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How to dissect dense RC passages

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How to dissect dense RC passages  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2018, 01:24
1
Dear Experts,

I guess everyone would be familiar with the below passage from GMAT Prep1 test.

{{{
When a large body strikes a planet or moon, material is ejected, thereby creating a hole in the planet and a local deficit of mass. This deficit shows up as a gravity anomaly: the removal of the material that has been ejected to make the hole results in an area of slightly lower gravity than surrounding areas. One would therefore expect that all of the large multi-ring impact basins on the surface of Earth’s Moon would show such negative gravity anomalies, since they are, essentially, large holes in the lunar surface. Yet data collected in 1994 by the Clementine spacecraft show that many of these lunar basins have no anomalously low gravity and some even have anomalously high gravity. Scientists speculate that early in lunar history, when large impactors struck the Moon’s surface, causing millions of cubic kilometers of crustal debris to be ejected, denser material from the Moon’s mantle rose up beneath the impactors almost immediately, compensating for the ejected material and thus leaving no low gravity anomaly in the resulting basin. Later, however, as the Moon grew cooler and less elastic, rebound from large impactors would have been only partial and incomplete. Thus today such gravitational compensation probably would not occur: the outer layer of the Moon is too cold and stiff.
}}}

When there is a dense passage of this kind is presented, how to dissect the passage?

Your valuable suggestions would be much appreciated.

Regards,
Karthik
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How to dissect dense RC passages  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2018, 05:19
KarthikvsGMAT wrote:
Dear Experts,

I guess everyone would be familiar with the below passage from GMAT Prep1 test.

{{{
When a large body strikes a planet or moon, material is ejected, thereby creating a hole in the planet and a local deficit of mass. This deficit shows up as a gravity anomaly: the removal of the material that has been ejected to make the hole results in an area of slightly lower gravity than surrounding areas. One would therefore expect that all of the large multi-ring impact basins on the surface of Earth’s Moon would show such negative gravity anomalies, since they are, essentially, large holes in the lunar surface. Yet data collected in 1994 by the Clementine spacecraft show that many of these lunar basins have no anomalously low gravity and some even have anomalously high gravity. Scientists speculate that early in lunar history, when large impactors struck the Moon’s surface, causing millions of cubic kilometers of crustal debris to be ejected, denser material from the Moon’s mantle rose up beneath the impactors almost immediately, compensating for the ejected material and thus leaving no low gravity anomaly in the resulting basin. Later, however, as the Moon grew cooler and less elastic, rebound from large impactors would have been only partial and incomplete. Thus today such gravitational compensation probably would not occur: the outer layer of the Moon is too cold and stiff.
}}}


When there is a dense passage of this kind is presented, how to dissect the passage?

Your valuable suggestions would be much appreciated.

Regards,
Karthik


Hi
There are many techniques out there and each technique may not suit all.
You can choose the one that suits you.
Refer the following post:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-club-rc ... 64834.html
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Re: How to dissect dense RC passages  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2018, 10:25
Hi Karthik,

While certain RC passages can be longer or involve more difficult content, the 'process' for dealing with RC does not change. You have to read 'actively' and take the proper notes - and certain questions will require that you go back to 'hunt down' information in the prompt. You do NOT need to be a 'fast reader' and you do NOT need to understand every word that you read though.

Since you're interested in knowing how other Test Takers might handle this prompt, it would help to know how YOU handled it the first time you read it - as well as how you've been studying overall and your goals:

Studies:
1) How long have you studied?
2) What study materials have you used so far? What materials/Tactics have you used to train for RC?
3) How have you scored on EACH of your CATs (including the Quant and Verbal Scaled Scores for EACH)?

Goals:
4) What is your goal score?
5) When are you planning to take the GMAT?
6) When are you planning to apply to Business School?
7) What Schools are you planning to apply to?

