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The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,

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The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2010, 14:53
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A
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The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year.
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases.

Source: LSAT

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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 23:10
noboru wrote:
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year.
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases.

Source: LSAT


Premises:
Mayor - Avg ambulance turnaround time for top priority emergencies has been reduced.
The definition of top priority has been changed to remove gun shots and electrocutions - the time consuming cases.

Conclusion: Mayor's claim is a misrepresentation.

We want to strengthen the conclusion.

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year.
Total number of incidents is immaterial.

(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.
Financial priorities is out of scope.

(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”
The opinion of some has nothing to do with the conclusion. Note that generally only facts make conclusions stronger or weaker. Opinion of some does not.

(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.
There is no right or wrong way to define top-priority emergencies. We know that it included gunshot wounds last year but the definition has now been changed to not include gun shot wounds. IT doesn't make the definition wrong, just different. This difference has led to the misrepresentation.
How other cities define top-priority emergencies is irrelevant. We just care about last year vs this year in our city.

(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases.
If a big part of last year's emergencies were gunshot wounds & elec and this year, they are not included, this could explain the reduction in the average turnaround time. If last year gunshot wounds and elec accounted for a very small part of top priority emergencies, not including them would not have made much difference at all. But since a big part of last year emergencies weer gunshot wounds & elec, it does make sense that not including them will reduce the turnaround time without any actual difference on ground.

Hence (E) is correct.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2010, 20:47
IMO E

we are looking to strengthen conclusion ...even 5% strengthen would help ...in this case our conclusion is that "the redefinition of the term "top priorty" is the reason of the reduced time" --> to help with this conclusion we are provided with examples of heart attack, electrocution, etc


E) if "gunshot wounds and electrocution cases" were half of the cases. So there is a possibility that because we took these cases out, the overall time gets reduced because these were the cases that took the most time. Thus this somehow supports the conclusion better than others.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2010, 00:34
neoreaves wrote:
IMO E

we are looking to strengthen conclusion ...even 5% strengthen would help ...in this case our conclusion is that "the redefinition of the term "top priorty" is the reason of the reduced time" --> to help with this conclusion we are provided with examples of heart attack, electrocution, etc


E) if "gunshot wounds and electrocution cases" were half of the cases. So there is a possibility that because we took these cases out, the overall time gets reduced because these were the cases that took the most time. Thus this somehow supports the conclusion better than others.


Why no A?
If the number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year; and these are actually the top priority cases, that somehow also strengthen the conclusion, does not it?
Thanks.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2010, 06:44
E

Assume that there were 200 "top priority emergencies" last year. Of that 200, 100 were gunshot wounds and electrocutions. Simply by removing gunshot wounds and electrocutions from the top priority category, would cut the turnaround time in half.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2010, 13:48
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noboru wrote:
Why no A?
If the number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year; and these are actually the top priority cases, that somehow also strengthen the conclusion, does not it?
Thanks.


I agree with E for the above explanations.

Noboru, I would say that A in not good because what the argument focuses on is the fact that the mayor redefined the top priorities.
To strenghten the argument we need to continue to focus on this by showing how the fact that the top priorities emergencies no longer include the shotgun wounds and electructions had an impact on the decreased average time.
With A, we only show that the heart attacks and strokes declined, but this doesn't help without knowing about the shotgun wounds and electructions.

Hope this helps...

can you confirm OA?
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2010, 14:10
E seems to be good 2.

But for A, suppose number of wounds had remained unchanged, and number of heart attack was increased. In this case it will strengthen the conclusion.
When they have limited 'Top Priority' to heart attack then why we have to only consider wounds?

How does it matter wounds changed or not? we have redefined our priorities.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2010, 15:59
E is better choice than A.
Although cases of heart attacks and strokes declined this year, we dont know how much the rate of decline can affect the turnaround time.
As in E, if half of the cases were reported from the scenarios that took maximum time and that are not included in top priority this year, then turnaround time will decrease irrespective of heart attacks and strokes cases reported this year.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2010, 20:30
1
what is the OA?
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 31 Dec 2013, 07:38
2
(A) is clearly out, since the argument says "time reduction" for the "Top Priority Emergencies" in current year. As compared to the last year time consuming tasks like gunshots/ electro.. excluded in current year. So if these "time consuming tasks" occupy more than 50% of the jobs in last year than this certainly strengthen the conclusion that redefining (removing time consuming jobs) top priority does reduce the time.
E is correct answer!!!!

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Originally posted by WillGetIt on 31 Dec 2013, 04:41.
Last edited by WillGetIt on 31 Dec 2013, 07:38, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2013, 05:34
CONCLUSION- It is a serious misrepresentation that the average ambulance turnaround time has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies.
premise- 1. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.”
2. Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

WE ARE LOOKING AT AVERAGE TURNAROUND TIME...we have to prove that by redefining top priority cases the AVERAGE turnaround time reduces.... therefore, by reduction of gunshot and wound cases, average turnaround time for top priority cases has reduced....................

