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Re: Australians often debate whether kangaroo, the only large animal that [#permalink]
TestPrepUnlimited wrote:
rheam25 wrote:
Australians often debate whether kangaroo, the only large animal that hops, is a pest to be eradicated, given that kangaroos are twice as much as humans in Australia, or a resource to be exploited for its low-fat, high-protein meat or its leather to make athletic gear or a beloved national animal to be conserved.

(A) kangaroos are twice as much as humans in Australia
(B) in Australia there are twice as many kangaroos as there are humans
(C) kangaroos are twice as many in Australia as humans
(D) there are two times kangaroos in Australia as humans
(E) in Australia, kangaroos are twice of humans


Correct answer: B

The incorrect answer choices in this question make illogical comparisons between kangaroos and humans.

(A): Incorrect. "Twice as much" does not indicate the number of kangaroos; it does not say what they are "twice as much" of. Therefore they cannot be compared in this way to humans. The sentence could be corrected to read "kangaroos are twice as much of the population as humans are ..."
(B): Correct. The number of kangaroos ("twice as many") is compared directly to humans "as there are [many] humans."
(C): Incorrect. (C) compares how many kangaroos there are directly to humans, not how many humans there are.
(D): Incorrect. Similarly to (A), (D) does not specify how kangaroos are "two times ... as humans." (D) could be rewritten to say, "there are two times as many kangaroos in Australia as there are humans."
(E): Incorrect. Like (A) and (D), "twice of humans" is an improper comparison between the numbers of kangaroos and humans.


Thanks for the wonderful explanation. Just a quick question
Isn't as much expression(uncountable) impossible to use with a countable noun like kangaroos? If so, can you please throw some light on how ttwice as much of the population as humans are makes sense?
Would love to hear your expert comment on this. Thx
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Re: Australians often debate whether kangaroo, the only large animal that [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Jainam24 wrote:
TestPrepUnlimited wrote:
rheam25 wrote:
Australians often debate whether kangaroo, the only large animal that hops, is a pest to be eradicated, given that kangaroos are twice as much as humans in Australia, or a resource to be exploited for its low-fat, high-protein meat or its leather to make athletic gear or a beloved national animal to be conserved.

(A) kangaroos are twice as much as humans in Australia
(B) in Australia there are twice as many kangaroos as there are humans
(C) kangaroos are twice as many in Australia as humans
(D) there are two times kangaroos in Australia as humans
(E) in Australia, kangaroos are twice of humans


Correct answer: B

The incorrect answer choices in this question make illogical comparisons between kangaroos and humans.

(A): Incorrect. "Twice as much" does not indicate the number of kangaroos; it does not say what they are "twice as much" of. Therefore they cannot be compared in this way to humans. The sentence could be corrected to read "kangaroos are twice as much of the population as humans are ..."
(B): Correct. The number of kangaroos ("twice as many") is compared directly to humans "as there are [many] humans."
(C): Incorrect. (C) compares how many kangaroos there are directly to humans, not how many humans there are.
(D): Incorrect. Similarly to (A), (D) does not specify how kangaroos are "two times ... as humans." (D) could be rewritten to say, "there are two times as many kangaroos in Australia as there are humans."
(E): Incorrect. Like (A) and (D), "twice of humans" is an improper comparison between the numbers of kangaroos and humans.


Thanks for the wonderful explanation. Just a quick question
Isn't as much expression(uncountable) impossible to use with a countable noun like kangaroos? If so, can you please throw some light on how ttwice as much of the population as humans are makes sense?
Would love to hear your expert comment on this. Thx


Hello Jainam24,

We hope this finds you well.

There appears to have been a bit of confusion; the correct answer choice - B - uses the appropriate phrase "as many" to refer to the countable noun "kangaroos".

We hope this helps.
All the best!
Experts' Global Team
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Australians often debate whether kangaroo, the only large animal that [#permalink]
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