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CR -- iris scanner

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Joined: 17 Sep 2016
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Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

CR -- iris scanner [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 22:49
A technology company plans to develop a prototype laptop that uses iris scanners that can distinguish one user from another. The inventor of this laptop claims that it will reduce insurance and security costs at offices, as only authorized users will be able to turn on the laptop, making it a less appealing target for thieves.

Which of the following, if true, most supports the company's implementing its plan to develop the prototype?

A) There is considerable variation in the color and patterns present in most people's irises.

B) The size of people's irises tends to change noticeably over the course of the day.

C) In-person security services will not suffer from technological glitches when allowing access to laptops.

D) Colored contacts allow people to change their eye color, without altering any of the other characteristics of their iris.

E) Insurance and security companies provide other services to companies in addition to protecting laptops.

dear Magoosh experts,
I am sunk in A ,C and D. genuinely want your help to point out my fault

here is my reasoning..
at the beginning of the argument, a technology company PLANS to .... the conclusion mentioned the advantage of the plan, then, the stem is need one which is most help support the implement.

so I view it as a evaluation PLAN.

I analyzed plan questions and found that it can be approached from 3 aspects to assess, viability/necessary , operation/process, effect/aim/goal.

next step, I need one that can state the advantage of the plan as 3 aspects above.

A) There is considerable variation in the color and patterns present in most people's irises
A states the character of the technology that can identify different individual.
I view A as a viability, -- credit one

C) In-person security services will not suffer from technological glitches when allowing access to laptops
C numerates an security -- in person security-- which eliminates people's panic,
C implies the tech provides an security that users can use it safely.
I vies C as an effect -- credit one

D) Colored contacts allow people to change their eye color, without altering any of the other characteristics of their iris.
yes, in real life, people will change eye color through lenses,
D implies the technology can tolerant the variation in life,
D states a advantage of the technology
so I view it as an effect -- credit one

based on the reasoning, 3 options are credit, I think I certainly missed something that leads me to a dilemma.
I desire an approach to break the dilemma.
call your help... :? :? :?

thanks a lot
have a nice weekends.

>_~

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

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Re: CR -- iris scanner [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 23:38
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Re: CR -- iris scanner [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 10:47
zoezhuyan wrote:
A technology company plans to develop a prototype laptop that uses iris scanners that can distinguish one user from another. The inventor of this laptop claims that it will reduce insurance and security costs at offices, as only authorized users will be able to turn on the laptop, making it a less appealing target for thieves.

Which of the following, if true, most supports the company's implementing its plan to develop the prototype?

A) There is considerable variation in the color and patterns present in most people's irises.

B) The size of people's irises tends to change noticeably over the course of the day.

C) In-person security services will not suffer from technological glitches when allowing access to laptops.

D) Colored contacts allow people to change their eye color, without altering any of the other characteristics of their iris.

E) Insurance and security companies provide other services to companies in addition to protecting laptops.

dear Magoosh experts,
I am sunk in A ,C and D. genuinely want your help to point out my fault

here is my reasoning..
at the beginning of the argument, a technology company PLANS to .... the conclusion mentioned the advantage of the plan, then, the stem is need one which is most help support the implement.

so I view it as a evaluation PLAN.

I analyzed plan questions and found that it can be approached from 3 aspects to assess, viability/necessary , operation/process, effect/aim/goal.

next step, I need one that can state the advantage of the plan as 3 aspects above.

A) There is considerable variation in the color and patterns present in most people's irises
A states the character of the technology that can identify different individual.
I view A as a viability, -- credit one

C) In-person security services will not suffer from technological glitches when allowing access to laptops
C numerates an security -- in person security-- which eliminates people's panic,
C implies the tech provides an security that users can use it safely.
I vies C as an effect -- credit one

D) Colored contacts allow people to change their eye color, without altering any of the other characteristics of their iris.
yes, in real life, people will change eye color through lenses,
D implies the technology can tolerant the variation in life,
D states a advantage of the technology
so I view it as an effect -- credit one

based on the reasoning, 3 options are credit, I think I certainly missed something that leads me to a dilemma.
I desire an approach to break the dilemma.
call your help... :? :? :?

thanks a lot
have a nice weekends.

>_~

Dear zoezhuyan,

I'm happy to respond. :-) I hope you are well, my friend. :-)

You are probably familiar with Negation Test for CR Assumption arguments. Well, the Negation Test is more widely applicable. Think about it. Suppose I say that Statement X provides support for some argument: well if someone else comes along and points out that Statement X could be 100% false and the argument would still work, then the argument really didn't need the support it was getting from Statement X! Something is a not very important support if it can be false and the argument still can work!