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year...... turnaround time will not change.... wrong
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.... irrelevant
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency......experts can continue to disagree..... wrong
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.......why bother about what OTHERS do.....
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases..... yes this will affect the average... which WILL REDUCE.....CORRECT....
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2013, 09:10
My process:

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year. - Do not have any correlations and do not strenghten at all - Incorrect
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year. - Who cares? - Incorrect
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.” - Who cares? - Incorrect
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies. - Who cares? - Incorrect
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. - Correct

Clear E for me but this question seems strange...

For further analysis: One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases : If the number of Gunshot would had been only 0.001% than the "redefinition" would had done any effects. But if it is 50%, than it had an effect.

Could we possibly have the OA?
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2014, 11:09
+1 for E,got it correct :idea:
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2017, 22:24
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

Boil it down -- Definition change to exclude most time-consuming cases ---> reduction in average turn around time
Pre-thinking -- These cases were significant enough in their occurrence to affect turn-around time (The most time-consuming cases did not very rarely -- i.e only 1-2 percent of total cases )

Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year. -- Irrelevant -- we are not bothered about the number of heart attacks and strokes for this year
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year. -- Irrelevant
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”-- Irrelevant
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.-- Incorrect -- but this does not say that redefinition led to decrease in turn around time
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. -- Correct

Answer E
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 02:35
Skywalker18 wrote:
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

Boil it down -- Definition change to exclude most time-consuming cases ---> reduction in average turn around time
Pre-thinking -- These cases were significant enough in their occurrence to affect turn-around time (The most time-consuming cases did not very rarely -- i.e only 1-2 percent of total cases )

Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year. -- Irrelevant -- we are not bothered about the number of heart attacks and strokes for this year
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year. -- Irrelevant
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”-- Irrelevant
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.-- Incorrect -- but this does not say that redefinition led to decrease in turn around time
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. -- Correct

Answer E


Hi Skywalker18,
I have a thought on option E. E states that one half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. Now, we dont know anything about this year. We are comparing the data and making an assumption that the same trend of gunshot wounds and electrocution cases will be this year and sibce these are excluded, the timearound time decreases. But, what if this year, we have gunshot wounds and electrocution cases negligible. Then author's argument is weakened.
Had the construction been One half of all of this year’s emergencies are gunshot wounds and electrocution cases make more sense to me. Pleas help me to understand where my understanding lacks.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 03:35
sunny91 wrote:
Skywalker18 wrote:
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.

Boil it down -- Definition change to exclude most time-consuming cases ---> reduction in average turn around time
Pre-thinking -- These cases were significant enough in their occurrence to affect turn-around time (The most time-consuming cases did not very rarely -- i.e only 1-2 percent of total cases )

Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year. -- Irrelevant -- we are not bothered about the number of heart attacks and strokes for this year
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year. -- Irrelevant
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”-- Irrelevant
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category o top-priority emergencies.-- Incorrect -- but this does not say that redefinition led to decrease in turn around time
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. -- Correct

Answer E


Hi Skywalker18,
I have a thought on option E. E states that one half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases. Now, we dont know anything about this year. We are comparing the data and making an assumption that the same trend of gunshot wounds and electrocution cases will be this year and sibce these are excluded, the timearound time decreases. But, what if this year, we have gunshot wounds and electrocution cases negligible. Then author's argument is weakened.
Had the construction been One half of all of this year’s emergencies are gunshot wounds and electrocution cases make more sense to me. Pleas help me to understand where my understanding lacks.


Hi sunny91 ,
We are not bothered about the proportion of last year's top-priority emergencies (gunshot wounds and electrocution cases) for this year because those cases have already been excluded for the current year's average ambulance turnaround time because of the redefinition of “top priority”.

This is the concept of weighted average.
--> Last year average turn around time was because of the contribution of gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases .
--> This year , the term top prority was redefined to exclude gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases .
--> Mayor's claim that average turn around time has been reduced this year , but the argument disputes that it was merely the redefinition of “top priority”.
--> So Last year, gunshot wounds and electrocutions were rare , so the turn around time for these cases will have little impact on total average .

Hope this helps!!
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New post 05 Jul 2018, 06:42
nightblade354 generis pikolo2510 GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma

I am stumped between D/E.

Quote:
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.


In year 2018 (for e.g) Average ambulance turnaround time ie time from the place where incident occurred (e.g. gunshot)
to hospital has been reduced as per Mayor.

Author responds to this by saying: This is a serious misrepresentation

On what basis does he make this claim: the reduction of time has no single definition. Earlier (say in year 2017) this time
was used to denote emergencies as gunshot wounds and electrocutions. Now is 2018, reduction time refers to heart attacks and strokes

Quote:
Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

I need to strengthen author's claim and oppose Mayor's claim that there is actual reduction in timing for ambulance turnaround.

Quote:
(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year.

As per me, this weakens the claim of author. If cases of heart diseases are less, than
Mayor's claim becomes stronger, not author's. Note that in present year, the 'priority'
has shifted from gunshot wounds and electrocutions to heart attacks and strokes

Quote:
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.

