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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 01:08
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Project SC Butler: Day 180: Sentence Correction (SC2)


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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so

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OFFICIAL EXPLANATION

Project SC Butler: Day 180: Sentence Correction (SC2)



• HIGHLIGHTS

This question tests the correct way to "repeat a predicate" without actually repeating the whole thing.

Every sentence has a subject and a predicate.

A simple predicate consists of just a verb:
He laughed.

A "complete" predicate consists of the verb and a verb phrase—everything that is not the subject:
He laughed at the comedian's joke.
The predicate is laughed at the comedian's joke.

Often in English we do not repeat the whole verb phrase, but we do use "substitution."
WE repeat a short version of the verb.
Some form of the verb TO DO (usually do, does, or did) can substitute for almost any verb in English.

In addition, the word SO can substitute for almost any verb phrase.

Substitution involves subtleties, a few of which have been missed.

Simplify things:
(1) DO and DO SO almost always work.

(2) DO IT works in only one situation: the verb that is being repeated is TO DO verb.

(3) DO THAT never works. THAT is not a standalone pronoun on the GMAT.

DO often works.
-- we cannot use DO or DO SO with TO BE verbs (is, are, were, was)
We cannot use DO or DO SO for HAVE as an auxiliary.

The word SO in DO SO is a lot like a pronoun.
The word So stands for a whole verb phrase, and not just in this situation.
Correct: The teacher told him to explain his answer, and he did.
Correct: The teacher told him to explain his answer, and he did so.
Correct: Did he explain his answer as the teacher instructed? Yes, I think so.
SO = explained his answer as the teacher instructed him to do.

Bottom line: this question tests the way in which we use the verb DO or the verb phrase DO SO as a substitute for another verb or verb phrase.
After the POE I explain under what circumstance we are allowed to use DO IT (rarely) and under what circumstances we are allowed to use DO SO (often).

• Meaning?
People should not deny Fanny Burney's historical importance as a novelist because she was hugely influential, but many critics have tried to deny Burney's historical importance.

THE PROMPT

Quote:
Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.


THE OPTIONS

Quote:
A) Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

• Incorrect. "Undeniable" is not a verb for which DO SO can stand in.
• the sentence is incoherent. Many critics have tried to deny Burney's historical importance as a novelist, but no verb deny exists — DO SO cannot stand in for undeniable, which is an adjective. A verb phrase, do so, cannot replace an adjective.
Eliminate A

Quote:
B) Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that.

is not able to be denied is awkward.
• we cannot say critics have attempted to do THAT. for two reasons
(1) that is not a standalone pronoun
(2) the verb able to be is not a TO DO verb, so we cannot use DO + PRONOUN
• We need DO + SO
Eliminate B

Quote:
C) Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so.

is not to be denied is a mouthful. This awkwardness is not enough to eliminate this option.
attempted is idiomatically followed by the infinitive TO VERB, not a gerund
Eliminate C - or hold and compare to E

Quote:
D) Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it.

• we can use DO IT only when the first verb is a TO DO verb and the object is a noun that can be captured by "it."
• [cannot] be denied is not a to do verb, so we cannot use do it
Eliminate D

Quote:
E) Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

• the action is that her importance cannot be denied (even though people have tried to deny it)
• we can use DO SO to take the place of that action

The correct answer is E

• NOTES

DO IT is allowed only if the first verb is a to do verb.
-- DO IT absolutely can stand in for a verb + an object.
Sabrina and Tess do the biology experiment. John and Daniel do it, too.

DO SO is required if the first verb is anything BUT a TO DO verb (or TO BE or HAVE as auxiliary)

(1) If the verb is a to do verb, we can use a shortened form of the verb phrase by using (1) just DO, DOES, or DID, or (2) DO + pronoun, including DO + IT

When the verb is a to do verb, we can repeat it with
--(1) DO, DOES, or DID and nothing more

Anne wants to do Pilates and her sister wants to do Pilates. →
Anne wants to do Pilates and her sister does, too.
[the verb attached to Anne and to her sister is a TO DO verb.]

