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  • MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews

     November 15, 2018

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    Learn the steps you need to take to ace your interviews and get accepted!
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Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs

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Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2017, 12:58
https://www.personalmbacoach.com/single-post/2017/06/22/Wharton-Application-Updates-LOR-Changes-Personal-MBA-Coach%E2%80%99s-Analysis

2017-2018 Deadlines

Round 1: September 19, 2017

Round 2: January 3, 2018

Round 3: March 27, 2018

Yesterday, at the 2017 AIGAC conference, Wharton shared details on the 2017-2018 application. While the essays will remain the same this year, Wharton announced a major change to its letters of recommendation process.

LOR Changes:

As Maryellen Reilly, Deputy Vice Dean, MBA Admissions, Financial Aid & Career Management recently shared in a gave candidates some specific advice: “By asking these two questions, our hope is to give applicants ample space to more fully explain their aspirations, goals, and how Wharton fits into those.  We want to be able to view applicants from both sides of their world – one where they are professionals developing skills and seeking career advancement, but also the personal growth side where they are seeking out enriching experiences to become better, stronger, wiser, and a more robust person. Take these two questions as an important opportunity to express who you are and what and who you want to be.  It is important for us to know the real you and be able to envision you as part of the Wharton community."

As a Wharton Graduate myself, I am intimately familiar with the MBA program and culture at Wharton and advise candidates to think about each question differently and ensure answers complement each other while showing readers multiple aspects of their candidacy.

Essay 1: What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

Personal MBA Coach's Take: With this first question, you should discuss your specific short-term goals, but also think broader. This question allows you to reflect at a higher level on your aspirations. Where do you see yourself in 10, 20 or even 30 years? How will you get there? It would also be reasonable, and expected, to touch upon your past successes, explaining how they are relevant to your future objectives. This question does not require you to walk through your entire resume, and candidates are advised not to do so. Instead, focus only on your past to establish what your key skills are how they will enable you to succeed in the future.

As you think about your future, think also about what your skills gaps are and how a Wharton MBA, specifically, will help you to close these gaps. It is important that you allow adequate time to research all that Wharton has to offer. I suggest being very specific in detailing what opportunities you plan to take advantage of on campus, what classes you plan to take, and how they will help you. Rather than including a laundry list, carefully think through how each area will help you fill in the necessary pieces of the puzzle and explain how you will improve. Be sure you show an understanding of Wharton’s culture here. Avoid vague statement and copy and pasting from other essays.

Essay 2: Teamwork is at the core of the Wharton MBA experience with each student contributing unique elements to our collaborative culture. How will you contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)

Personal MBA Coach's Take: Your answer to this second question should complement, but not repeat, your first essay. In order to demonstrate how you will be a team player, think about how you have been one in the past. Think about your personality and your specific strengths. Think about what you have to offer and how you have demonstrated team work throughout your past educational and professional career. Reflect on your specific contributions at work and in your communities. By including details on your past contributes, you will not only provide concrete evidence of what you can contribute to Wharton, but also show the reader more about you personally. Again, avoid vague statements and be specific. Wharton wants to learn what you will offer on campus and how you will uniquely contribute to the school’s culture.

If you would like individual and personal support while applying to Wharton, please find information about Personal MBA Coach’s comprehensive packages or contact me to discuss your profile as well as how I can help! As a Wharton graduate, I regularly help many applicants navigate Wharton’s application each year.  Email me at: scott@personalmbacoach.com or call +1 617-645-2424 today.

https://www.personalmbacoach.com/single-post/2017/06/22/Wharton-Application-Updates-LOR-Changes-Personal-MBA-Coach%E2%80%99s-Analysis
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New post 31 Jul 2017, 10:24
ImageThe Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania has kept this set of essays simple. Specific advice on essays from a student reminds applicants that “the Admissions Committee is looking to understand more about you and your unique personality and how that can ultimately contribute to the Wharton community. We are a student-driven campus and need each and every MBA to bring something to the table.”

As you consider how to approach this set of essays get to know the Wharton community. Some possible ways to connect include campus visits, online research and the many admissions events around the globe. Wharton has a specific culture, and fit with that culture is an important part of the admissions criteria.

Essay 1:
What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

This is both a standard career goals question and an inquiry into your personality and potential success in the program. Jordan Mock, WG’16 wrote a blog post with three excellent tips for this essay, in which he says, “Wharton is unique and your essay should reflect that.”

Be careful to answer the specific question in this career goals essay. Notice that you are not asked about your professional background or your key accomplishments outright. To answer the question asked, you will want to focus mainly on the future and what you are planning to pursue with your MBA degree. How will a Wharton MBA help you “connect the three career dots” that Jordan writes about?

To answer the question there is room to add color by using your background information where it is most relevant to your goals. Think about the key moments of your professional life that crystallized your goals for you, and focus on illuminating those decision points rather than reciting your entire resume. Anything unique in your background is always worth highlighting.

Understanding exactly how you fit in will help you describe what Wharton will do for you, as well as navigate interviews and other interactions with the Wharton admissions committee. Consider including specific information from your Wharton research in this essay such as Wharton faculty you would like to study with or unique educational opportunities at Wharton.

When you address your personal goals for the MBA make sure you are making the case for Wharton specifically. Consider what living in Philadelphia might be like, the many clubs and student activities, and leadership development opportunities like traveling to Antarctica with your classmates that may address some of your personal life goals.

Essay 2:
Teamwork is at the core of the Wharton MBA experience with each student contributing unique elements to our collaborative culture. How will you contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)

Wharton is an intense environment, but also one that takes pride in collaboration and community. This question seeks to understand how you work with others and what your leadership style is. Collaboration and teamwork are important key concepts to illustrate in this essay.

Your contribution to Wharton could be in the classroom, clubs or within small group projects. You might bring your experiences launching a new product to your marketing case studies. Maybe you will lend creative ideas to your learning team as you prepare a research project.

Perhaps you will tutor your learning teammate in accounting principles because he has never done accounting at work. Or you might contribute to the Media and Entertainment Club by leading a career trek or bringing a new speaker to campus. Think about what you have learned in your career and in prior academics that may help those around you.

This essay does not explicitly require examples of teamwork or leadership from your past experiences, but it will be a stronger essay if you provide evidence. Think about a time you demonstrated your collaborative approach to team problem solving, and consider how you can prove what you contributed to your community in your workplace or extracurricular activities.

