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A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the

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A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2011, 20:10
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A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Source is jumbotests
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2011, 11:31
4
2
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


If you are putting in the effort to prepare for GMAT, don't use CAT material. Use material made specifically for GMAT. The type of questions in the two tests are very different. If some prep company is copying CAT questions and putting in their GMAT material, you need to re-think how to utilize your limited time. I agree that many conceptual questions can be useful for both, but just blindly putting CAT questions in GMAT prep tools makes me question their sincerity.

Anyway, just follow step by step instructions in this question.

"Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal."

3 leaph = 4 leapj
or 6 leaph = 8 leapj

"For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps."

time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
(from above)

"Find the ratio of their speeds."
If time taken is the same, Ratio of Speed = Ratio of distance covered
Ratio of distance covered in the same time = 8:5 (from above)

So ratio of speed = 8:5
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2011, 21:17
4
1
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


3 leaps of hare = 4 leaps of jackal


Every 6 leaps of hare jackal takes 5

Speed of hare = 6/3 = 2
Speed of Jackal = 5/4=1.25

ratio of speed = 2:1.25 = 8:5 (B)
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2011, 10:32
Thank you for the suggestion and solutions.
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2014, 06:39

g106 wrote:
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


3 leaps of hare = 4 leaps of jackal

Every 6 leaps of hare jackal takes 5

Speed of hare = 6/3 = 2
Speed of Jackal = 5/4=1.25

ratio of speed = 2:1.25 = 8:5 (B)


Excuse me but why do you say that the speed is 6/3 = 2?
Isn't that only the ratio between the first relation and the second one?

Cheers
J :)
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2014, 11:49
2
jlgdr wrote:

g106 wrote:
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


3 leaps of hare = 4 leaps of jackal

Every 6 leaps of hare jackal takes 5

Speed of hare = 6/3 = 2
Speed of Jackal = 5/4=1.25

ratio of speed = 2:1.25 = 8:5 (B)


Excuse me but why do you say that the speed is 6/3 = 2?
Isn't that only the ratio between the first relation and the second one?

Cheers
J :)


SO think about it like this

3 Leaps of the Hare =1 ft :wink:
4 Leaps of the Jackle= 1ft

for every 6 Leaps of the Hare
OR 2ft :wink: right, because 3 Leaps is 1 ft, so 6 leaps is 2ft which they showed as \(\frac{6 Leaps}{3Leaps}\)

The Jackle takes 5 Leaps
5 Leaps is 1ft and \(\frac{1}{4}\) of a foot

\(1.25*4\) and \(2*4\) = \(8:5\)

WE WANT WHOLE STEPS SO WE MULTIPLY OUR MIXED DECIMAL NUMBER INTO A WHOLE NUMBER
ITS A RATIO, SO WHAT YOU DO TO ONE SIDE YOU MUST DO TO THE OTHER

(\(1.25:2\)) \(*4\)

I really hope i was able to help :?
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2014, 03:35
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


If you are putting in the effort to prepare for GMAT, don't use CAT material. Use material made specifically for GMAT. The type of questions in the two tests are very different. If some prep company is copying CAT questions and putting in their GMAT material, you need to re-think how to utilize your limited time. I agree that many conceptual questions can be useful for both, but just blindly putting CAT questions in GMAT prep tools makes me question their sincerity.
Anyway, just follow step by step instructions in this question.

"Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal."

3 leaph = 4 leapj
or 6 leaph = 8 leapj

"For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps."

time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
(from above)

"Find the ratio of their speeds."
If time taken is the same, Ratio of Speed = Ratio of distance covered
Ratio of distance covered in the same time = 8:5 (from above)

So ratio of speed = 8:5


Hi Karishma , so are you implying that this question is not on GMAT pattern , maybe it is too difficult or any other reason .
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2014, 07:13
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj


Can someone explain this?
I didn't get why these lines are the same
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2014, 21:24
himanshujovi wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Possibly B.


Source is jumbotests


If you are putting in the effort to prepare for GMAT, don't use CAT material. Use material made specifically for GMAT. The type of questions in the two tests are very different. If some prep company is copying CAT questions and putting in their GMAT material, you need to re-think how to utilize your limited time. I agree that many conceptual questions can be useful for both, but just blindly putting CAT questions in GMAT prep tools makes me question their sincerity.
Anyway, just follow step by step instructions in this question.

"Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal."

3 leaph = 4 leapj
or 6 leaph = 8 leapj

"For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps."

time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
(from above)

"Find the ratio of their speeds."
If time taken is the same, Ratio of Speed = Ratio of distance covered
Ratio of distance covered in the same time = 8:5 (from above)

So ratio of speed = 8:5


Hi Karishma , so are you implying that this question is not on GMAT pattern , maybe it is too difficult or any other reason .


There is nothing wrong with the question - in fact I have made a GMAT question on this pattern (with modifications to make it suitable for GMAT) too. It is hard but it uses ratios and no advanced concept. If you get such a question in GMAT, it is fair play. The problem is with the source. If the source uses CAT questions without making them GMAT appropriate, you shouldn't use the source to prepare for GMAT. There are some popular CAT question such as buses running at regular intervals, train and bird, escalator questions etc. They are all based on very simple concepts but the application is tricky. If a prep company puts those questions in its GMAT prep material, there is nothing wrong with it but they must modify them suitably. GMAT has a worldwide clientele and the clarity of the question is paramount.