--(2) DO + PRONOUN (almost never DO + NOUN)

Reva did her chemistry homework and math problems before Vivek did his chemistry homework and math problems.
Reva did her chemistry homework and math problems before VIvek did his.
[the verb attached to Reva and to Vivek is DID, a TO DO verb, so we can add a pronoun]

-- DO + IT is an example of DO + PRONOUN

Phillip did the chemistry experiment before Anne did her chemistry experiment.
Phillip did the chemistry experiment before Anne did it.
[the verb attached to Phillip and to Anne is DID, a TO DO verb, so we can add the pronoun IT, since an experiment is an IT]

-- not DO + THAT
THAT is not a standalone pronoun on the GMAT.
That is a relative pronoun.
I cannot say: Phillip did the chemistry experiment before Anne did that. :x

In the examples above, we have repeated the first verb, the "predicate," by using a form of TO DO—either just the verb, or the verb plus a pronoun.
The pronoun stands in for the noun that is the object of the first verb.
We can add a pronoun (including IT) to DO, DOES, or DID only if the first verb is a to do verb.

As soon as we change to any other verb, we must use DO do SO rather than do IT (or do pronoun).
-- SO is a lot like a pronoun.
-- SO stands in for entire verb phrases.
-- Some linguists and grammarians call "so" a "pro-verb" because it is the only verb that can stand in for another verb, in the same way that a pronoun can stand in for a noun.
Do not worry about the name. I give it to you so that you will remember that the little word "so" can do a lot.

(2) If the verb is not a to do verb, we can use DO or DO + SO

Kenya completed a triathlon before Omari completed a triathlon.
Correct: Kenya completed a triathlon before Omari did.
Correct, more formal: Kenya completed a triathlon before Omari did so.

Exceptions: we cannot use a TO DO verb to stand in for a TO BE verb, or for HAVE when HAVE is a helping verb.

-- Exception: TO DO cannot stand in for TO BE verbs
Celeste was excited about the trip to North Africa and Pierre did too. was, too.
I am very hungry and you do, too. :x

-- Exception: TO DO cannot stand in for have when have is an auxiliary (helping) verb
I had been at work for hours and he did, too. :x
I had been at work for hours and he had, too.

-- TO DO can stand in for HAVE when HAVE is not an auxiliary and means "possessed, owned, etc."
I had 10 dollars and you did, too.
But: She has gone shopping as has he.

Takeaways:
1) if the verb we want to repeat is a to do verb, we can use DO or DO + PRONOUN, including DO + IT

2) we cannot use DO + THAT. That is not a standalone pronoun on the GMAT.
-- that can be a relative pronoun: The dog that barked all night long.
-- that can be a determiner, something that points to a noun: Please sit on that red chair over there rather than on this brown chair here.
-- But that has not been a standalone pronoun (such as in DO THAT or DID THAT) on the GMAT. Avoid the construction.

3) if the verb is not a to do verb, we cannot use DO + pronoun.
But we can use either DO or DO SO.
"Do so" is sort of a magical little phrase. It is very versatile.
It is the only phrase that can stand in for a whole verb phrase in any tense, and even if the tenses shift in the same sentence.
Correct: I leave earlier for work than you usually did.
DID = LEFT FOR WORK

COMMENTS

I want to get this OE up . . . we have some misconceptions, I think.

EDIT: I am glad to see the exchange and discussion!
I am even more glad to see the goodwill. :)

If you got the right answer and explained well, you get kudos. :)
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 02:40
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 180: Sentence Correction (SC2)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so


1. Cannot be denied/undeniable/is not to be denied/ is not able to be denied
Cannot be denied is the best expression out of these since the 2nd part of the sentence says that many people have attempted to "deny it". If we use "undeniable" as in A then we cannot use "do so" or "do it/that" in the 2nd half. B & C use the wordy/ungrammatical expressions "is not to be denied/ is not able to be denied" to convey the same meaning.
So we can take out A,B & C

2. Do So/Do it
"Do it": "It" has to refer to a noun
"Do So": "So" refers to an action or a clause

Option D: "even though many critics have attempted to do it"
- the "it" in option D doesnt have any noun referent for itself.
- If we take "historical importance" as its referent then the sentence becomes
- "even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance"

The "do so" in E stands for "deny his historical importance"
- "even though many critics have attempted to do so"
So the sentence without ellipses is"
"even though many critics have attempted to deny his historical importance"

So E is the correct answer IMO.
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 07:58
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 180: Sentence Correction (SC2)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so


A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so - Do so - tried to un-deny it?