One way to approach (A), (C), and (D) in this question is to negate each.

What if (A) is false? The "the color and patterns present in most people's irises" is mostly the same, and neither people nor computers can tell the difference. If this is true, the entire plan is a waste of money! There would be absolutely no sense in creating identity protection software based on people's irises if the irises of different people were indistinguishable. Negating this obliterates the argument.

What is (C) is false? Suppose there are "technological glitches when allowing access to laptops." Well, what else is new? What program or security service that we use now does not suffer from glitches? If the glitches were so severe that nobody could use the service, that would be a big problem, but if there were simply some glitches, typically of all the other programs we use, the company could still move forward and make a profit. If this statement were false, it may present some difficulties, but it would not destroy the argument.

What if (D) is false? Suppose "colored contacts" radically alter the "characteristics of their iris." Well, first of all, among all computer users, the percent of folks with colored contacts is probably small, so perhaps it would not impact the market that much. Also, suppose someone is wearing some kind of contact that completely alters the appearance of their iris: if that person wanted to use this service, all he would have to do is pop the contact out, have the computer scan his naked iris, and then put the contact back in. That would be a mild inconvenience, but it wouldn't prevent someone from using this security system. If this statement were false, it may present some difficulties, but it would not destroy the argument.

By negating, we can more easily see what is essential. (C) & (D) are helpful, but not essential, whereas (A) is absolutely essential: if (A) is false, then the entire project is a no-go.

Does all this make sense?

I hope you are very well, my friend. Have a wonderful day. :-)

Mike McGarry :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Kudos [?]: 8790 [0], given: 106

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Re: CR -- iris scanner [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 19:59
mikemcgarry wrote:

Dear zoezhuyan,

I'm happy to respond. :-) I hope you are well, my friend. :-)

You are probably familiar with Negation Test for CR Assumption arguments. Well, the Negation Test is more widely applicable. Think about it. Suppose I say that Statement X provides support for some argument: well if someone else comes along and points out that Statement X could be 100% false and the argument would still work, then the argument really didn't need the support it was getting from Statement X! Something is a not very important support if it can be false and the argument still can work!

One way to approach (A), (C), and (D) in this question is to negate each.

What if (A) is false? The "the color and patterns present in most people's irises" is mostly the same, and neither people nor computers can tell the difference. If this is true, the entire plan is a waste of money! There would be absolutely no sense in creating identity protection software based on people's irises if the irises of different people were indistinguishable. Negating this obliterates the argument.

What is (C) is false? Suppose there are "technological glitches when allowing access to laptops." Well, what else is new? What program or security service that we use now does not suffer from glitches? If the glitches were so severe that nobody could use the service, that would be a big problem, but if there were simply some glitches, typically of all the other programs we use, the company could still move forward and make a profit. If this statement were false, it may present some difficulties, but it would not destroy the argument.

What if (D) is false? Suppose "colored contacts" radically alter the "characteristics of their iris." Well, first of all, among all computer users, the percent of folks with colored contacts is probably small, so perhaps it would not impact the market that much. Also, suppose someone is wearing some kind of contact that completely alters the appearance of their iris: if that person wanted to use this service, all he would have to do is pop the contact out, have the computer scan his naked iris, and then put the contact back in. That would be a mild inconvenience, but it wouldn't prevent someone from using this security system. If this statement were false, it may present some difficulties, but it would not destroy the argument.

By negating, we can more easily see what is essential. (C) & (D) are helpful, but not essential, whereas (A) is absolutely essential: if (A) is false, then the entire project is a no-go.

Does all this make sense?

I hope you are very well, my friend. Have a wonderful day. :-)

Mike McGarry :-)


thanks so much , Mike.

before reading this explanation, I have not realized Negation skill that can be used so widely.
I had a new interpretation about Negation...
this interpretation reminiscent "toucan beak", a CR weaken question from Magoosh,
the last choice of toucan beak , similar holes in different trees, is eliminated by Negation skill.

back to this case, I figured out efficient approach definitely save time,. obviously, the Plan way is not efficient for this case, leaving 3 options and involving one more negation skill to eliminate.
hoping I can grasp a "efficient approach" or pattern, which can make up the time consumption of reading question.

thanks Mike.

have a nice day.
>_~

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

Re: CR -- iris scanner   [#permalink] 01 Nov 2016, 19:59
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