Additional Question (required for all re-applicants):

Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)*

*First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

All re-applicants are required to provide information that supports your renewed candidacy. The most successful version of the re-applicant essay will provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year.

Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes are especially tangible and convincing, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can serve as reasonable updates.

A rejection or waitlist last year is a form of feedback, and may have led to soul searching for you. When you describe your changes make sure reflect your ability to take feedback and improve. Describe how you approached the reapplication process after assessing your own strengths and weaknesses as a candidate and making the appropriate efforts to improve.

If you are not a re-applicant you may use this space to address any areas of concern in your application. If you have a low GPA or GMAT, gaps in your resume, grades under a C in any quantitative courses, disciplinary action in undergrad or anything else that you want to explain, this is where you would provide a brief explanation and any supporting evidence to show you have moved past the setback and corrected any concerns.

Contact Stacy Blackman Consulting for customized advice to give you that competitive edge in your Wharton application.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 10:26
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The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has posted the following MBA essay questions for the 2017-18 admissions season.

Essay 1:  What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

Essay 2: Teamwork is at the core of the Wharton MBA experience with each student contributing unique elements to our collaborative culture. How will you contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)

Additional Question (required for all re-applicants):

Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)*

*First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

For additional information on applying, please visit the Wharton MBA admissions website.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 10:58
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This week, Forbes released its 10th biennial ranking of MBA programs, which are divided into three categories: top U.S. programs; top one-year, non-U.S. programs; and top two-year, non-U.S. programs.

As you’ve probably noticed by now, each major ranking has its own particular emphasis, and the Forbes ranking attempts to answer the question: is an MBA worth it?—based solely on the median returns on investment achieved by the graduates from the class of 2012.

“Our ranking of business schools is based on the return on investment achieved by the class of 2012. We examined more than 100 schools and reached out to 17,500 alumni around the globe. We compared graduates’ earnings in their first five years out of business school to their opportunity cost (two years of forgone compensation, tuition and required fees) to arrive at a five-year MBA gain, which is the basis for the final rank.”

University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School unseated Stanford Graduate School of Business to top the ranking of US-based MBA programs for the first time ever, with a five-year MBA gain of $97,100 (Wharton ranked seventh in 2015). With Stanford GSB now in second, Harvard Business School came in third, Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business round out the top five.

IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, takes the top spot this year among the one-year MBA programs, up one spot from 2015. The school had a five-year gain of $194,700. “IMD caps its annual enrollment at 90 students, allowing for a very individual approach regarding career services,” Forbes notes, adding that as many as 70 companies work with the school annually to recruit IMD grads.

INSEAD, which is ten times larger than IMD with a class size of 1,055 in 2017, ranks second among one-year programs. “With a five-year gain of $150,400, the payback period is a brisk 2.7 years thanks to salaries five years of school of nearly $190,000.”

Spain’s IE Business School moved up two spots in the rankings and now comes in third, based on its gain of $145,400. With an annual enrollment of 547 students, Forbes notes that IE is the second-biggest international MBA program behind INSEAD.

The Judge Business School at University of Cambridge ($140,000) and  Italy’s SDA Bocconi School of Management ($138,100) round out the top five one-year MBA programs.

For the fifth consecutive time, London Business School tops the list for two-year international MBA programs. “Alumni of its class of 2012 realized a 5-year gain of $119,100, the highest of any 2-year program in the world, and it took the typical graduate 3.4 years to pay back their investment,” Forbes explains, noting that, “In comparison, alumni of Wharton, the top-ranked MBA program in the U.S., saw a 5-year gain of $97,100 and took 3.8 years to pay back.”

Spain’s IESE Business School takes the second position, also for the fifth time in a row. “With a five-year gain of $97,100, up 15.5% compared to 2015, graduates of the Class of 2012 reported earning $156,140 in salary and bonus, the highest first year compensation among our ranked two-year international programs,” the rankings reveal.

The MBA program at China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) took the third position, with a five-year gain of $95,000, up 32% compared to 2015. ” The main contributing factor is the Class of 2012 reported having less work experience than prior surveyed classes, and as such, lower pre-MBA incomes,” Forbes explains.

Meanwhile, HEC Paris and Spain’s ESADE Business School round out the top-five non-US two-year MBA programs.

For more on this story, read the complete 2017 Forbes MBA rankings.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 11:01
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Bloomberg Businessweek has announced its list of 2017’s best business schools in the United States, and Harvard Business School took first place for the third straight year. The 2017  list is characterized by near constant movement, with only two schools in the top 20 holding on to their same position as last year, and the rest of the list shifting up and down in surprising ways.
Businessweek’s Top Ten Business Schools
  • Harvard Business School (no change)
  • Wharton School (6th in 2016)
  • MIT Sloan School of Management (7th in 2016)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business (no change)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business (2nd in 2016)
  • Duke’s Fuqua School of Business (3rd in 2016)
  • Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business (5th in 2016)
  • Kellogg School of Management (9th in 2016)
  • Columbia Business School (11th in 2016)
  • Rice Jones Graduate School of Business (8th in 2016)

Notably, two highly regarded MBA programs lost ground this year, with the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business slipping out of the Top Ten and placing 11th in the new ranking, and UVa Darden School of Business dipping from 12th last year to 17th in 2017.

The Bloomberg ranking methodology includes an employer survey (35% of score), alumni survey (30%), student survey (15%), job placement rate (10%), and starting salary (10%). MBA hopefuls should keep in mind that, because the full-time rankings comprise five elements, it’s possible to rank highly without knocking every category out of the ballpark. For example, Chicago Booth maintained its 4th place standing overall while ranking 35th in the alumni survey rank.

Click on over to Bloomberg Businessweek to see the details for all of the 85 schools ranked in this list. And remember, here at SBC we don’t like to encourage clients to focus too heavily on rankings when they’re making their MBA program selections. However, we also know those headed for b-school really can’t help themselves, so be sure to consider multiple factors when making your final school selection.
Image credit: Michael A. Herzog (CC BY-ND 2.0)
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 11 Dec 2017, 14:25
Students in the Class of 2019 have embarked on the journey toward their MBAs at business schools across the country. Among the diverse classes at each school, we wondered how large, exactly, is the proportion of women?