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that - "is not able to be denied" long and awkward construction

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so - " doing so" is incorrect. requires a verb "do so"

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it - " do it" - incorrect, what does it refer to

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so - Correct.
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 08:09
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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so usage of undeniable makes the sentence awkward

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that the use of that is incorrect

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so use of doing makes the sentence a fragment by omitting a verb

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it there is no antecedent for pronoun it

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so begins with cannot and correct comparison used leaves no ambiguity.

IMO E
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 09:54
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Do so, known as a pro-verb is used to replace a verb in a sentence to avoid repetition. Do it is used when the verb has an object which can be replaced by the pronoun it.

Option A: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so. to do so suggests that the verb is should be in the bare infinitive form be, and this also signals that it requires a modal verb can. Even if the verb is can be, substituting to be deniable in place of to do so still doesn't make much sense. ..even though many critics have attempted to be deniable. I believe a verb that expresses the action undeniable will be appropriate. A can be eliminated.

Option B: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that. is not able to be denied is grammatically awkward at best. A better form of expressing the action can be cannot be denied. B can be eliminated.

Option C: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so.
is not to be denied is wordy, so not concise compared with cannot be denied. In addition, I am not sure if doing so is appropriate in the context. to do so is more appropriate in my view because it explicitly expresses the purpose
or the intention of the critics better. We can eliminate option C.

Option D: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it.
There is no logical antecedent for the pronoun it. do so is required. Eliminated option D.

Option E: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so. do so rightly replaces deny Fanny Burney's historical importance. Cannot be denied rightly replace is undeniable.
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 13:53
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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so
'to do' so requires an action to refer back to, attempted to do what? "to deny" ...here undeniable is noun

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that
is not able to be denied - too wordy and 'that' should refer to singular noun or clause, here it refers to ->not able to be denied ... sentence doesn't make sense

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so
critics have attempted doing not to be denied -> too wordy

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it
it should refer to noun, it cannot refer to action..

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so
denied is an action and so refers to denied.

E is better!
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 15:56
OK. So the correct answer seems to be E.

But in D, we can successfully find an antecedent for it: Fanny Burney’s historical importance.
So, "Do it" = dispute Fanny Burney’s historical importance.

What is wrong with that?
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 17:42
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I wanted to write an explanation, but then saw a great explanation by Shivan21. Good job! :)
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 20:10
mykrasovski wrote:
I wanted to write an explanation, but then saw a great explanation by Shivan21. Good job! :)


mykrasovski

Thanks buddy for your kind words :blushing
Cheers!
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 20:37
Shivan21 wrote:
mykrasovski wrote:
I wanted to write an explanation, but then saw a great explanation by Shivan21. Good job! :)


mykrasovski

Thanks buddy for your kind words :blushing
Cheers!


You deserve it!

Though, regarding your comment that 'If we take "historical importance" as its referent then the sentence becomes "even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance"', I have a different idea: do can stand for verb "argue", so the sentence becomes
- even though many critics have attempted to argue his historical importance.
That sounds pretty good, doesn't it?
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 20:49
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Hi zhanbo, I do not think it is legit to substitute verbs in this particular problem, i.e. replace do by argue :) And clearly, the blue part in option D "Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance" has no sense... One cannot attempt to do a historical importance :) while it is possible to argue against a historical importance, discuss it, consider it, evaluate it, and so on...
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 21:45
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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so -- "is undeniable change meaning of the context.