When did Mayor redefine the priorities is irrelevant to this argument.

Quote:
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”

So what? Even if they disagree, this does not affect author's claim in any manner. Reject it.

Quote:
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category of top-priority emergencies.
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases.

Are we not looking for an answer choice that says other cities if include heart attacks and strokes in 'top
priority' emergencies, then author's claim is strengthened?

Why is underlined portion of (E) relevant to argument, when we need more cases pertaining to heart attacks and strokes
since we are talking about present and not past year.
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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time,  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2018, 06:55
adkikani wrote:
nightblade354 generis pikolo2510 GMATNinja VeritasPrepKarishma

I am stumped between D/E.

Quote:
The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, the time from summons to delivery of the patient, has been reduced this year for top-priority emergencies. This is a serious misrepresentation. This “reduction” was produced simply by redefining “top priority.” Such emergencies used to include gunshot wounds and electrocutions, the most time-consuming cases. Now they are limited strictly to heart attacks and strokes.


In year 2018 (for e.g) Average ambulance turnaround time ie time from the place where incident occurred (e.g. gunshot)
to hospital has been reduced as per Mayor.

Author responds to this by saying: This is a serious misrepresentation

On what basis does he make this claim: the reduction of time has no single definition. Earlier (say in year 2017) this time
was used to denote emergencies as gunshot wounds and electrocutions. Now is 2018, reduction time refers to heart attacks and strokes

Quote:
Which one of the following would strengthen the author’s conclusion that it was the redefinition of “top priority” that produced the reduction in turnaround time?

I need to strengthen author's claim and oppose Mayor's claim that there is actual reduction in timing for ambulance turnaround.

Quote:
(A) The number of heart attacks and strokes declined this year.

As per me, this weakens the claim of author. If cases of heart diseases are less, than
Mayor's claim becomes stronger, not author's. Note that in present year, the 'priority'
has shifted from gunshot wounds and electrocutions to heart attacks and strokes

Quote:
(B) The mayor redefined the city’s financial priorities this year.

When did Mayor redefine the priorities is irrelevant to this argument.

Quote:
(C) Experts disagree with the mayor’s definition of “top-priority emergency.”

So what? Even if they disagree, this does not affect author's claim in any manner. Reject it.

Quote:
(D) Other cities include gunshot wound cases in their category of top-priority emergencies.
(E) One half of all of last year’s top-priority emergencies were gunshot wounds and electrocution cases.

Are we not looking for an answer choice that says other cities if include heart attacks and strokes in 'top
priority' emergencies, then author's claim is strengthened?

Why is underlined portion of (E) relevant to argument, when we need more cases pertaining to heart attacks and strokes
since we are talking about present and not past year.


adkikani,

(D) is way out of scope. We do not care about other cities one bit. We just care about our city. This is a classic trick on CR questions. They will provide information that seems good, but has no bearing on the information given and does not help our case (for example, the city across the river, the neighbor next door, the other class, ect.). Unless we are comparing, these are irrelevant to the argument.

Does this help?
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New post 05 Jul 2018, 08:27
Hi nightblade354

Quote:
(D) is way out of scope. We do not care about other cities one bit. We just care about our city. This is a classic trick on CR questions. They will provide information that seems good, but has no bearing on the information given and does not help our case (for example, the city across the river, the neighbor next door, the other class, ect.). Unless we are comparing, these are irrelevant to the argument.


I apologize that I could not comprehend above quote. In a classic strengthen question, all I need to do
is to increase my belief in author's claim, not PROVE it. Similar questions are covered here and here (see quote by GMATNinja and
generis ) where in there is no explicit comparison made but the inference I made helped to increase my belief in author's claim.
What did I miss understanding here?
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New post 05 Jul 2018, 08:37
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adkikani wrote:
Hi nightblade354

Quote:
(D) is way out of scope. We do not care about other cities one bit. We just care about our city. This is a classic trick on CR questions. They will provide information that seems good, but has no bearing on the information given and does not help our case (for example, the city across the river, the neighbor next door, the other class, ect.). Unless we are comparing, these are irrelevant to the argument.


I apologize that I could not comprehend above quote. In a classic strengthen question, all I need to do
is to increase my belief in author's claim, not PROVE it. Similar questions are covered here and here (see quote by GMATNinja and @generis) where in there is no explicit comparison made but the inference I made helped to increase my belief in author's claim.
What did I miss understanding here?


You are correct about your statement. But how do know the cities are similar? What if one has 20000 hospitals and the other has 5? What if one is 400000 miles across and one is 4? These questions sink the possibility of comparison. For the criminologist question, the reason that the embezzlement one is eliminated is because the other option is far better. Though it is not recommended to go about eliminating answers this way, for the criminal one you have to assume that embezzlement and robbery are similar. I personally did not like the question because of that flaw.
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D-Day: November 18th, 2017

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Re: The mayor boasts that the average ambulance turnaround time, &nbs [#permalink] 05 Jul 2018, 08:37
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