We at mbaMission examined the latest class profiles of 16 top-ranked business schools to determine which programs welcomed the most women among this year’s incoming classes. Although no school has yet to break the 50% mark, some may be well on their way. Two programs—the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania—featured 44% women within the Class of 2019. The University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business and the Yale School of Management followed closely with 43% each, as did Harvard Business School, the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, all with 42%. The fact that nearly all schools reported figures above 30% is quite encouraging. It will be interesting to see which business school will be the first to reach the halfway mark—and when!

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New post 30 Dec 2017, 10:12
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This week, for the first time ever, the Financial Times has published rankings simultaneously for the Americas and Asia-Pacific alongside the European tables. In the FT’s  2017 ranking of European business schools, the top 10 schools have remained the same this year with just  bit of shuffling of positions.

Here’s a snapshot of the top-ranked schools in the various regions.
Top Ten European Business Schools
  • London Business School
  • HEC Paris
  • IE Business School
  • University of St Gallen
  • INSEAD
  • SDA Bocconi
  • IESE Business School
  • ESADE Business School
  • Rotterdam School of Management
  • IMD
Top Ten Business Schools: Americas
  • Wharton School
  • Columbia Business School
  • MIT Sloan School of Management
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Michigan Ross School of Business
  • Duke Fuqua School of Business
  • Harvard Business School
  • UCLA Anderson School of Management
  • Kellogg School of Management
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business
Top Ten Business Schools: Asia-Pacific
  • Antai College of Economics and Management, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • CEIBS
  • National University of Singapore Business School
  • IIM Ahmedabad
  • HKUST Business School
  • IIM Bangalore
  • Nanyang Business School
  • Tongi University SEM
  • CUHK Business School
  • University of Hong Kong

This FT composite ranking measures the quality and range of postgraduate programs. The table of 95 schools is based on their performances in the 2017 rankings for MBAs, Executive MBAs, Masters in Management and the two tables for executive education. For more detailed information, please visit the Financial Times by following the links above.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 30 Dec 2017, 10:14
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Forté Foundation reports this week that women’s enrollment in full-time MBA programs at its member schools – which represent the top business schools in the US and abroad – continued to climb in 2017 to 37.4% on average, up 4% from 33.4% five years ago in the fall of 2013.

In the last five years, women’s enrollment at Forté Foundation member schools has steadily gained each year. This fall, 17 schools had 40% or more women enrolled, up from only two schools that reached this milestone in the fall of 2013.

Also, 26 schools had 35% or more women enrolled, more than double from 12 schools in 2013. The fall of 2017 is the first year that two schools reached 45% or more women enrolled. (The Wharton School and George Washington University School of Business.) And three other schools, two in the US and one in the UK, are close behind at 44%.

“This progress demonstrates that gender parity is not a pipe dream. Although women’s enrollment in business school is a slow and steady growth story, at this rate we could reach an average of 40% women’s enrollment in top business schools in less than five years and 50% by 2030,” says Elissa Sangster, Executive Director of Forté Foundation.

“Why is this significant? There is evidence that an MBA can provide both career advancement and significant pay gains for women, giving them greater economic mobility. And efforts to support women to pursue an MBA can contribute to a more diverse leadership pipeline at companies.”

The following 17 Forté member business schools have 40% or higher women’s enrollment:
  • Alliance Manchester Business School – UK
  • Columbia Business School – US
  • Dartmouth College (Tuck School of Business) – US
  • George Washington University School of Business – US
  • Harvard Business School – US
  • Imperial College Business School – UK
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan School of Management) – US
  • Northwestern University (Kellogg School of Management) – US
  • University of California Berkeley (Haas School of Business) – US
  • The University of Chicago (Booth School of Business) – US
  • University of Michigan (Ross School of Business) – US
  • University of Oxford (Saïd Business School) – UK
  • University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)– US
  • The University of Texas at Austin (McCombs School of Business) – US
  • University of Toronto (Rotman School of Management) – Canada
  • Yale School of Management – US
  • York University (Schulich School of Business) – Canada
These nine schools have 35% or greater women’s enrollment:
  • Arizona State University (W. P. Carey School of Business) – US
  • HEC-Paris – France
  • London Business School – UK
  • New York University (Stern School of Business) – US
  • University of California – Los Angeles (Anderson School of Management) – US
  • University of Cambridge (Judge Business School) – UK
  • University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign (Gies College of Business) – US
  • University of Virginia (Darden School of Business) – US
  • Washington University in St. Louis (Olin Business School) – US

Forté Foundation is a non-profit consortium of leading multinational corporations, top business schools in the US and abroad, and the Graduate Management Admission Council. It was called to action by a landmark research study, Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity, that looked at why women are underrepresented in top business schools compared with medical or law schools.

Forté Foundation was launched in 2001 to address this inequity and its impact on the business landscape, and grew to 25 member schools in 2005 in the US. Today, Forté Foundation includes 51 member schools: 39 in the US, four in Canada and eight in Europe.
Image credit: Flickr user IamNotUnique (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 12 Feb 2018, 14:16
The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania plans to send out Round 2 interview invitations on February 8, and once again, the school is using its team-based discussion format rather than a traditional admissions interview to evaluate its candidates. Understandably, Wharton applicants get anxious about this atypical interview, because the approach creates a very different dynamic from what one usually encounters in a one-on-one meeting—and with other applicants also in the room, one cannot help but feel less in control of the content and direction of the conversation. Yet despite the uncertainty, here are a few things that interviewees can expect:

  • You will need to arrive at the interview with an idea—a response to a challenge that will be presented in your interview invitation.
  • Having the best idea is much less important than how you interact with others in the group and communicate your thoughts. So while you should prepare an idea ahead of time, that is only part of what you will be evaluated on.
  • Your peers will have prepared their ideas as well. Chances are that ideas will be raised that you know little or nothing about. Do not worry! The admissions committee members are not measuring your topical expertise. Instead, they want to see how you add to the collective output of the team.
  • After the team-based discussion, you will have a short one-on-one session with someone representing Wharton’s admissions team. More than likely, you will be asked to reflect on how the team-based discussion went for you; this will require self-awareness on your part.
To give candidates the opportunity to undergo a realistic test run before experiencing the actual event, we created our Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation. Via this simulation, applicants participate anonymously with three to five other MBA candidates in an online conversation, which is moderated by two of our experienced Senior Consultants familiar with Wharton’s format and approach. All participants then receive feedback on their performance, with special focus on their interpersonal skills and communication abilities. The simulation builds confidence by highlighting your role in a team, examining how you communicate your ideas to—and within—a group of (equally talented) peers, and discovering how you react when you are thrown “in the deep end” and have to swim. Our Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation allows you to test the experience so you are ready for the real thing!

