBS
GMAT 1: 670 Q48 V33
GPA: 3.3
Re: More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2018, 03:32
Hiii experts I am not able to eliminate B, I think it creates perfect ellipsis
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3623
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2018, 05:22
1
rajatkataria14@gmail.com wrote:
Hiii experts I am not able to eliminate B, I think it creates perfect ellipsis


Hey rajatkataria14@gmail.com ,

I think you missed the elements of comparison in the sentence.

The correct idiom is More than X, Y where X and Y must be ||.

Now, As per the meaning of the sentence, we are comparing Dynacorp with its competitors.

So, in B my X is "has any of its competitors" and Y is "Dynacorp".

This is wrong. We are not comparing any clause with the company. Hence, B is wrong.

Does that make sense?
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Check our new About Us Page here.

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Jan 2017
Posts: 28
GMAT ToolKit User
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Mar 2018, 05:43
rajatkataria14@gmail.com wrote:
Hiii experts I am not able to eliminate B, I think it creates perfect ellipsis


------------------------------------------------
GMAT Club Bot
More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will &nbs [#permalink] 17 Mar 2018, 05:43

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 30 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

More than have any of its competitors, Dynacorp, which will

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.