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GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude

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GMAT 1: 670 Q46 V36
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GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 03 Dec 2019, 05:43
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GMAT 670 to 710 in just 15 days :)

And that is how the promotional posts go ;)

First things first, this is not a promotion for sure. I self-prepared i.e. no online course (well, almost !) for the test and if there is anything that contributed to my score and deserves thanks, it is this forum. This is just my small attempt to repay GMAT club – for all the resources and inspiration it provided during the journey.

My score is humble, but my learning is immense and valuable. Call it over confidence or faith, I had written this debrief on 30 September 2019, even before I enrolled for GMAT. I appeared for GMAT on 09 Nov 2019 and scored 670 (V36, Q46, IR6, AWA 5.0). Of course, that was not a score for which I had written my debrief in advance. One look at the ESR (attached), and I knew that I had screwed CR and that this is certainly not the score I should settle for. I enrolled again for 28 Nov and focused on CR only in the mean time– out of the 150 odd questions I solved from OGs, barely 5-7 were incorrect. I could not understand what went wrong on test day if I am conceptually ok with CR. I took the test again today, and although I have improved my score by 40 points, to my shock and disbelief, majority of it came from Quant with Verbal still hovering at 37. (I am still double minded about doing a postmortem by ordering ESR again :roll: )

For anyone wanting to avoid reading my entire story, here are the quick take-aways:
1. Verbal is the tougher part of test. It is the TOUGHEST part of test. No matter how good you think you are at it. There is a reason that people who score 51 in Quant struggle to get 40 in Verbal. So focus on V from Day 1.
2. There is no ‘one plan fits all’ approach for GMAT. Please take the pain of drafting your own study plan rather than downloading someone else’s. You know best how much time you need for which topic.
3. While you are preparing, have a clear vision of your goal and preparation levels in your head. Be consciously aware of various phases of study – getting to know the test well, understanding all concepts, subsequent practice, identifying areas that are still weak, error log analysis and final refinement. In between study, take a day or two off to introspect – see what is working what isn’t. Trust me, it pays.
4. Almost every debrief tells you about the importance of maintaining error log. Well guess what, they are all right  It is an inevitable tool. And again, have your own format and capture mistakes in your own style. For me, my error logs told me I had issues with past perfect tense and comparisons. I was actually totally unaware that those were my weak areas and that I was repeatedly doing the same mistakes until I started maintaining error log.
5. GMAT is a game of nerves. Study hard but make sure you stay cheerful and relaxed during preparation. Those memories stick to your mind and your mind behaves exactly in same fashion on test day.

My debrief is actually not very brief :blushing I shall be writing a separate post elaborating on these points linking them with my experience and listing the resources I used. I shall be using the same colour scheme to convey each point.

Cheers
Rachna

Pls see this post for ESR of 710 score:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-710-v37 ... l#p2416640
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File comment: Unofficial score - 710
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Rachna Khanduja_364247729_ESR.pdf [490.17 KiB]
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Originally posted by Rachna23 on 28 Nov 2019, 10:03.
Last edited by Rachna23 on 03 Dec 2019, 05:43, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2019, 11:08
Rachna23 wrote:


I self-prepared i.e. no online course (well, almost !) for the test and if there is anything that contributed to my score and deserves thanks, it is this forum. This is just my small attempt to repay GMAT club – for all the resources and inspiration it provided during the journey.

My score is humble, but my learning is immense and valuable. Call it over confidence or faith, I had written this debrief on 30 September 2019, even before I enrolled for GMAT. I appeared for GMAT on 09 Nov 2019 and scored 670 (V36, Q46, IR6, AWA 5.0). Of course, that was not a score for which I had written my debrief in advance. One look at the ESR (attached), and I knew that I had screwed CR and that this is certainly not the score I should settle for. I enrolled again for 28 Nov and focused on CR only in the mean time– out of the 150 odd questions I solved from OGs, barely 5-7 were incorrect. I could not understand what went wrong on test day if I am conceptually ok with CR. I took the test again today, and although I have improved my score by 40 points, to my shock and disbelief, majority of it came from Quant with Verbal still hovering at 37. (I am still double minded about doing a postmortem by ordering ESR again :roll: )

For anyone wanting to avoid reading my entire story, here are the quick take-aways:
1. Verbal is the tougher part of test. It is the TOUGHEST part of test. No matter how good you think you are at it. There is a reason that people who score 51 in Quant struggle to get 40 in Verbal. So focus on V from Day 1.
2. There is no ‘one plan fits all’ approach for GMAT. Please take the pain of drafting your own study plan rather than downloading someone else’s. You know best how much time you need for which topic.
3. While you are preparing, have a clear vision of your goal and preparation levels in your head. Be consciously aware of various phases of study – getting to know the test well, understanding all concepts, subsequent practice, identifying areas that are still weak, error log analysis and final refinement. In between study, take a day or two off to introspect – see what is working what isn’t. Trust me, it pays.
4. Almost every debrief tells you about the importance of maintaining error log. Well guess what, they are all right  It is an inevitable tool. And again, have your own format and capture mistakes in your own style. For me, my error logs told me I had issues with past perfect tense and comparisons. I was actually totally unaware that those were my weak areas and that I was repeatedly doing the same mistakes until I started maintaining error log.
5. GMAT is a game of nerves. Study hard but make sure you stay cheerful and relaxed during preparation. Those memories stick to your mind and your mind behaves exactly in same fashion on test day.