The 2018 Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation Round 2 schedule is as follows:
  • Group A: Monday, February 12 at 9:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group B: Tuesday, February 13 at 9:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group C: Wednesday, February 14 at 6:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group D: Thursday, February 15 at 6:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group E: Friday, February 16 at 3:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group F: Saturday, February 17 at 11:00 a.m. ET 
  • Group G: Sunday, February 18 at 11:00 a.m. ET 
  • Group H: Sunday, February 18 at 2:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group I: Monday, February 19 at 6:00 p.m. ET 
  • Group J: Tuesday, February 20 at 6:00 p.m. ET
  • Group K: Tuesday, February 20 at 9:00 p.m. ET 

To learn more or sign up for a session, visit our Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation page.
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New post 04 Apr 2018, 10:28
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Every year, top business schools receive thousands of applications for admission, but they only admit an average of 25% of those who apply.

The story is no different at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, where approximately half of all applicants are interviewed, but less than one in 10 are ultimately granted admission — and no student is admitted without an interview.

As consultants who help clients earn admission to top MBA programs, we know first-hand the importance of interviews. They’re a key component of how the admissions committee gets a full picture of you as an applicant, and evaluates whether you’ll fit into the Wharton community.

See our three tips for ensuring your Wharton interview strategy shows your assets and skills off to their best advantage:
1. Prepare for the team-based discussion.
Wharton was among the first business schools in the US to implement a team-based discussion component as part of the interview process, in which five to six applicants discuss a topic while being observed by admissions committee members.

This aspect of the application is designed to get a sense of who you are outside of a well-written essay or even a well-rehearsed interview. Wharton is looking for team players and people who can be analytical while working well with others.

Keep in mind that observers want to see candidates contributing without dominating the discussion; the idea is to see how you might engage in a productive conversation with a group of future classmates. To make a positive impression, be sure to share your point of view, but also listen thoughtfully; respect differing points of view; and bring others into the conversation.
2. Emphasize your experience as an innovator.
Innovation is integral to Wharton’s brand. This doesn’t have to mean you’ve invented the next billion-dollar app or founded a company, but it does denote someone who creates something that has not existed before — whether that’s a new product, process, or way of seeing the world.

To emphasize this aspect of your personality or experience, think of ways you’ve acted as a “change agent” in your workplace or community. Wharton wants students who are dynamic and energized about looking to change industries, economies, and even their countries.

Find examples of how you’ve seen the potential to make things better — and taken action to create positive change.
3. Show your aptitude for thriving in a global environment.
Approximately 40% of Wharton’s students hail from countries outside the US, so awareness and appreciation of other cultures is key to an applicant’s ability to survive and thrive at Wharton and in today’s multinational world of business.

Showing global awareness isn’t necessarily about the number of stamps on your passport. Rather, it’s about showing that you thrive in new and unfamiliar environments, and can successfully navigate the challenges of competing in a global marketplace.

If your career goals transcend borders, be sure to share your planned career path, and if you have experience working with global teams, be prepared with examples of challenges and successes. Above all, an honest curiosity and willingness to learn about other cultures and countries will go a long way.

Ultimately, remember that interviews for Wharton or any other top business school are designed not to be another hurdle standing in the way of your MBA, but as a way for the admissions committee to get to know you better.

The interview allows you to connect the dots of your personal narrative and tell your story in your unique voice. Emphasizing your strengths and experiences as they relate to qualities that are important to each school’s learning community will help show how you’ll fit in and be a contributing member, and indeed an asset, to that school’s learning community.

So if you’re prepared to work well with a team, emphasize innovation in your approach, and share your global perspective, and you could find yourself on the positive side of Wharton’s competitive interview and application process.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Poonam, founder and president of myEssayReview, is publishing interviews of her most recent successful students.  This is the latest in the series. Here is a chat with Mansi, who was accepted into 5 top MBA programs –Kellogg, Wharton, INSEAD, Stanford, and Harvard. Mansi is headed to Harvard, her dream school.

Mansi’s interview is published in 4 parts wherein she shares her background, goals, reasons to pursue MBA, unwavering preference for HBS, application strategy and preparation, her success mantra, advice on video essays, and much more.

Now presenting the concluding part of the interview wherein Mansi shares her success mantra and her personal interests and  hobbies.

Poonam: What is the Mantra of your astounding success? Not many people are able to achieve what you have achieved. That is why I would like to know  about the Mantra of your phenomenal success.

Mansi: That is a tough one. I think everyone will have their own set of ways to achieve their goal. For me, number one mantra is hard work. In life, there is no short cut to success. It is the way you look at things. You have to have sleepless nights, and long days, and give enough time to achieve your goal, sacrifice other things in the life, and still maintain a balance. As you had rightly suggested- start early. The best way is to start early to give ample time to application.

The second Mantra is ‘strategy’. If I had pushed myself to apply to Harvard in Round I and had not listened to you, I am sure I could not have accomplished it. The kind of story that I had in Round I or the kind of confidence I had in my story in Round I was much less compared to what I had in Round II. Again, I came to know myself a lot more in  four five months than the two months I had before Round I deadlines. So you have to  strategize really well because your dream school deserves the best of your time, your strategy, and your hard work.  I would advise applicants to  give it enough time and thought, and strategize well.

The third Mantra is the ‘introspection’. Indian applicants have never gone through such a process; they have only prepared course material and taken exams. But B- school application is entirely a different process. It does have an exam which requires a lot of introspection, and it also has an interview process which truly focuses on your soft skills. Lastly, working on your weaknesses is also very important for which self-reflection is the key because unless you know your worth yourself, you will not know what you are weak at. Especially for the interview processes, you should be confident of handling your weaknesses and what you can do to mitigate them.

Poonam: That is right. It is a process of self-discovery, and by the time you reached Harvard Application, you had already discovered yourself.

Mansi: Absolutely.

Poonam: And I have memorized all your stories by heart.

Mansi: Yes. I know. And sometimes, I was actually amazed, when you would return my essays with comments that  this example does not fit this essay as much as the other example. You remembered all my stories which at times I had forgotten. You rightly said that this is a process of self-discovery. I also remember the 30 minute Harvard interview that happened in Mumbai; those 30 minutes felt like 3 hours, as we had a conversation which I would normally have with somebody in 3 hours. It was short, yet it covered almost every aspect of my life, professional as well as personal. If I had not known about myself that well, I could not have given that 3 hours’ worth of information in thirty minutes.