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that -- is not able to be denied is awkward

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so -- is not able to be denied is awkward

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it -- it is ambiguous, what is "it" referring to

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so

Therefore, E
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 21:53
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Quote:
Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.


Quote:
A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so

Here do so implies undeny so wrong meaning.Eliminate A.

Quote:
B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that

that is a relative pronoun that can refer to noun only.here it's referring to deny which is a verb.so eliminate B.

Quote:
C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so

so when we have to be, the So cannot change the tense. here so is referring to denied ie., wrong so Eliminate C.

Quote:
D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it

same as B.it can only refer to nouns not verbs.Eliminate D.

Quote:
E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so

Perfect.
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New post 20 Oct 2019, 23:40
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 180: Sentence Correction (SC2)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so.

A) is undeniable, even though many critics have attempted to do so

B) is not able to be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do that

C) is not to be denied, even though many critics have attempted doing so

D) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do it

E) cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do so


Attempted to do so/Attempted to deny/ Attempted to criticise
Generally,You do criticise those things which can be criticised. We hardly go to criticise facts set.
Historical importance as a novelist is undeniable- fact. So you need to look for those options where Historical importance can be/can not be criticised.
D and E are the two options where meaning is clear, but in D there is no logical antecedent of pronoun "it".
E is perfect
E:)
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New post 21 Oct 2019, 04:08
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zhanbo wrote:
Shivan21 wrote:
mykrasovski wrote:
I wanted to write an explanation, but then saw a great explanation by Shivan21. Good job! :)


mykrasovski

Thanks buddy for your kind words :blushing
Cheers!


You deserve it!

Though, regarding your comment that 'If we take "historical importance" as its referent then the sentence becomes "even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance"', I have a different idea: do can stand for verb "argue", so the sentence becomes
- even though many critics have attempted to argue his historical importance.
That sounds pretty good, doesn't it?


Hi zhanbo,

Above all, congratulations on such great achievements in both GMAT and GRE! :thumbup:

It’s kind of interesting that, right from the start, I knew do so is what we are tested on here. However, your question made me think about the exact reasons for eliminating D. So, I did some research, and let me share what I inferred from it. We know that do it doesn’t work when it doesn’t have clear referent (noun), for example:

I wanted them to leave, and politely asked them to do it/so.

Here, there is no noun for it to refer to, so we definitely need so. However, as you pointed out, in D it can refer to Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist (when it stands for a noun to which essential mods are attached, it must stand for the noun + all essential mods). Additionally, in D do can stand in for deny. As a result we have:

D. FB’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do (deny) it (FB’s historical importance as a novelist).

Quite a legitimate sentence, isn’t it? What I have found out is that out of do so/ it/ that the first one is the most academic and the least ambiguous one. i.e. in colloquial English, when someone asks us “Send them a fax!”, we are used to answer “I’ll do so”, “I’ll do it” or even “I’ll do that”. But the latter two seem to be too informal for GMAT.

RonPurewal says: 'do it' is not always wrong. However, our research has shown that very few GMAT problems, if any, contain 'do it' in their correct forms, whereas 'do so' has been the crux of several problems. Remember, it's not just the correct grammar that matters - it also matters how likely it is that each particular concept will show up on the test.

Although MGMAT provides an example for do it, in its example do stands for do itself:

Quinn failed to do the homework, but her brother did it.

For verbs other than do, MGMAT prefers to repeat that verb again:

Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.

MGMAT prefers to do so because in some cases using do it for other verbs may create ambiguity:

The police have significantly reduced violent crime and are pleased with themselves for doing it.

Here it clearly refers to violent crime. However, doing is ambiguous because it may stand for reducing or just mean doing, as is. In the first case we have pleased with themselves for reducing (doing) violent crime (it). Makes sense if a person reading this sentence somehow already knows what the author is going to say.

But in the second case we have pleased with themselves for doing violent crime (it). That’s nonsense because original meaning is - police didn’t do violent crime but reduced it. A person who reads the above sentence for the first time most probably will understand it this way. By using do so instead, we can avoid this ambiguity.