Nice score improvement with self-preparation. Thanks for sharing your experiences for the benefit of the people here.

I will echo and add to some of your points, so that they may be of help to others.

1. Verbal will indeed be quite tough. It will preparation from the very beginning as verbal skills are slow to build over time. The OG and other official questions are the best practice materials available in terms of actually learning to apply principles.

2. Absolutely. Testtakers should develop their own plans of study that suits them. They should be prepared to modify their plans as needed. Copying from others will rarely work on these types of tests. Every testtaker has their own strengths and weaknesses in different areas. These need to be individually addressed.

3. Having clear goals will help. However, note that goals will develop over time and may need modifications later. The goals should address each area of preparation. Taking breaks is essential to preparation. The type of breaks will also matter.

4. Error logs, whether in formal or informal forms, are helpful. However, if they become a chore to maintain and take significant time away from preparation, then it may be helpful to develop new forms of record keeping.

5. The mind can play tricks and bad study habits can become difficult to remove. Good study habits developed over time will prove very helpful when test date draws near.

Testtakers should also not underestimate the quantitative section. Although it is relatively easier to do well on this section, getting high scores under test conditions is quite challenging. So, preparation should take into account overall aspects of the test.

Congrats on the good score and keep learning!
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Joined: 15 Feb 2017
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GMAT 1: 670 Q46 V36
GMAT 2: 710 Q49 V37
Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2019, 16:05
Thanks a lot for adding feedback. Yes, rightly said, error logs must be used wisely and judiciously.

Cheers!

Hovkial wrote:
Rachna23 wrote:


I self-prepared i.e. no online course (well, almost !) for the test and if there is anything that contributed to my score and deserves thanks, it is this forum. This is just my small attempt to repay GMAT club – for all the resources and inspiration it provided during the journey.

My score is humble, but my learning is immense and valuable. Call it over confidence or faith, I had written this debrief on 30 September 2019, even before I enrolled for GMAT. I appeared for GMAT on 09 Nov 2019 and scored 670 (V36, Q46, IR6, AWA 5.0). Of course, that was not a score for which I had written my debrief in advance. One look at the ESR (attached), and I knew that I had screwed CR and that this is certainly not the score I should settle for. I enrolled again for 28 Nov and focused on CR only in the mean time– out of the 150 odd questions I solved from OGs, barely 5-7 were incorrect. I could not understand what went wrong on test day if I am conceptually ok with CR. I took the test again today, and although I have improved my score by 40 points, to my shock and disbelief, majority of it came from Quant with Verbal still hovering at 37. (I am still double minded about doing a postmortem by ordering ESR again :roll: )

For anyone wanting to avoid reading my entire story, here are the quick take-aways:
1. Verbal is the tougher part of test. It is the TOUGHEST part of test. No matter how good you think you are at it. There is a reason that people who score 51 in Quant struggle to get 40 in Verbal. So focus on V from Day 1.
2. There is no ‘one plan fits all’ approach for GMAT. Please take the pain of drafting your own study plan rather than downloading someone else’s. You know best how much time you need for which topic.
3. While you are preparing, have a clear vision of your goal and preparation levels in your head. Be consciously aware of various phases of study – getting to know the test well, understanding all concepts, subsequent practice, identifying areas that are still weak, error log analysis and final refinement. In between study, take a day or two off to introspect – see what is working what isn’t. Trust me, it pays.
4. Almost every debrief tells you about the importance of maintaining error log. Well guess what, they are all right  It is an inevitable tool. And again, have your own format and capture mistakes in your own style. For me, my error logs told me I had issues with past perfect tense and comparisons. I was actually totally unaware that those were my weak areas and that I was repeatedly doing the same mistakes until I started maintaining error log.
5. GMAT is a game of nerves. Study hard but make sure you stay cheerful and relaxed during preparation. Those memories stick to your mind and your mind behaves exactly in same fashion on test day.



Nice score improvement with self-preparation. Thanks for sharing your experiences for the benefit of the people here.

I will echo and add to some of your points, so that they may be of help to others.

1. Verbal will indeed be quite tough. It will preparation from the very beginning as verbal skills are slow to build over time. The OG and other official questions are the best practice materials available in terms of actually learning to apply principles.

