GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 16 Dec 2018, 07:33

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     03:00 PM EST

     04:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics
  • FREE Quant Workshop by e-GMAT!

     December 16, 2018

     December 16, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Get personalized insights on how to achieve your Target Quant Score.

Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2014
Posts: 1235
Location: Ukraine
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Technology
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V33
GMAT 2: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2015, 23:01
1
5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

68% (00:54) correct 32% (01:02) wrong based on 409 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target houses that appear unoccupied. Therefore, when homeowners are away from their homes for several days, we recommend that they leave lights on, to give the impression that the house is occupied.
Crime Expert: The same lights continuously on all night long with no change give a potential burglar a clear signal that the house is unoccupied.

The Crime Expert uses which of the following techniques in responding to the Homeowner Representative?

A) calling into question an unstated assumption
B) pointing out an undesired effect of a recommendation
C) presenting new evidence that calls the conclusion into question
D) explaining that a reputed effect is actually a cause
E) demonstrating that the conclusion is true, but not for the reasons cited

_________________

Simple way to always control time during the quant part.
How to solve main idea questions without full understanding of RC.
660 (Q48, V33) - unpleasant surprise
740 (Q50, V40, IR3) - anti-debrief ;)

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2015, 09:48
3
1
Harley1980 wrote:
Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target houses that appear unoccupied. Therefore, when homeowners are away from their homes for several days, we recommend that they leave lights on, to give the impression that the house is occupied.
Crime Expert: The same lights continuously on all night long with no change give a potential burglar a clear signal that the house is unoccupied.

The Crime Expert uses which of the following techniques in responding to the Homeowner Representative?

A) calling into question an unstated assumption
B) pointing out an undesired effect of a recommendation
C) presenting new evidence that calls the conclusion into question
D) explaining that a reputed effect is actually a cause
E) demonstrating that the conclusion is true, but not for the reasons cited

Dear Harley1980,
I'm happy to respond. :-) As usual, it warms the cockles of my heart to see a question I wrote posted here on GC. :-)

So, this is an interesting one. The homeowner person first states the fact, the evidence that burglars target houses that appear unoccupied. Then, the homeowner person suggests a plan of action, leaving the lights on, which this person thinks will convince burglars that the house in unoccupied.

The crime expert doesn't introduce any new evidence, because evidence is an objective fact to which everyone would agree. He gives his interpretation of how a burglar would respond to a house with lights continuous on, and in his interpretation, there is an undesirable effect of this action.

There's no unstated assumption pointed out, so (A) is not right at all.
There's no confusion of cause & effect, so (D) is not right at all.
The two people don't agree, so (E) is not right at all.

The tricky trap answer is (C). You see, what the Crime Expert says does not count as "evidence" in GMAT terms. Evidence is something we all could read in the newspaper or look up in a reference book, an objective fact on which there is general agreement. Now, what the Crime Expert said could be objective true. Maybe if we went out and surveyed thousands of burglars ("Excuse me, sir, are you a burglar? I have a few survey questions to as you."), then we could gather objective evidence and call this position a fact. There is no attempt, in the course of the prompt argument, to advance such claims. The crime expert is giving us his opinion. Now, this is an opinion informed by his years of experience in the field, so it much more valuable and weighty than the opinion of a non-expert. Nevertheless, it fails short of the high mark that the GMAT holds for "evidence."

This leaves the OA, (B), which hits the nail on the head.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 23 Sep 2015
Posts: 1561
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Aug 2018, 06:40

Official Explanation


The homeowner representative recommends leaving the lights of an empty house on as way to prevent crime. The crime expert points out that leaving the lights on like this will invite crime.

The credited answer is (B). Giving potential criminal information about who is on vacation would be an unintended and undesirable effect of the homeowner representative's recommendation.

The homeowner representative explicitly states that he thinks keeping lights on will make would-be burglars assume someone is home, so that's not a "unstated" assumption. This is why (A) is incorrect.

What the crime expert is pointing out may be an interpretation or an argument, but it's not really evidence. Evidence would be some unambiguously agreed upon fact. This is why (C) is incorrect.

In this question, leaving the lights on causes various interpretations; clearly, the interpretations of would-be burglars don't cause the lights to go on. This is why (D) is incorrect.

The crime expert does not agree that the homeowner representative's conclusion is true. This is why (E) is incorrect.
_________________

Thanks!
Do give some kudos.

Simple strategy:
“Once you’ve eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Want to improve your Score:
GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 1| GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 2 | How to Improve GMAT Quant from Q49 to a Perfect Q51

My Notes:
Reading comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Absolute Phrases | Subjunctive Mood

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Mar 2017
Posts: 4
CAT Tests
Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Nov 2018, 23:47
Home owner representative recommendation : leave lights on to avoid possible vulgary

Crime expert : leave lights on can also give impression that the house is unoccupied if undisturbed for prolonged time

A- leaving lights on would give an impression that the house is occupied and will ward off potential vulgary is a stated assumption.
B- leaving light on to avoid potential vulgary may work if burglar thinks the house is occupied, but it may not work if burglar thinks the house is not occupied because the light has been on undisturbed

Crime expert talks about the potential drawbacks of the recommendation
B is correct

I hope my explanation helps!
Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 20
Location: India
Schools: Yale '19, GMBA '20, XLRI
GMAT 1: 660 Q46 V35
GPA: 3.8
Re: Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2018, 00:29
A) calling into question an unstated assumption - the crime expert attacks what is explicitly stated
B) pointing out an undesired effect of a recommendation - CORRECT : desired effect is a burglar getting a clear signal.
C) presenting new evidence that calls the conclusion into question - no new evidence
D) explaining that a reputed effect is actually a cause - burglary is not a cause
E) demonstrating that the conclusion is true, but not for the reasons cited- irrelevant
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target &nbs [#permalink] 08 Dec 2018, 00:29
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Homeowner Representative: Statistics show that burglars often target

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.