GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 11 Dec 2019, 22:22

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A noob trying to master verbal

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Mar 2013
Posts: 7
A noob trying to master verbal  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Nov 2019, 23:15
Hi,

I am a non-native speaker and I scored 17 on my GMAT verbal section, which shows how weak I’m at it. Honestly speaking, i didn’t prepare for verbal section because I wasn’t even good at the basics. I spent 2 hours a day on quant concepts for a week and scored 49. I didnt like Math either in my childhood, but worked on it and now I love Math. That’s is what I want to do with my Verbal section.

Instead of shying away from Verbal section difficulties, I have decided to work on my weakness. I aim to score 45 in my verbal section, a Herculean task, but I feel it can be done if I do my things right. I am planning to take GMAT after a year. So I thought I will take first 2-3 months(2-3 hours a day) to develop reading habit and learn the basics so that I can start building on them once I actually start my GMAT prep. ( I didn’t want to jump right into GMAT prep, as I feel overwhelmed when I try to answer Verbal question because I barely know any concepts and I might even give up if I see my results are discouraging, which is not what I want).

I have started reading Economist and NGC magazines to accustom myself with lengthy passages and articles. If the topic of the article is familiar, I understand the gist of it even when I don’t understand few sentences because of their construction or because of some new words used. As GMAT is not kind enough to give familiar topics on the test, I have to start understanding the sentence formations better.

Below are few sentences I found in the articles I read and they have different constructions

1. While Vox’s leader, Santiago Abascal, criticises illegal immigration, his main pitch is to recentralise government, ban separatist parties and crack down on the Catalan regional administration.

2. SoftBank controls important companies, including Sprint, an American telecoms outfit, and Arm, a British tech firm that is a vital cog in the semiconductor industry.

3. MagicLab’s owner, Andrey Andreev, a Russian billionaire, has faced criticism for presiding over an allegedly sexist culture.

4. From 2001 to 2016, researchers caught ice seals, fur seals, Steller sea lions and northern sea otters from around the Bering Strait, and tested them for PDV, which affects the lungs and brain.

5. Its funding ratio of 40.7% is one of the worst in America, according to the Centre for Retirement Research (crr) in Boston.

6. The situation is getting worse. In 2009 the schemes’ actuaries requested $2.1bn, but only $1.6bn was paid.

7. By 2018 the state paid in $4.2bn, still well short of the $7.1bn the actuaries asked for.

8. Offering workers a defined-benefit pension, where an income based on final salary is paid for the rest of their lives, is an expensive proposition, especially as life expectancies lengthen.

9. Pension shortfalls are common across America, with the average public scheme monitored by the crr just 72.4% funded.

10. In parts of Africa, the benefits of circumcising adolescents can outweigh the costs by about 10 to 1, according to the Copenhagen Consensus Centre (ccc), a think-tank.

11. The narrow ridge, the site of early Jerusalem and today packed with houses occupied mostly by Palestinian residents, conceals a subterranean labyrinth of natural caves, Canaanite water channels, Judaean tunnels, and Roman quarries.

I understood these sentences. However, not always I understand which clause refers to which part of the sentence. Because I’m losing confidence, I am trying too much to understand what I read, which sometimes even causing confusions with list of items separated by , in a sentence with clauses separated by ,.

How can I get better at understanding the sentences when they are too long? Is there a way to understand which clauses refer to which subject/object etc?

Please excuse the lengthy post and the mistakes in it.

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 22 Feb 2018
Posts: 344
CAT Tests
Re: A noob trying to master verbal  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Nov 2019, 01:41
Hi, sundeep535,

It's good that you identified your weak section and started reading magazines. Such reading will improve your both RC and SC capabilities. However, it seems that you might need to refresh your basics and i would suggest to refer Manhattan SC guide. Once, you go through the guide, you can enroll for free trials of test prep companies, having good reviews, to ace GMAT verbal.