Small conclusion: In everyday life, I think D would be just fine. However, for the sake of clarity and GMAT’s high standards, we better do what MGMAT does – to repeat the exact verb + it instead of do + it:

Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.

Just wanted to share my findings, your comments are welcome. :)
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I have posted the official explanation HERE
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Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2019, 01:42
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JonShukhrat wrote:
zhanbo wrote:
Though, regarding your comment that 'If we take "historical importance" as its referent then the sentence becomes "even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance"', I have a different idea: do can stand for verb "argue", so the sentence becomes
- even though many critics have attempted to argue his historical importance.
That sounds pretty good, doesn't it?


Hi zhanbo,

Above all, congratulations on such great achievements in both GMAT and GRE! :thumbup:

It’s kind of interesting that, right from the start, I knew do so is what we are tested on here. However, your question made me think about the exact reasons for eliminating D. So, I did some research, and let me share what I inferred from it. We know that do it doesn’t work when it doesn’t have clear referent (noun), for example:

I wanted them to leave, and politely asked them to do it/so.

Here, there is no noun for it to refer to, so we definitely need so. However, as you pointed out, in D it can refer to Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist (when it stands for a noun to which essential mods are attached, it must stand for the noun + all essential mods). Additionally, in D do can stand in for deny. As a result we have:

D. FB’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do (deny) it (FB’s historical importance as a novelist).

Quite a legitimate sentence, isn’t it? What I have found out is that out of do so/ it/ that the first one is the most academic and the least ambiguous one. i.e. in colloquial English, when someone asks us “Send them a fax!”, we are used to answer “I’ll do so”, “I’ll do it” or even “I’ll do that”.
But the latter two seem to be too informal for GMAT.

JonShukhrat , you have stated the issue very diplomatically.
Now, let me be the bad cop because there is no SEEM on the GMAT.
Those two constructions do not seem to be too informal for the GMAT.
Those two constructions ARE too informal on the GMAT.
In fact, in this question neither is grammatical.
I do not recall a single question in which the correct answer contained do it, a fact that confirms what Ron P says below.

Quote:
RonPurewal says: 'do it' is not always wrong. However, our research has shown that very few GMAT problems, if any, contain 'do it' in their correct forms, whereas 'do so' has been the crux of several problems. Remember, it's not just the correct grammar that matters - it also matters how likely it is that each particular concept will show up on the test.


DO SO and DO are possible.
DO IT is not at all likely.
DO THAT is never correct.

Quote:
Although MGMAT provides an example for do it, in its example do stands for do itself:
Quinn failed to do the homework, but her brother did it.

Nice catch.
In other words, the only time that we can use DO + PRONOUN is when we have already used a TO DO verb.
The pronoun takes the place of the object of the verb (the object that was a noun).

Quote:
For verbs other than do, MGMAT prefers to repeat that verb again [OR TO USE THE PHRASE DO SO, or perhaps just the word DO):

Quote:
Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.


MGMAT prefers to do so because in some cases using do it for other verbs may create ambiguity:
The police have significantly reduced violent crime and are pleased with themselves for doing it.

Here it clearly refers to violent crime. However, doing is ambiguous because it may stand for reducing or just mean doing, as is. In the first case we have pleased with themselves for reducing (doing) violent crime (it). Makes sense if a person reading this sentence somehow already knows what the author is going to say.

But in the second case we have pleased with themselves for doing violent crime (it). That’s nonsense because original meaning is - police didn’t do violent crime but reduced it. A person who reads the above sentence for the first time most probably will understand it this way. By using do so instead, we can avoid this ambiguity.

Small conclusion: In everyday life, I think D would be just fine. However, for the sake of clarity and GMAT’s high standards, we better do what MGMAT does – to repeat the exact verb + it instead of do + it:

Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.

Just wanted to share my findings, your comments are welcome. :)

Small conclusion: In everyday life, I think D would be just fine.

JonShukhrat — Bravo.
This analysis is very good.