2. Absolutely. Testtakers should develop their own plans of study that suits them. They should be prepared to modify their plans as needed. Copying from others will rarely work on these types of tests. Every testtaker has their own strengths and weaknesses in different areas. These need to be individually addressed.

3. Having clear goals will help. However, note that goals will develop over time and may need modifications later. The goals should address each area of preparation. Taking breaks is essential to preparation. The type of breaks will also matter.

4. Error logs, whether in formal or informal forms, are helpful. However, if they become a chore to maintain and take significant time away from preparation, then it may be helpful to develop new forms of record keeping.

5. The mind can play tricks and bad study habits can become difficult to remove. Good study habits developed over time will prove very helpful when test date draws near.

Testtakers should also not underestimate the quantitative section. Although it is relatively easier to do well on this section, getting high scores under test conditions is quite challenging. So, preparation should take into account overall aspects of the test.

Congrats on the good score and keep learning!
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2019, 10:02
I wouldn't say that verbal is the harder part, it is more about how you are wired genetically. If you have a strong background in quant or in general always had an easy time with maths, do the hard work and focus on a study split in favour of verbal.

To me though, verbal comes a lot easier then quant and therefore I spent way more time in improving quant than I did on verbal. What I have to assert on top of that is, that quant is in my opinion way 'easier' than verbal. You can improve relatively quickly in SC but RC and CR won't come as fast if you are not familiar with the english language.
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2019, 05:10
That is why I am calling V the toughest - scoring is the ultimate criteria against which to evaluate IMO. Quant is my weak are, and I could improve substantially on it with practice (read from 41 to 49). Improving scores on V beyond a point is tough.

chrtpmdr wrote:
I wouldn't say that verbal is the harder part, it is more about how you are wired genetically. If you have a strong background in quant or in general always had an easy time with maths, do the hard work and focus on a study split in favour of verbal.

To me though, verbal comes a lot easier then quant and therefore I spent way more time in improving quant than I did on verbal. What I have to assert on top of that is, that quant is in my opinion way 'easier' than verbal. You can improve relatively quickly in SC but RC and CR won't come as fast if you are not familiar with the english language.
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2019, 05:38
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I finally ordered my ESR for the latest attempt. Attaching for everyone's reference.

I see I my CR stands at 80% now (up from 20% in my earlier attempt 15 days ago), but SC and RC have come down keeping the overall score just at 37. Also, would like to share that the RC passages I got this time were a lot harder - probably because I improved on CR and the first few questions were attempted correctly. This time I had changed the order of sections and attempted Q first. I was really doubtful of my Q performance as some of the questions were quite difficult and I could not complete the test. The fear of penalty for not completing the test really weighed me down but I tried to relax myself during the breaks.

Also, imo my Quant score has a lot to do with the first few being 100% correct. I performed well at the beginning and at the end of test in Q (as totally opposed to the V section) - though this was not a deliberate attempt. In the end, I ran short of time and one question (which was fairly easy and that prompted me try to solve it within 30 odd seconds left with me) was left unmarked which is perhaps reflecting as wrong in ESR.

Hope this helps everyone !
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2019, 08:12
Rachna23 wrote:
That is why I am calling V the toughest - scoring is the ultimate criteria against which to evaluate IMO. Quant is my weak are, and I could improve substantially on it with practice (read from 41 to 49). Improving scores on V beyond a point is tough.

chrtpmdr wrote:
I wouldn't say that verbal is the harder part, it is more about how you are wired genetically. If you have a strong background in quant or in general always had an easy time with maths, do the hard work and focus on a study split in favour of verbal.

To me though, verbal comes a lot easier then quant and therefore I spent way more time in improving quant than I did on verbal. What I have to assert on top of that is, that quant is in my opinion way 'easier' than verbal. You can improve relatively quickly in SC but RC and CR won't come as fast if you are not familiar with the english language.


Yeah my post was a bit ambigous ... I did not want to say Quant is easier, I wanted to say improvement in quant comes easier.
If you are bad in geometry - fine - do problems everyday and even though you wont become a expert, you should get a good chunk of the questions right.

The studying is more mechanical, whereas if you have a weakness in english in general I would tend to say it's nearly game over for 700+ ambitions in at least somewhat short timeframe of a couple of months.
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2019, 03:43
Rachna23 wrote:
Also, would like to share that the RC passages I got this time were a lot harder - probably because I improved on CR and the first few questions were attempted correctly.

Hi Rachna, it doesn't happen that way. Just because you attempt first few CR questions correct, would not mean that the first RC passage would be of a higher difficulty.

Perhaps the topic/theme of the RC passages was just more unfamiliar to you, than it was the last time around.
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Re: GMAT 710 (V37, Q49) – Gratitude   [#permalink] 09 Dec 2019, 03:43
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