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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
broall wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.

Source: LSAT



Hello, Pls help me. I have solved many LSAT questions. I have found that LSAT questions are written in a much different way than GMAT questions. Do you think such LSAT questions will have a good chance to appear in the real test?
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
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chesstitans wrote:
Hello, Pls help me. I have solved many LSAT questions. I have found that LSAT questions are written in a much different way than GMAT questions. Do you think such LSAT questions will have a good chance to appear in the real test?


Unfortunately, logic in LSAT is slightly different from logic in GMAT (logic in LSAT is strict, but logic in GMAT is flexible). I don't think that any question in real GMAT test has the same logic as in LSAT test.

However, you could improve your CR skill by solving LSAT questions. There is no golden key that can open any door, a strategy could work with someone, but won't work with others. You have to find your own way to study GMAT effectively.
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach. -Correct.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high. -income?

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them. -This statement states that funds available > costs - opposite of what us stated in the passage

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive. -standards of medical care

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies. -out of scope
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
gmatexam439 wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach. -Correct.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high. -income?

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them. -This statement states that funds available > costs - opposite of what us stated in the passage

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive. -standards of medical care

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies. -out of scope


Hi,
How do u infer A? nowhere its mentioned in the premise that healthcare costs could be shrinked?
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
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sunny91 wrote:
gmatexam439 wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach. -Correct.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high. -income?

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them. -This statement states that funds available > costs - opposite of what us stated in the passage

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive. -standards of medical care

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies. -out of scope


Hi,
How do u infer A? nowhere its mentioned in the premise that healthcare costs could be shrinked?


Hello sunny91,

This is inference type question.

Premise 1:
system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere

Premise 2:
For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

Conclusion:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs.

As we see, the argument is about cost cutting and the argument states that "under current conditions we can't reduce costs". So we can infer that if at all any cost cutting can be done-since it can't be done in present scenario- we need something that will take into account all the plays/tricks that insurers/hospitals can play on patients.

Neverthless, all other options are out of scope.

1 suggestion: We are always looking for 4 wrong options than a correct one.

Hope that helps !!
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
broall : Dear, it would be much obliged if you can clarify me on this issue.
It's been one more week to go till my Gmat exam day and I run out of CR sources to practice (I have done all official guide cr on gmatclub and other apps alr) then I bumped into your LSAT source and found it super helpful to practice. However, compared with Gmat CR, most of Lsat question even the 95% difficulty ones I can do it pretty well since I found the Lsat logic is much more straightforward and easy to infer rather than Gmat cr.
What struck me is that should I continue practice lsat questions till exam day or should i just stick to Gmat cr questions to get acquainted with Gmat logic instead :( Thank you so much in advance!
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
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lichting wrote:
broall : Dear, it would be much obliged if you can clarify me on this issue.
It's been one more week to go till my Gmat exam day and I run out of CR sources to practice (I have done all official guide cr on gmatclub and other apps alr) then I bumped into your LSAT source and found it super helpful to practice. However, compared with Gmat CR, most of Lsat question even the 95% difficulty ones I can do it pretty well since I found the Lsat logic is much more straightforward and easy to infer rather than Gmat cr.
What struck me is that should I continue practice lsat questions till exam day or should i just stick to Gmat cr questions to get acquainted with Gmat logic instead :( Thank you so much in advance!


I think that you should stop practice LSAT questions and go back to GMAT like questions since you dont have much time now.

Practicing LSAT is for long run, not short run. If you have a short period of time to study, it's better to focus on GMAT materials only. Take some tests on GMATPrep to estimate your score and get ready to the test.
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach. Correct as this option is talking about the cost cutting and another approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high - income of Heath.... we are not concerned with this.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them....opposite of what is mentioned in passage.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive. ... it is giving an additional information to support that cost is increasing but not mentioning how can we cut cost.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.....here the person is judging the argument... because wheather it would be wise or unwise that depends on situation.

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach. - hold

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high. Irrelevant

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them. - weakens the argument

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive. - Irrelevant

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies. - Irrelevant

We need answer that will prove that cost cuttings in one area will lead to a bulge in the other. A is the closest and also by POE you arrive at A.

Kudos if you like the post.
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
A is correct because the prompt says a piecemeal approach won’t work. This suggests it’s opposite, a comprehensive approach, is needed.

C is wrong because there isn’t anything that suggests costs are growing because of new funding. This new funding is never alluded to anywhere.

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
What is a "comprehensive approach"? That is as vague as they come.
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs canno [#permalink]
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