I refined just a little bit of what you wrote. Your work is excellent.
Well done.
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2019, 06:05
generis wrote:
JonShukhrat wrote:
zhanbo wrote:
Though, regarding your comment that 'If we take "historical importance" as its referent then the sentence becomes "even though many critics have attempted to do historical importance"', I have a different idea: do can stand for verb "argue", so the sentence becomes
- even though many critics have attempted to argue his historical importance.
That sounds pretty good, doesn't it?


Hi zhanbo,

Above all, congratulations on such great achievements in both GMAT and GRE! :thumbup:

It’s kind of interesting that, right from the start, I knew do so is what we are tested on here. However, your question made me think about the exact reasons for eliminating D. So, I did some research, and let me share what I inferred from it. We know that do it doesn’t work when it doesn’t have clear referent (noun), for example:

I wanted them to leave, and politely asked them to do it/so.

Here, there is no noun for it to refer to, so we definitely need so. However, as you pointed out, in D it can refer to Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist (when it stands for a noun to which essential mods are attached, it must stand for the noun + all essential mods). Additionally, in D do can stand in for deny. As a result we have:

D. FB’s historical importance as a novelist cannot be denied, even though many critics have attempted to do (deny) it (FB’s historical importance as a novelist).

Quite a legitimate sentence, isn’t it? What I have found out is that out of do so/ it/ that the first one is the most academic and the least ambiguous one. i.e. in colloquial English, when someone asks us “Send them a fax!”, we are used to answer “I’ll do so”, “I’ll do it” or even “I’ll do that”.
But the latter two seem to be too informal for GMAT.

JonShukhrat , you have stated the issue very diplomatically.
Now, let me be the bad cop because there is no SEEM on the GMAT.
Those two constructions do not seem to be too informal for the GMAT.
Those two constructions ARE too informal on the GMAT.
In fact, in this question neither is grammatical.
I do not recall a single question in which the correct answer contained do it, a fact that confirms what Ron P says below.

Quote:
RonPurewal says: 'do it' is not always wrong. However, our research has shown that very few GMAT problems, if any, contain 'do it' in their correct forms, whereas 'do so' has been the crux of several problems. Remember, it's not just the correct grammar that matters - it also matters how likely it is that each particular concept will show up on the test.


DO SO and DO are possible.
DO IT is not at all likely.
DO THAT is never correct.

Quote:
Although MGMAT provides an example for do it, in its example do stands for do itself:
Quinn failed to do the homework, but her brother did it.

Nice catch.
In other words, the only time that we can use DO + PRONOUN is when we have already used a TO DO verb.
The pronoun takes the place of the object of the verb (the object that was a noun).

Quote:
For verbs other than do, MGMAT prefers to repeat that verb again [OR TO USE THE PHRASE DO SO, or perhaps just the word DO):

Quote:
Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.


MGMAT prefers to do so because in some cases using do it for other verbs may create ambiguity:
The police have significantly reduced violent crime and are pleased with themselves for doing it.

Here it clearly refers to violent crime. However, doing is ambiguous because it may stand for reducing or just mean doing, as is. In the first case we have pleased with themselves for reducing (doing) violent crime (it). Makes sense if a person reading this sentence somehow already knows what the author is going to say.

But in the second case we have pleased with themselves for doing violent crime (it). That’s nonsense because original meaning is - police didn’t do violent crime but reduced it. A person who reads the above sentence for the first time most probably will understand it this way. By using do so instead, we can avoid this ambiguity.

Small conclusion: In everyday life, I think D would be just fine. However, for the sake of clarity and GMAT’s high standards, we better do what MGMAT does – to repeat the exact verb + it instead of do + it:

Quinn did not eat the soup, but her brother ate it.

Just wanted to share my findings, your comments are welcome. :)

Small conclusion: In everyday life, I think D would be just fine.

JonShukhrat — Bravo.
This analysis is very good.

I refined just a little bit of what you wrote. Your work is excellent.
Well done.


Dear generis,

Thank you very much. You are awesome, as always :)
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Re: Fanny Burney’s historical importance as a novelist is undeniable, e   [#permalink] 23 Oct 2019, 06:05
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