Thanks,
Raxit T.
_________________
Thanks in the forum can be expressed by hitting KUDOS!!!
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
V
Joined: 18 Aug 2017
Posts: 5473
Location: India
Concentration: Sustainability, Marketing
GPA: 4
WE: Marketing (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: A noob trying to master verbal  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Nov 2019, 02:59
sundeep535
well you can surely give a try on reading manhattan verbal books as they are really good especially for SC..

sundeep535 wrote:
Hi,

I am a non-native speaker and I scored 17 on my GMAT verbal section, which shows how weak I’m at it. Honestly speaking, i didn’t prepare for verbal section because I wasn’t even good at the basics. I spent 2 hours a day on quant concepts for a week and scored 49. I didnt like Math either in my childhood, but worked on it and now I love Math. That’s is what I want to do with my Verbal section.

Instead of shying away from Verbal section difficulties, I have decided to work on my weakness. I aim to score 45 in my verbal section, a Herculean task, but I feel it can be done if I do my things right. I am planning to take GMAT after a year. So I thought I will take first 2-3 months(2-3 hours a day) to develop reading habit and learn the basics so that I can start building on them once I actually start my GMAT prep. ( I didn’t want to jump right into GMAT prep, as I feel overwhelmed when I try to answer Verbal question because I barely know any concepts and I might even give up if I see my results are discouraging, which is not what I want).

I have started reading Economist and NGC magazines to accustom myself with lengthy passages and articles. If the topic of the article is familiar, I understand the gist of it even when I don’t understand few sentences because of their construction or because of some new words used. As GMAT is not kind enough to give familiar topics on the test, I have to start understanding the sentence formations better.

Below are few sentences I found in the articles I read and they have different constructions

1. While Vox’s leader, Santiago Abascal, criticises illegal immigration, his main pitch is to recentralise government, ban separatist parties and crack down on the Catalan regional administration.

2. SoftBank controls important companies, including Sprint, an American telecoms outfit, and Arm, a British tech firm that is a vital cog in the semiconductor industry.

3. MagicLab’s owner, Andrey Andreev, a Russian billionaire, has faced criticism for presiding over an allegedly sexist culture.

4. From 2001 to 2016, researchers caught ice seals, fur seals, Steller sea lions and northern sea otters from around the Bering Strait, and tested them for PDV, which affects the lungs and brain.

5. Its funding ratio of 40.7% is one of the worst in America, according to the Centre for Retirement Research (crr) in Boston.

6. The situation is getting worse. In 2009 the schemes’ actuaries requested $2.1bn, but only $1.6bn was paid.

7. By 2018 the state paid in $4.2bn, still well short of the $7.1bn the actuaries asked for.

8. Offering workers a defined-benefit pension, where an income based on final salary is paid for the rest of their lives, is an expensive proposition, especially as life expectancies lengthen.

9. Pension shortfalls are common across America, with the average public scheme monitored by the crr just 72.4% funded.

10. In parts of Africa, the benefits of circumcising adolescents can outweigh the costs by about 10 to 1, according to the Copenhagen Consensus Centre (ccc), a think-tank.

11. The narrow ridge, the site of early Jerusalem and today packed with houses occupied mostly by Palestinian residents, conceals a subterranean labyrinth of natural caves, Canaanite water channels, Judaean tunnels, and Roman quarries.

I understood these sentences. However, not always I understand which clause refers to which part of the sentence. Because I’m losing confidence, I am trying too much to understand what I read, which sometimes even causing confusions with list of items separated by , in a sentence with clauses separated by ,.

How can I get better at understanding the sentences when they are too long? Is there a way to understand which clauses refer to which subject/object etc?

Please excuse the lengthy post and the mistakes in it.

Posted from my mobile device
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Status: So far only Dreams i have!!
Joined: 05 Jan 2015
Posts: 139
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: A noob trying to master verbal  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Nov 2019, 23:14
Hi sundeep535

You can keep a daily routine of reading quality editorials/books for at least 30 mins, it will add a great value to your paragraph reading and understanding skills and help you in RC and SC. Start focusing on basics by following Manhattan books. Also, Oxford books can be considered for concepts understanding. All the best for you prep.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: A noob trying to master verbal   [#permalink] 21 Nov 2019, 23:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A noob trying to master verbal

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne