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Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early

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Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Sep 2018, 02:58
4
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A
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  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

55% (01:11) correct 45% (01:09) wrong based on 824 sessions

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Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually undermine it, ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance.

(A) would gradually undermine it
(B) to be a gradual undermining of it
(C) would be a gradual undermining of ethnicity
(D) to gradually undermine ethnicity
(E) gradually undermining it

Source: GMAC Paper Test, Test Code #55, Section 6, Question 8

Since verb prediected has appeared it should complement with would verb? Is this correct?

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/11/10/books/ties-of-blood-rivers-of-blood.html

CONTRARY to the popular and scholarly wisdom of the 1950's and early 60's that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually undermine ethnicity, we have come to realize that what appear to be religious, linguistic and cultural conflicts can be usefully and meaningfully analyzed as ethnic in nature, and that ethnicity is a world-wide phenomenon of continuing, even increasing importance.

Originally posted by udaymathapati on 20 Apr 2011, 00:16.
Last edited by hazelnut on 11 Sep 2018, 02:58, edited 5 times in total.
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2011, 08:16
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+1 A

In this sentence , “predicted” works as a reporting verb. When you report something that someone said, you have to modify the verbs used by that person.
In this case, “will” must be modified. Now, it is “would”.
Maybe, you will say "where is the word "will" in the sentence?" Remember that the sentence mentioned a prediction; therefore, someone in the past said "will" in that prediction.

Take a look to the reporting speech rules.

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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2016, 07:32
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The sentence structure of the prompt is a little odd here idiomatically. We always say X reported Y to do z or x reported that Y would do Z. it is odd to say that X reported Y would do Z. When we do not use the connector ‘that’ then we can use the infinitive, On the contrary, if we want to take the relative clause route, then the connector 'that' and a verb are necessary. A seems to be a hybrid, which does seem to fit in. D looks less objectionable, IMO
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Mar 2016, 03:47
udaymathapati wrote:
Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually under mine it, ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance.

(A) would gradually undermine it
(B) to be a gradual undermining of it
(C) would be a gradual undermining of ethnicity
(D) to gradually undermine ethnicity
(E) gradually undermining it

Since verb prediected has appeared it should complement with would verb? Is this correct?


in A, the OA, "it" pronoun appear before it noun. this case is called forward reference to differentiate with bacward case, in which noun appears before pronoun.
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Mar 2016, 07:51
daagh wrote:
The sentence structure of the prompt is a little odd here idiomatically. We always say X reported Y to do z or x reported that Y would do Z. it is odd to say that X reported Y would do Z. When we do not use the connector ‘that’ then we can use the infinitive, On the contrary, if we want to take the relative clause route, then the connector 'that' and a verb are necessary. A seems to be a hybrid, which does seem to fit in. D looks less objectionable, IMO

Is it possible that the sentence just "assumes" a "that"? Can this be expected on GMAT?
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2016, 05:10
Excuse me, but I have to firmly disagree with this sentence as a whole, including the answer choices.

Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually under mine it, ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance

"it" here clearly refers to ethnicity and it doesn't make sense, therefore it's incorrect. All the answer choices either repeat the same ambigous use of "it" or create redundancy by using "ethnicity" twice ,so to be correct the sentence would have to be rewritten in some other way.

Of course you can say that the only way for this sentence to make sense, given the answer choices provided, is to assume that "it" refers to the following "ethnicity" but come on, in this case the SC becomes subjective to one's interpretation of the meaning, following this logic you can discuss the meaning of virtually any SC question. There have to be objective reasons to consider a choice correct.

Here, the way I see it, the question given is not written in a good way to test SC skills and creates the "wrong" type of difficulty. Instead of testing objective knowledge it tests subjective interpretation of the meaning.

What you guys think? I am I missing some exotic rule here? For a 600+ question there shouldn't be any though.
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2016, 12:14
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iliavko wrote:
Excuse me, but I have to firmly disagree with this sentence as a whole, including the answer choices.

Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually under mine it, ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance

"it" here clearly refers to ethnicity and it doesn't make sense, therefore it's incorrect. All the answer choices either repeat the same ambigous use of "it" or create redundancy by using "ethnicity" twice ,so to be correct the sentence would have to be rewritten in some other way.

Of course you can say that the only way for this sentence to make sense, given the answer choices provided, is to assume that "it" refers to the following "ethnicity" but come on, in this case the SC becomes subjective to one's interpretation of the meaning, following this logic you can discuss the meaning of virtually any SC question. There have to be objective reasons to consider a choice correct.

Here, the way I see it, the question given is not written in a good way to test SC skills and creates the "wrong" type of difficulty. Instead of testing objective knowledge it tests subjective interpretation of the meaning.

What you guys think? I am I missing some exotic rule here? For a 600+ question there shouldn't be any though.


Yes, even in the correct option A, the use of "it" is questionable. Moreover "that" is missing after "predicted".
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2016, 07:49
agree with the above comments.
D seems to be better.
1st thing that I noticed reported X would Y..nope
2nd - it is ambiguous..
D seems to clear the confusion

stay away from such questions, as such are not good for practice!
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 16:22
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I solved this SC by moving phrases around:

Ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually undermine it.

(A) would gradually undermine it --> CORRECT. By moving phrases around, we can see that there's no ambiguity and sentence makes sense as it currently stands.
(B) to be a gradual undermining of it
(C) would be a gradual undermining of ethnicity
(D) to gradually undermine ethnicity
(E) gradually undermining it
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 03:09
law258 wrote:
I solved this SC by moving phrases around:

Ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually undermine it.

(A) would gradually undermine it --> CORRECT. By moving phrases around, we can see that there's no ambiguity and sentence makes sense as it currently stands.
(B) to be a gradual undermining of it
(C) would be a gradual undermining of ethnicity
(D) to gradually undermine ethnicity
(E) gradually undermining it



If option A is correct, then how can we have a verb "would" ? Because having would in the sentence makes the first part an IC. sentence after following comma is also an IC. Both sentences are not connected by an IC connector.

Am i correct in my analysis ?
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 05:58
daagh wrote:
The sentence structure of the prompt is a little odd here idiomatically. We always say X reported Y to do z or x reported that Y would do Z. it is odd to say that X reported Y would do Z. When we do not use the connector ‘that’ then we can use the infinitive, On the contrary, if we want to take the relative clause route, then the connector 'that' and a verb are necessary. A seems to be a hybrid, which does seem to fit in. D looks less objectionable, IMO


Hi Sir
Could you please ellaborate on this question..
i did not understand the structure
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 06:02
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daagh wrote:
The sentence structure of the prompt is a little odd here idiomatically. We always say X reported Y to do z or x reported that Y would do Z. it is odd to say that X reported Y would do Z. When we do not use the connector ‘that’ then we can use the infinitive, On the contrary, if we want to take the relative clause route, then the connector 'that' and a verb are necessary. A seems to be a hybrid, which does seem to fit in. D looks less objectionable, IMO


@DAAGH---Sir could you please explain the sentence and the approach to deal with this..
Thank you
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2018, 14:42
"undermining" should never be a good answer.
D does not have a good grammar structure either.
"it" is acceptable b/c "it" refers to "ethnicity"
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2018, 21:41
Hi abhimahna,

Can you please explain this question. I am skeptical about the option A, especially on the pronoun "It" . Hence, Basing it on the split i chose D over A. Moreover, Between 'X predicted Y to do Z' and 'X predicted Y would do Z' we chose later over the former.

Thank you
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2018, 05:21
Nightmare007 wrote:
Hi abhimahna,

Can you please explain this question. I am skeptical about the option A, especially on the pronoun "It" . Hence, Basing it on the split i chose D over A. Moreover, Between 'X predicted Y to do Z' and 'X predicted Y would do Z' we chose later over the former.

Thank you


Hey Nightmare007 ,

I am happy to help :-)

Let's understand the question first:

Author said - Scholarly wisdom predicted X would undermine Z but in reality Z is a worldwide phenomenon.

"It" in option A is referring to Ethnicity and it is perfectly fine.

Please note that meaning of the sentence should be given more importance over deciding whether the pronoun has been used correctly.

Now the right construction should be "They predicted + Clause".But the same has not been the case in choice D. D is They predicted + No Clause. This is an incorrect construction.

Does that make sense?
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2018, 05:24
Hi abhimahna, daagh,
I am a bit skeptical about the answer.
which one is right
Scholarly Wisdom that Predicted that the processes of <something> would (verb) undermine it. (It refering to ethinicity or wisdom?)
OR
Scholarly Wisdom that Predicted the processes to undermine enthinicity (clear on what it is undermining)

I chose the later one over former one.
Can you please tell me why 2nd sentence is wrong and 1st one is right.?
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Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2018, 07:39
leeye84 wrote:
962. Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950’s and early 1960’s that predicted the processes of modernization and rationalization would gradually undermine it, ethnicity is a worldwide phenomenon of increasing importance.

(A) would gradually undermine it
(B) to be a gradual undermining of it
(C) would be a gradual undermining of ethnicity
(D) to gradually undermine ethnicity
(E) gradually undermining it



Please someone explain why is E wrong.
Re: Contrary to the scholarly wisdom of the 1950s and early &nbs [#permalink] 02 Jul 2018, 07:39
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