Poonam: True.  It has truly been a long and arduous journey. You must have made many personal sacrifices as well. Would you like to share those with us?

Mansi: Yes, Poonam. Very rightly said. You have to work hard towards what is really important to you. And in that particular process, you have to sacrifice other things to achieve what you really want to. As you are aware, I am married, and I had sacrificed a lot of my family time. At the same time, I am really thankful to my husband who has been immensely supportive all this while. I had to miss family time, festivals, get -togethers, and weddings. I am blessed to have a supportive family and husband. I will share this one particular incident when we were celebrating Deepawali at my in-laws place in Mumbai. I had gotten my first interview invite from Kellogg which was right after Deepawali, and  my husband prepared for all pooja and stuff while I was preparing for my interview questions. So yes, I had sacrificed a lot of different things- birthdays, family functions,  TV and movies, but I am sure that at the end of day, those are totally worth it.

Poonam: Definitely. They all must be very proud of you for this extraordinary achievement. I am proud of you.

Mansi: Thank you, Poonam. Yes, they are.

Poonam:  Let us talk about something outside of professional area. What are your hobbies, interests? What are your favorite books?

Mansi: As you know very well, I love to dance. Throughout my entire application process, I used to go for my dance class at least once a week to rejuvenate myself. I occasionally read science fiction. I am not a regular reader though.

Poonam: You are a certified Scuba diver as well.

Mansi: Yes. I am a certified scuba diver. I have dived in many countries such as Malaysia, India, Maldives, and Thailand. I can dive up to 18ft. Next month, I and my husband are going to Thailand for another diving trip after a gap of one year.

Poonam: Very good. Mansi, will you like to share anything that I have not asked?

Mansi: I have discussed almost all the aspects of application process. Again, key parts of your application process are- have a strong GMAT score, partner with a good consultant, strategize in which Round and which schools you apply to, start early, give yourself enough time for self-reflection, and definitely work hard. There is no short cut to success. Give your best. I am sure you can achieve what you want.

Poonam: Thank you for sharing your story. Your story will be inspirational for the prospective applicants.

Mansi: Thank you, Poonam. This is not only my story; this is your story as well.

Poonam: It is really nice of you to think that way.

Mansi:  This is a process you can’t do alone. This is a process where you need supportive people around you. So equal amount of thank you to you as well.

Poonam: Thank you so much. It was my privilege. I really enjoyed being part of your MBA journey. And I wish you good luck with Harvard. I hope you will have a wonderful time there. I will like to get in touch with you later.

Mansi: Definitely. I will keep you updated with my case studies at HBS.

Poonam: Wonderful. Thank you. It was a pleasure chatting with you.

Note: 

Part 1- Mansi's Background, Goals, Reasons to do MBA, and Preference for HBS

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-top-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard/

Part 2- Mansi's' Application Strategy, Planning and Preparation

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-top-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard-part-2/

Part 3- Mansis’ Most Challenging Part of the Application Process, and her advice on video essays

http://myessayreview.com/student-interviews/indian-engineers-journey-5-tops-mba-programs-including-dream-school-harvard-part-3/

This interview was first published in  myEssayReview blog.

For questions, email Poonam at poonam@myessayreview.com

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 10:04
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The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania has received a commitment of $4 million from alum William P. Lauder to endow the William P. Lauder Wharton Leadership Fellows Program.

Wharton Leadership Fellows are a community of second-year MBA students who mentor, coach, and support first-year students in developing their potential and strengthening their performance as learning teams.

Over the course of 15 months, the fellows receive intensive leadership development opportunities that first focus on enhancing their own abilities and then transition to hands-on experience building those skills in others. Fellows play a critical role in strengthening team dynamics, providing feedback, addressing conflict, and coaching individual growth and development.

Lauder is a member of the University of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees, the Lauder Institute Board of Governors, the Wharton Leadership Advisory Board, and a lecturer in the Wharton School.

“I have always believed that great leaders are also great teachers, coaches, and mentors,” says Lauder, who serves as Executive Chairman of The Estée Lauder Companies.

“That’s what I expect of leaders at The Estée Lauder Companies, and what I hope to model for MBA students. I’ve been fortunate to have many extraordinary mentors in my career — my father Leonard A. Lauder, W’54, chief among them — and I’ve been consistently impressed by the ways in which Wharton Leadership Fellows enhance and contribute to the learning culture at Wharton. I am thrilled to support this outstanding program’s continued growth and evolution.”

This gift continues the Lauder family’s longstanding commitment to supporting education and the Penn community — from the Lauder Institute, to student fellowships, to numerous capital projects, including the recently completed New College House at 3335 Woodland Walk — and enriching the Penn experience for future generations of students.

“William Lauder’s contributions to the Penn community extend far beyond his generous financial support,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann. “William is an active presence on campus, sharing his time and insight with our students enrolled in his popular MBA course and providing exceptional advice and guidance to University leadership as a member of the Penn Board of Trustees. William’s investment in the Wharton community is a deeply personal one, and he has been an extraordinary asset to our students over the years as a teacher, mentor, and role model. I look forward to watching the William P. Lauder Wharton Leadership Fellows Program flourish under his stewardship.”

Income from the endowment will provide sustainable resources to select, train, and support the Wharton Leadership Fellows in their work with first-year MBA students. Lauder’s gift will also bring a new one-day leadership symposium to the William P. Lauder Wharton Leadership Fellows Program dedicated to exploring leadership principles in action.

“William embodies the core Wharton value of empowering leaders to change the world and we are deeply honored by his decision to endow the William P. Lauder Wharton Leadership Fellows Program,” said Wharton Dean Geoff Garrett. “The Leadership Fellows Program is a jewel in the Wharton MBA crown providing life-changing experiences for countless students. With William’s partnership, the program’s reach and impact will grow exponentially.”

Lauder is already known as an innovator among the Wharton faculty. The course he created and teaches, MGMT 892: Decision Making in the Leadership Chair, now in its sixth year, brings renowned business and civic leaders into the classroom each week to share lessons from their careers with second-year MBA students.

In 2014, Mr. Lauder was recognized by his fellow faculty members with the Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award for the by-application course, which consistently ranks among the school’s most popular electives.

