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Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs

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Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2017, 14:08
Recently, news broke that Dawna Clarke, former director of admissions at both the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia, has joined mbaMission’s team of elite admissions consulting professionals.

Now, we are proud to announce that Dawna will host her first exclusive event—a live online Q&A session, “Insights into the MBA Admissions Process,” on Wednesday, June 28 at 9 p.m. EDT.

For almost two decades, Dawna served as the director of admissions at two of the country’s leading MBA programs, interviewing thousands of candidates, reviewing tens of thousands of essays and recommendations, and acting as the final decision-maker on more than 60,000 MBA applications. Now, as mbaMission’s Chief MBA Strategist and a Senior Consultant, she is ready to tap into what she has learned from her many years of experience to help aspiring MBAs with their admissions-related questions.*

During this Q&A session, you will have the opportunity to directly ask Dawna any questions you may have about the process—including which exam to take, in which round to apply, and how to overcome a low GPA or GMAT score—and benefit from her firsthand insight into the admissions world so you can begin the process of submitting your best application.

We hope that you will join us for this valuable event that will be essential to your b-school planning. Space is limited! To enroll for free, click here.

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Re: Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 11:03
ImageThe Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has a small student body and a rural location, combined with world-class faculty and academic focus. As you approach your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application it will be important to consistently show how you will fit into the school values of leadership, teamwork and collaboration and how you plan to bring your own unique qualities and experiences to the community.

Tuck’s advice to applicants on the new essays includes: “Remember, the essays are an opportunity to share with us who you are beyond the numbers and resume, so reflect, take your time, and be genuine. Communicate clearly and in your voice, not who you think we want you to be; and most importantly, answer the question you are asked.”

Tuck adds this note on word counts: “All noted word counts are meant as a guideline—we won’t be counting, but do have great sense of what 500 words looks like.”

Stacy Blackman Consulting can help you put together a successful Tuck application, contact us to learn more about the customized assistance we can provide for you.

Essay One (Required):

What are your short and long-term goals? Why is an MBA a critical next step toward achieving those goals? Why are you interested in Tuck specifically? (500 words)?

Consistent with a standard MBA career goals essay Tuck asks you to outline your short- and long-term career goals. Your short-term goals are the aspirations you have for your job immediately after graduation, while your long-term goals may be 10 or 20 years after you complete your MBA.

The second part of this essay question focuses on “Why MBA.” This is an important question whether you are in a career that typically requires an MBA, or a career that does not. Tuck is not looking for candidates who just need to check the box on an MBA, but rather candidates who will use the experience of a top-tier MBA program to accelerate their careers. If you are going into a career that is not typically an MBA feeder, think about the skills an MBA will provide and how you will use them to create excellence as a manager or executive in your target industry.

“Why Tuck” is another crucial element to this essay. Make sure you have researched the school’s programs and determined how your education will help you achieve your goals. For example, Tuck has multiple global business programs, including a class where you can consult to an international company and short Global Insight Expeditions. By reaching out to current students and alumni you can learn more about the experiences and classes that would inform your development as a global leader.

Essay Two (Required):
Tuck’s mission is to educate wise leaders to better the world of business. Wisdom encompasses the essential aptitudes of confident humility, about what one does and does not know; empathy, towards the diverse ideas and experiences of others; and judgment, about when and how to take risks for the better.
With Tuck’s mission in mind, and with a focus on confident humility, tell us about a time you:
• received tough feedback,
• experienced failure, or
• disappointed yourself or others.
How did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result? (500 words)


Wisdom is an important value to Tuck and one that is rarely discussed in MBA programs. All MBA programs look for maturity and judgment from candidates, and the quality of wisdom is similar. It’s interesting to review the specifics of wisdom that Tuck outlines: humility, empathy, and judgment.

A compelling narrative will demonstrate how you have developed those qualities through interacting with others, specifically in the examples suggested (tough feedback, failure, or disappointment). Think about a time when you were truly challenged and how you resolved the experience. Did you learn humility and the desire to learn, along with empathy for others’ viewpoint? Then, did you learn how to apply your judgment fairly?

Interacting with your Tuck classmates may challenge you in a similar way, and showing a growth mentality, along with the humility to know what you don’t know, is attractive to the admissions committee.

This essay is not only an opportunity to discuss your ability to learn from others, you can also show that you are a leader in the Tuck tradition. The Tuck School of Business definition of leadership is inherently collaborative. Team based experiences are preferable, and as you describe working with someone different from yourself you can likely work in a strong collaborative leadership example.

Essay Three (Optional):
Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere and may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

This is your opportunity to discuss any perceived weaknesses in your application such as low GPA or gaps in your work experience. When approaching a question of this nature, focus on explanations rather than excuses and explain what you have done since the event you are explaining to demonstrate your academic ability or management potential.

You could potentially use this space to add something new that was not covered in the previous essays or in the application, resume or recommendations, however use your judgment about the topics as Tuck asks that you only complete this question if you “feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.”

Essay Four (To be completed by all reapplicants):
How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally. (500 words)

If you are re-applying to Tuck this essay is the place for you to showcase any developments since your last application. Ideally you have concrete improvements like a stronger GMAT score, grades from business classes, or a promotion. Even if nothing quantitative has changed in your profile you likely have developed more leadership activities or progressed in your job responsibilities.

If you are struggling to think of any clear improvements you can describe refined goals or deeper thinking about your future that has led you to apply again to Tuck. Demonstrating growth in wisdom, humility or empathy can be a huge improvement to your application to Tuck and absolutely should be highlighted.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2017, 11:33
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This fall, the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth is bringing back an experiential learning exercise remembered by many alumni of yesteryear as their first chance to think like a senior-level business person.

Launched in 1974 by Tuck professor James Brian Quinn as Tycoon: The Tuck Management Game, this week-long exercise had students work in teams to simulate the process of acquiring and running a business in the clock-making industry.  At week’s end, teams were evaluated on metrics such as productivity, return on investment, and market penetration.

The game was phased-out in the early 2000s, but a reincarnated version of the course returns in November as TuckINTEL,  a customized experience delivered as a mini-course to second-year students.

INTEL stands for Integrative Experiential Learning, and the idea behind it is as straightforward as Quinn’s idea in Tycoon: to offer an experience that helps students integrate the key insights from the first-year core curriculum.

“TuckINTEL is Tycoon for the 21st century. In other words it is a souped-up version of Tycoon,” says Praveen Kopalle, associate dean of the MBA Program and Signal Companies’ Professor of Management and Professor of Marketing, in a university press release. “Tycoon was strategy-focused, while INTEL is much more directed, and a broader effort to integrate as much of our core curriculum as we can.”

Kopalle developed the course with Richard Sansing, associate dean for faculty and the Noble Foundation Professor of Accounting, and their first step was to interview all the faculty who teach core courses.

They compiled the most important lessons from the courses and then worked with Tuck alum John Thomas of the Regis Company to build a four-day, computer-aided exercise that incorporates key elements of finance, accounting, marketing, communications, statistics, economics, decision science, strategy and management, and operations.

Eventually, they chose urban wind power generation as the business industry and created a realistic case study that requires students to run a company that’s competing to bring the fictional Twists & Undulates Currents Kinetically (TUCK) NextGen Turbine (TNT) to market.

During the course, teams of four or five students run a company for an accelerated multi-year time frame. Each “year” constitutes a period of decision making about such areas as marketing and communication, strategic priorities, timely production, economic analysis, cash requirements and funding, presentations to the board, team excellence, and personal leadership impacts. Students evaluate relevant data and input their decisions into the Regis online platform by a given deadline.

The algorithm then computes the impacts of the decisions of each team and delivers results in the form of performance metrics. At the same time, Kopalle and Sansing, along with a few other core faculty, are monitoring team dynamics and discussions, answering questions, and debriefing with students about their results.

For student Ankitha Rajendra Kartha, who participated in the program’s May pilot, TuckINTEL provided a valuable reminder of what she had learned in her first year. It was also the first time she was asked to solve a complex business problem without a lot of specific guidance.

“We’ve looked at a lot of cases and been given perfect data in the core,” she says. “In this, we had to evaluate for ourselves and say, OK, maybe we should do a net-present-value, or maybe we should suggest a capital expenditure for the next year. I needed to figure out what concept to use, and how to use it.”

Like Tycoon, TuckINTEL is custom creation for Tuck students, and thus different from anything offered at other business schools. Kopalle explains why. “At Tuck, we have a unique combination of scale, focus, and community to pull this off,” he says.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2017, 14:25
Students in the Class of 2019 have embarked on the journey toward their MBAs at business schools across the country. Among the diverse classes at each school, we wondered how large, exactly, is the proportion of women?

We at mbaMission examined the latest class profiles of 16 top-ranked business schools to determine which programs welcomed the most women among this year’s incoming classes. Although no school has yet to break the 50% mark, some may be well on their way. Two programs—the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania—featured 44% women within the Class of 2019. The University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business and the Yale School of Management followed closely with 43% each, as did Harvard Business School, the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, all with 42%. The fact that nearly all schools reported figures above 30% is quite encouraging. It will be interesting to see which business school will be the first to reach the halfway mark—and when!

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Re: Expert advice for Tuck from Admissions Consultant blogs   [#permalink] 11 Dec 2017, 14:25
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