Also, I would guess that a company which puts lots of CAT questions in GMAT material perhaps does not have much of a GMAT focused team and hence would not be able to give you the insights and strategies provided by companies dedicated to GMAT.
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Re: Q: Ratio of speeds  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2014, 21:37
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ronr34 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj


Can someone explain this?
I didn't get why these lines are the same


The question is not very clear - as I said before - it is a very popular CAT question and people have come to understand what it means. Actually, this is what the question means:

A hare and a jackal are running a race. The distance covered by the hare in three leaps is equal to the distance covered by the jackal in four leaps. In the time that the hare takes six leaps, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

Size wise, 3 leaps of hare = 4 leaps of jackal
3 leaph = 4 leapj
6 leaph = 8 leapj
6 leaps of hare will be equal in distance to 8 leaps of jackal.

In the time that the hare takes six leaps, the jackal takes 5 leaps.
When the hare takes 6 leaps, they are equal to 8 leaps of jackal. In the same time, the jackal takes 5 leaps.

So in the same time, the hare and the jackal take 8 and 5 leaps respectively of equal size. So the distance they will cover in the same time will be in the ratio 8:5. So their speed will be in the ratio 8:5.
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2015, 16:45
let hare's leap=4 feet
let jackal's leap=3 feet
speed ratio of hare to jackal is (4)(6):(3)(5)=8:5
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2017, 04:10
2
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
ronr34 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
time in which hare takes 6 leaph = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj
time in which hare takes 8 leapj = time in which jackal takes 5 leapj


Can someone explain this?
I didn't get why these lines are the same


The question is not very clear - as I said before - it is a very popular CAT question and people have come to understand what it means. Actually, this is what the question means:

A hare and a jackal are running a race. The distance covered by the hare in three leaps is equal to the distance covered by the jackal in four leaps. In the time that the hare takes six leaps, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

Size wise, 3 leaps of hare = 4 leaps of jackal
3 leaph = 4 leapj
6 leaph = 8 leapj
6 leaps of hare will be equal in distance to 8 leaps of jackal.

In the time that the hare takes six leaps, the jackal takes 5 leaps.
When the hare takes 6 leaps, they are equal to 8 leaps of jackal. In the same time, the jackal takes 5 leaps.

So in the same time, the hare and the jackal take 8 and 5 leaps respectively of equal size. So the distance they will cover in the same time will be in the ratio 8:5. So their speed will be in the ratio 8:5.


Responding to a pm:
Quote:
what i can understand from stem that
distance hare covers =3units while at same Jackle will cover 4units
and time taken similarly is 6units by hare and thus 5 units by jackle

thus deducing the ratio of speed as distance /time
for hare D/T=3/6 and jackle it be 4/5
and hare /Jackle ==3/6*5/4==15/24==5/8 and marked 5/8 instead 8/5..
Please clear why i m wrong here??


"distance hare covers =3units while at same Jackle will cover 4units"

- Not correct.

"The distance covered by the hare in three leaps is equal to the distance covered by the jackal in four leaps." means

|------|------|------| 3 leaps of hare
|-----|----|----|----| 4 leaps of jackal

Distance covered is the same. Jackal has a smaller leap.

Also, I am not sure what you mean by:
"time taken similarly is 6 units by hare and thus 5 units by jackal"

Actually, the time in which the hare takes 6 leaps, the jackal takes only 5. So again hare is faster.

Check out the solution given above.
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2017, 21:44
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Source is jumbotests


Hi,
Notations:
\(L_{h}:\) distance traveled by the Hare in 1 leap.

\(L_{j}:\) distance traveled by the Jackal in 1 leap.

Given:
Three leaps of the Hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal.

=> \(3L_{h} = 4L_{j} = k\) (say)

=> \(L_{h} = \frac{k}{3} \textrm{ and } L_{j} = \frac{k}{4}\)


For every six leaps of the Hare, the Jackal takes 5 leaps.

Distance covered by Hare in six leaps = \(6 \times \frac{k}{3} = 2k\)

Distance covered by Jackal in 5 leaps = \(5 \times \frac{k}{4} = 1.25k\)

The ratio of their speed = 2k/1.25k = 200/125 = 8:5

Thanks.
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2017, 12:06
I tried to imagina a situation. the race:
3 leaps of H = 4 leaps of J
this means that leap of H is 4, and leaps of J is 3
when they run the distance it is 6*4 and 5*3
hence it is 24:15=>8:5
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2018, 07:22
stoy4o wrote:
A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the hare are equal to four leaps of the jackal. For every six leaps of the hare, the jackal takes 5 leaps. Find the ratio of their speeds.

A. 64:25
B. 8:5
C. 5:8
D. 25:64
E. None

Source is jumbotests



This is a very flawed question because it does not specify which ratio the question is asking for. Is it asking for the speed ratio of hare to Jackal (8:5) or the ratio of Jackal to hare (5:8)? Making it worse is that both solutions are in the answer choices. This is not a good quality GMAT question!
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Re: A hare and a jackal are running a race. Three leaps of the &nbs [#permalink] 02 Sep 2018, 07:22
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