“I have had the privilege of working with William for the past decade on various programs for senior leaders through our Executive Education partnership, and on his outstanding course, Decision Making in the Leadership Chair,” said Professor Michael Useem, director of the Center for Leadership and Change Management and the William and Jacalyn Egan Professor of Management at Wharton.

“William’s passion for teaching and love of learning are second to none, and his insight and experience as a leader of a global company make him the ideal sponsor for the Wharton Leadership Fellows Program. I am pleased to partner with him to continue building this signature program for future generations of leaders.”
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 31 May 2018, 13:18
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The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has announced the following full-time MBA application deadlines for the 2018-2019 admissions season.
Round 1
Application due: September 18, 2018
Decision released: December 13, 2018
Round 2
Application due: January 3, 2019
Decision released: March 21, 2019
Round 3
Application due: April 2, 2019
Decision released: May 9, 2019

To be considered for a round, candidates must submit a completed application by 5 p.m. Eastern Time (ET) on the day of the deadline. If you need to apply for a student visa to study in the United States, Wharton recommends that you apply in Round 1 or 2. For more information, please visit the Wharton School MBA admissions website.

 
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 31 May 2018, 13:18
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If you have more than ten years of work experience, extensive career advancement and managerial experience, an Executive MBA is a great choice if you’re interested in remaining with your employer and have your company’s support to pursue a graduate management degree. Students typically report exceptionally high satisfaction rates with their decision to pursue an EMBA, as it results in better salary and increased career opportunities.

QS recently released its ranking of the top Executive MBA programs for 2018, and nine of the top ten are located in the United States or the United Kingdom, with the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania taking the number-one spot.
QS’s Top Ten EMBA Programs
  • Wharton School
  • MIT Sloan School of Managemnt
  • London Business School
  • Kellogg School of Management
  • UC Berkeley Haas School of Business
  • University of Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Columbia Business School
  • Oxford’s Said Business School
  • UCLA Anderson School of Management
  • Cambridge Judge School of Business
“Wharton possesses the largest alumni network of any business school in the world,” QS CEO Nunzio Quacquarelli is quoted as saying in a statement, “—over 96,000 at the last count—and it’s a network that unites quantity with quality, with Wharton EMBA alumni going on to adopt executive roles at influential organizations in both the private and public sector. The Wharton EMBA remains a globally renowned indicator of alumnus quality for top employers.”
How are the rankings compiled?
  • Employer Reputation (30%): An investigation as to whether employers regard graduates from this prospective program highly.
  • Thought Leadership (25%): Whether the school has the capacity to innovate, and encourage innovation.
  • Executive Suite (15%): How experienced are the EMBA peers on the course and how much c-suite representation is in the program.
  • Career Outcomes (20%): How likely the program will support alumni careers in terms of salary increase and promotions after graduation.
  • Diversity (10%): Whether the program offers high levels of gender and international diversity.

Wharton attained perfect scores of 100 in three of five metrics QS used to rank the programs: Employer Reputation, Thought Leadership, and Career Outcomes, and was the only program to do so.

“In addition to rankings inputs this year, we also collected relevant insights from schools that are top of mind for candidates. Funding the educational experience is clearly a big consideration for today’s EMBA students, especially as tuition in parts of the world continues to increase,” says Alex Chisholm, Head of Business School Analytics at QS.

“Thankfully, many students pursuing EMBA degrees are fortunate to have financial support from their employers. Business schools reported to QS that nearly half of their students receive some level of corporate sponsorship, on average, with around 20 percent obtaining full funding. This willingness to invest in talent is a testament to the immediate and long-term value of the degree as perceived by global employers.”
SBC’s Advice for the EMBA Applicant
Starting the research for your EMBA journey is similar to the path of any full time applicant. Thinking first about your career goals and how an EMBA is going to accelerate your growth is key. Next you will want to research programs. Finally, you will want to start strategizing about your application process.

There are a few differences between the weight placed on the various factors between a full time program and an EMBA program. Your history of advancement at work and your perception as a high potential employee are far more important to your EMBA admission prospects than your GMAT score or GPA.

EMBA programs are interested in knowing who you are, and what your potential is. The admissions committee will expect maturity and introspection in a senior level candidate, and will want to understand your own personal business case. What do you see accomplishing with the EMBA degree? As you approach your essays, be as specific as possible. Your strategic thinking abilities have resulted in career success—apply those skills to explaining why an EMBA is the next step for you.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 20 Jun 2018, 09:00
Often spurned at the last minute for Harvard Business School (HBS), the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and, at times, Columbia Business School, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, possibly more than any other top MBA program, really wants to know that you want to earn your degree there. So, we were not at all surprised to see that Wharton has maintained the prompt for its first essay, which requires applicants to explain their professional rationale for wanting to go to Wharton. (Note that by contrast, HBS does not ask candidates to spell out “Why HBS?”) And even though the school has replaced its second essay question from last season with a new one about an “impactful experience or accomplishment,” the admissions committee still wants to know “How will you use what you learned through that experience to contribute to the Wharton community?” In other words, “Really convince us that you understand our program, and tell us why you will fit in here.” So again, in your second essay, you will need to demonstrate your knowledge of how Wharton works and the place/role you envision for yourself within it. We suggest that to respond effectively to Wharton’s prompts, you go the extra mile in learning about the school, so that you can write thoughtful, nuanced essays. Connect with students and alumni, attend admissions events, and especially, visit the campus (if possible) to get the kind of in-depth insight that will show the admissions committee you are really serious about Wharton and are confident you belong there.

Essay 1: What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

In a mere 500 words, you must discuss your career goals—giving very brief context for why they are realistic for you—and then reveal how Wharton will help you pursue these goals by demonstrating a thorough understanding of what the school offers and a well-thought-out game plan for availing yourself of these offerings. To effectively do this, you must first familiarize yourself with Wharton’s various resources and pinpoint those that truly pertain to you and the direction in which you hope to go. Simply presenting a list of classes that you think sound interesting will not suffice here, and avoid vague statements about how great the school is. You must clearly demonstrate a connection between your aspirations, what you need to achieve them (e.g., skills, experience[s], connections, exposure), and what Wharton in particular can provide that will enable you to fill those gaps.

Note that Wharton asks applicants to address only the professional aspect—not the professional and personal aspect (as it has in past years)—of their business school goals. This allows you to share your career-related stories and ambitions more fully, which in turn means you can and should use the other essay(s) to discuss non-work aspects of your life and thereby provide a more complete and well-rounded picture of yourself for the admissions committee.

