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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that

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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2017, 22:57
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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of several different experimental designs.

(A) When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of

(B) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even with this theory true, the number could not ever be measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” using

(C) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could not ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of

(D) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” using

(E) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of

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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2017, 23:22
Mahmud6 wrote:
When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of several different experimental designs.

(A) When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of

(B) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even with this theory true, the number could not ever be measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” using

(C) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could not ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of

(D) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of “Avogadro’s number” using

(E) The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of “Avogadro’s number” by use of


A. Fragment

"That" must be followed by a clause that has both Subject and Verb. "Containing" is NOT a verb --> Fragment.

There is no Verb for Subject = many scientists --> Fragment

B. Fragment

There is no Verb for Subject = The chemist Amedeo Avogadro

C. Fragment

There is no Verb for Subject = many scientists

E. Like B

D. Looks good.

IMO D.



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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2017, 05:19
A. out .....posited that...scientist doubting....
B. out...positing that ...and many scientists doubted that...
C. posited that and many scientists doubting...
D. seems ok.
E. positing that ....scientist doubted that....not parallel.
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Re: When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 07:56
I feel its D.



A. When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases,at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

Fragment. The piece before ,but doesn't seem to stand on its own. 'use of' sounds awkward.

B. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

- The chemist Amedeo Avogadro would contain equal numbers of molecules - Nonsensical.

C. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

- 'use of' sounds awkward. Perrin has measured. Wrong tense form.

D. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

- Correct

E. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

The second part is a fragment
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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 08:02
When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of[/u] several different experimental designs.

A. When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, containing equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists, doubting that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

B. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), positing that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could not be ever measured, while in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

C. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, but many scientists doubted that, even if this theory is true, the number could never be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin has measured the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of

D. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, and many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could ever be measured, but in the early 20th century, Perrin measured the value of "Avogadro's number" using

E. The chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856), posited that equal volumes of different gases, at the same temperature and pressure, would contain equal numbers of molecules, although many scientists doubted that, even if this theory were true, the number could be ever measured, then in the early 20th century, Perrin, measuring the value of "Avogadro's number" by use of[/quote]

D.
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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2018, 07:14

Official Explanation:



The choices in this questions are rife with the famous "missing verb" mistake. Each main subject and each subject inside a "that" clause needs a full verb. In the discussion below, I will use AA to stand for the chemist Amedeo Avogadro.

In Choice (A), we get "AA posited" (good), but the inside the first "that" clause, we get "equal volumes . . . containing," a missing-verb problem. Also, the noun "many scientists" is a subject without a full verb. Choice (A) is incorrect.

In Choice (B), AA is a subject without a full verb: a missing-verb problem ("positing" is not a full verb here). Choice (B) is incorrect.

Choice (C) has no missing verb problems, but it is awkward in other ways. Everything up to the first "but" is flawless---although, having two "but's" is awkward in and of itself. The verb tense of "even if this theory is true" doesn't fit with the past narrative of the rest of the sentence. This version also has a strange illogical double-negative. What it is trying to say is that the many scientist doubted that the number could be measure; instead, what this says is that "many scientists doubted … the number could not ever be measured"----if they doubted it could not be measured, that means they think it would be measured! That's a change in meaning! For all these reasons, (C) is incorrect.

Choice (D) is mistake-free and promising.

Choice (E) has the awkward construction "the number could be ever measured"---"could ever be measured" would be more natural. Furthermore, the subject Perrin has no full verb: yet another missing-verb mistake. For these reasons, (E) is incorrect.

The only possible answer is choice (D).



FAQ: Why does the correct answer choice say "even if this theory were true"? Since "theory" is singular, shouldn't we use "was" instead of "were"?

The reason the verb is "were" rather than "was" is that we are talking about something that is counterfactual, and this requires the subjunctive mood.

Since this is past subjunctive, we need to use "were" instead of "was." The past subjunctive is only used with the verb "to be," and the form is always "were."

You can check out this lesson on subjunctive:

Verb Mood – Subjunctive



FAQ: Are both "by use of" and "using" correct?

Both "by use of" and "using" are technically correct, yes. However, if we were choosing between two otherwise identical sentences, the sentence containing "using" would be a much better choice. "By use of" is grammatically correct, but it isn't as concise. (It also sounds stuffy and outdated.)
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When chemist Amedeo Avogadro (1776 – 1856) posited that &nbs [#permalink] 22 May 2018, 07:14
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