In many ways, this prompt is asking for a typical MBA personal statement. We therefore encourage you to download your free copy of the mbaMission Personal Statement Guide. This complimentary guide offers detailed advice on approaching and framing these subjects, along with multiple illustrative examples. Be sure to claim your copy today.

Essay 2: Describe an impactful experience or accomplishment that is not reflected elsewhere in your application. How will you use what you learned through that experience to contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)

The phrase “not reflected elsewhere” will likely cause some applicants a bit of anxiety, but let us reassure you—you will not be ejected from the applicant pool for taking an experience represented in a single bullet point on your resume and exploring it here in essay form. Likewise, the school will not penalize you if your recommender ends up writing about the same “impactful experience” you decide to showcase in this essay, because, most likely, you will not even know what he/she has written about! The key here is to focus on the “impactful experience or accomplishment” itself. As long as it is not described in depth in your resume or short answers, it should pass the “not reflected elsewhere” test.

We would recommend using the first 250 words of this essay to discuss a key experience, but even with such limited space, you will likely need to show that you sustained some bumps and bruises along the way, so that you can also reveal that you learned from the experience. By “showing,” or really spelling out, how things unfolded—rather than just stating an accomplishment and listing the takeaways—you will give the admissions reader some perspective on how you conduct yourself and how you achieve. You will then need to show connections between what you learned and the Wharton MBA experience, citing specific ways you will contribute. For example, a failed “side hustle” entrepreneurial project may have given you some valuable insights and skills that you could now pass on to your classmates in a myriad of classes or clubs that revolve around entrepreneurship, or maybe it gave you an interesting new  perspective on commitment, determination, or countless other learnings. The specific knowledge you gained is not as important as conveying how you envision applying it as a student in the program, thereby revealing your knowledge of the school.

To better familiarize yourself with the Wharton program and get an insider’s perspective on its academic program, unique offerings, social life, and other key characteristics, be sure to download a complimentary copy of the mbaMission Insider’s Guide to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Additional Essay:  Required for all reapplicants. Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)

First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

If you are a Wharton reapplicant, this essay is pretty straightforward. Whether you have improved your academic record, received a promotion, begun a new and exciting project, increased your community involvement, or taken on some sort of personal challenge, the key to success with this essay is conveying a very deliberate path of achievement. Wharton wants to know that you have been actively striving to improve yourself and your profile, and that you have seized opportunities during the previous year to do so, because a Wharton MBA is vital to you. The responses to this essay question will vary greatly from one candidate to the next, because each person’s needs and experiences differ. We are more than happy to provide one-on-one assistance with this highly personal essay to ensure that your efforts over the past year are presented in the best light possible.

However, if you are not a Wharton reapplicant, pay special attention to the last line of this prompt: First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances.  Here is your opportunity—if needed—to address any lingering questions that an admissions officer might have about your candidacy, such as a poor grade or overall GPA, a low GRE or GMAT score, or a gap in your work experience. If you feel you may need to submit an additional essay for such a reason, consider downloading your free copy of our mbaMission Optional Essays Guide, in which we offer detailed advice on when and how to take advantage of the optional essay (along with multiple sample essays) to help you mitigate any problem areas in your profile.

The Next Step—Mastering Your Wharton Interview: Many MBA candidates find admissions interviews stressful and intimidating, but mastering this important element of the application process is definitely possible—the key is informed preparation. And, on your way to this high level of preparation, we offer our free Interview Primers to spur you along! Download your free copy of The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania Interview Primer today.
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New post 29 Jun 2018, 16:07
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The Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania has updated the second essay question in this set of essays this year. Wharton is seeking to understand who you are and what motivates you in this set of essays. Beyond your credentials and experience, will you fit in with the Wharton community? How will you contribute? Wharton values diversity and teamwork, and wants a class that will work well with each other.

As you consider how to approach this set of essays, get to know the Wharton community. Some possible ways to connect include campus visits, online research and the many admissions events around the globe. Wharton has a specific culture, and fit with that culture is an important part of the admissions criteria.

Essay 1: What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

This is both a standard career goals question and an inquiry into your personality and potential success in the program. Jordan Mock, WG’16 wrote a blog post with three excellent tips for this essay, in which he says, “Wharton is unique and your essay should reflect that.”

Be careful to answer the specific question in this career goals essay. Notice that you are not asked about your professional background or your key accomplishments outright. To answer the question asked, you will want to focus mainly on the future and what you are planning to pursue with your MBA degree. How will a Wharton MBA help you “connect the three career dots” that Jordan writes about?

To answer the question there is room to add color by using your background information where it is most relevant to your goals. Think about the key moments of your professional life that crystallized your goals for you, and focus on illuminating those decision points rather than reciting your entire resume. Anything unique in your background is always worth highlighting.

Understanding exactly how you fit in will help you describe what Wharton will do for you, as well as navigate interviews and other interactions with the Wharton admissions committee. Consider including specific information from your Wharton research in this essay such as Wharton faculty you would like to study with or unique educational opportunities at Wharton.

When you address your personal goals for the MBA make sure you are making the case for Wharton specifically. Consider what living in Philadelphia might be like, the many clubs and student activities, and leadership development opportunities like traveling to Antarctica with your classmates that may address some of your personal life goals.

Essay 2: Describe an impactful experience or accomplishment that is not reflected elsewhere in your application. How will you use what you learned through that experience to contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)

Wharton is an intense academic environment, but also a strong community with focus on teamwork and learning from each other. As you select a topic for this essay, think about a time you demonstrated your collaborative approach to team problem solving. What have you done that can show how you will contribute to the community?

Your contribution to the Wharton community could be in the classroom, clubs or within small group projects. You might bring your experiences launching a new product to your marketing case studies. Maybe you will lend creative ideas to your learning team as you prepare a research project, because you have demonstrated creativity in your past accomplishments.

Perhaps you have shown a tendency to teach and mentor others, and you plan to help your learning teammates with skills that they may not have learned in their own past work.

Or you might contribute to the Media and Entertainment Club by leading a career trek or bringing a new speaker to campus because you have connections from a prior career experience. Think about what you have learned in your career and in prior academics that may help those around you at Wharton.

Additional Question (required for all Reapplicants): Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)*

*First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

All re-applicants are required to provide information that supports your renewed candidacy. The most successful version of the re-applicant essay will provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year.

Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes are especially tangible and convincing, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can serve as reasonable updates.

A rejection or waitlist last year is a form of feedback, and may have led to soul searching for you. When you describe your changes make sure reflect your ability to take feedback and improve. Describe how you approached the reapplication process after assessing your own strengths and weaknesses as a candidate and making the appropriate efforts to improve.

If you are not a re-applicant you may use this space to address any areas of concern in your application. If you have a low GPA or GMAT, gaps in your resume, grades under a C in any quantitative courses (Wharton cares specifically about calculus, statistics and microeconomics – classes like finance and accounting are less indicative of core quant ability), disciplinary action in undergrad or anything else that you want to explain, this is where you would provide a brief explanation and any supporting evidence to show you have moved past the setback and corrected any concerns.

Contact Stacy Blackman Consulting for customized advice to give you that competitive edge in your Wharton application.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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New post 29 Jun 2018, 16:09
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This year, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has updated the MBA essay questions for the 2018-19 admissions cycle. First-time applicants and re-applicants are required to complete both essays.

Per the Wharton MBA admissions website, the Admissions Committee wants to get to know you on both a professional and personal level, and encourages you to be introspective, candid and succinct. Most importantly, be yourself.
Required MBA Essays
Essay 1: What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

Essay 2: Describe an impactful experience or accomplishment that is not reflected elsewhere in your application. How will you use what you learned through that experience to contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words)
Additional Question (required for all Reapplicants)
Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)*

*First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

For additional information on applying, please visit the Wharton MBA admissions website.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2018, 08:26
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Re: Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 09:28
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Round one (1) applications are just around the corner. By now you should have had a conversation, or two, with your recommenders about your professional and academic goals. They should have also agreed to support your business school application(s).

It is common to feel a nervousness about the recommendation letters. Typical questions that arise, even at this stage, are: Have I chosen the right person? What are they going to write about me? Will they write at length and in detail about my accomplishments? Are there areas in which I could receive a less than an ideal review? etc.

For these questions to be on your mind is perfectly normal. After all, a lot is riding on that glowing reference letter.

A good recommendation letter is one that comes from a supervisor, client, or project leader who can communicate, in vivid detail, your professional achievements and can speak to your professional goals and ambitions. Instead of wondering what the recommender will write, why not spend that energy bringing the very best parts of your profile to the forefront of their mind. I ask you this: Have you prepared your recommender to give you a glowing recommendation?

If not, there is still time to reach out to them for these key issues.
RESUME
While your recommender might know you, your ambitions, and your accomplishments as it relates to your working for and with him/her, he/she is not aware, and should not be expected to be mindful of all your experiences and accomplishments. Be kind and share a copy of your resume – preferably the one you will be submitting with your b-school application(s). Your resume will give the recommender a basis from which to draw and can also be reminded of your accomplishments. They can then address specific examples that show your brilliance.
EXPERIENCES
Talk to your recommender(s) about events/experiences that have shaped your decision to pursue an MBA. What are some of the tools an MBA will equip you that may have enhanced your professional experience? Which experiences have demonstrated your readiness to succeed? When discussing experiences, be sure you talk about those relevant to your recommender. A paper you wrote in college is irrelevant to your supervisor in the Private Equity firm, for example. But, if the person supporting your application has witnessed you grow from an intern to a Senior Analyst, talking to him/her about your journey makes perfect sense. Remember to be specific, after all, the schools are asking your recommenders to be.
ADMINISTRATIVE
Not many people like the administrative process, but that is a part of admissions. Be sure you have given your recommender the details he/she needs to submit the letter. They should have already been added to your target school’s application portal, which sends an automatic email with instructions on how to proceed.

An application is considered complete only when all the required materials are submitted. The recommendation letter is one of those required documents and must be provided by the admission deadline of the schools you are targeting. Therefore, be sure you have communicated your target deadline to your recommender.

Finally, keep track of your recommender’s progress. From the school’s application portal, you can check on the status of your recommendation letters.  If your recommender has not submitted his/her letter of recommendation two weeks before the deadline, it is advisable to reach out with a friendly reminder.

Trust that you have made the right decision in choosing recommenders that want to help you succeed and waive your right to see the content of your recommenders’ letter. The recommender will be more inclined to be candid in their remarks, and the admissions team will add more weight to a recommendation letter that has not been seen by the applicant.

 

 
ABOUT SIA ADMISSIONS:
Sia Admissions Consulting is a boutique firm based in New York City. We specialize in coaching students of diverse background navigate university admissions process. Our goal is to partner with students to help them characterize and reflect their individuality in all areas of the admissions application.

At Sia, we firmly believe that “one-size” does not fit all—each student has his or her story that, if communicated properly, a university admissions committee is eager to hear; therefore, we coach each student in originally telling his or her story. Our partnership with each student consists of  – (i) recognizing the student’s story by asking poignant questions which help us (ii) identify the quintessence of his or her strengths and aspirations, so we may (iii) build an idiosyncratic strategy that helps the student distinctively present his or her story. Our aim is to coach student in showcasing a unique application that communicates their individuality as an ideal candidate for the field and institution of choice.
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Re: Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2018, 11:44
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When thinking about the top business schools in the world, it’s easy to fall into the trap of assuming that all of the elite MBA programs are pretty much the same. While you will find consistencies as far as cost and quality of the education are concerned, many subtle—and some not so subtle—differences exist among highly ranked b-schools.

Find MBA’s Seb Murray recently wrote up a compare-and-contrast piece looking at University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and the Chicago Booth School of Business, and we shared our admissions intel with Murray based on what we’ve gleaned over the years from working with clients targeting both schools.
Side-By-Side Comparison of Booth and Wharton
These two programs share common ground when it comes to rankings—both regularly make the top seven—campus environment, access to an array of business resources, and a sterling reputation in finance. However, brand perception plays especially strong in favor of Wharton, given UPenn’s Ivy League status.

Click over to Murray’s article to see how each program stacks up as far as admissions requirements, selectivity and class profiles are concerned. As SBC principal Esther Magna puts it, “If quality is defined as a collaborative culture, Booth likely wins. If quality is defined as prestige of a student’s past work experience, Wharton likely wins.”

Do you have a strong favorite between these two top-ranked business schools? If so, leave a comment telling us why your choice is the better MBA option.
***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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Re: Expert advice for Wharton from Admissions Consultant blogs &nbs [#permalink] 31 Aug 2018, 11:44

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