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Re: How to dissect dense RC passages  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2018, 12:23
1
Top Contributor
1
KarthikvsGMAT wrote:
Dear Experts,

I guess everyone would be familiar with the below passage from GMAT Prep1 test.

{{{
When a large body strikes a planet or moon, material is ejected, thereby creating a hole in the planet and a local deficit of mass. This deficit shows up as a gravity anomaly: the removal of the material that has been ejected to make the hole results in an area of slightly lower gravity than surrounding areas. One would therefore expect that all of the large multi-ring impact basins on the surface of Earth’s Moon would show such negative gravity anomalies, since they are, essentially, large holes in the lunar surface. Yet data collected in 1994 by the Clementine spacecraft show that many of these lunar basins have no anomalously low gravity and some even have anomalously high gravity. Scientists speculate that early in lunar history, when large impactors struck the Moon’s surface, causing millions of cubic kilometers of crustal debris to be ejected, denser material from the Moon’s mantle rose up beneath the impactors almost immediately, compensating for the ejected material and thus leaving no low gravity anomaly in the resulting basin. Later, however, as the Moon grew cooler and less elastic, rebound from large impactors would have been only partial and incomplete. Thus today such gravitational compensation probably would not occur: the outer layer of the Moon is too cold and stiff.
}}}



Easy translation of the above into 2 or 3 sentences. :

When some space collision happens....some hole is created, reducing the strength of gravity near that region. Because of this, one would expect [X], but actually data from 1994 shows [Y]. Some further details, etc.

Keyword THUS --- basically saying what happened in the past probably wouldn't happen in today's conditions because the Moon is too cold now. So this above example is just an edge case (doesn't happen often).


How's that?

For RC - the best way to improve is to practice.

I highly recommend Harvard Magazine articles? Why? Because they have a lot of short articles - that are very similar to what you might see on the GMAT exam -- usually 4-6 paragraphs citing some kind of social or science research.

Favorite this:
https://harvardmagazine.com/topic/Research

Image

Look for where it says: "Select a topic:" - Humanities, Social Science, Science, International

Go to the above link and read some of the articles.You'll see these are almost the exact topics you will see on the actual GMAT exam.

Here's one example:

https://harvardmagazine.com/2018/02/how ... lationship

Are you able to quickly read through it - ideally without reading every word - and identify WHO is writing it and WHY they are writing it - WHAT's the whole point to the author spending time to write these passages?

These are great for RC comprehension - with practice, time management becomes a non-issue.

This is what we recommend for our students!

See if this video helps: http://www.gmatpill.com/readingcomprehension/intro.mp4

Image

You can also get more RC Practice with our online question bank:

http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... questions/

---and the best material for RC is saved for our RC Pill course where we actually walk through dozens of RC passages showing you where to read and where not to read.

Just look for "Vishal" under the "Verbal Improvement" tab of

http://www.gmatpill.com/testimonials

-- read his story (and video) about RC improvement.
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Re: How to dissect dense RC passages  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2018, 07:42
GMATPill wrote:
KarthikvsGMAT wrote:
Dear Experts,

I guess everyone would be familiar with the below passage from GMAT Prep1 test.

{{{
When a large body strikes a planet or moon, material is ejected, thereby creating a hole in the planet and a local deficit of mass. This deficit shows up as a gravity anomaly: the removal of the material that has been ejected to make the hole results in an area of slightly lower gravity than surrounding areas. One would therefore expect that all of the large multi-ring impact basins on the surface of Earth’s Moon would show such negative gravity anomalies, since they are, essentially, large holes in the lunar surface. Yet data collected in 1994 by the Clementine spacecraft show that many of these lunar basins have no anomalously low gravity and some even have anomalously high gravity. Scientists speculate that early in lunar history, when large impactors struck the Moon’s surface, causing millions of cubic kilometers of crustal debris to be ejected, denser material from the Moon’s mantle rose up beneath the impactors almost immediately, compensating for the ejected material and thus leaving no low gravity anomaly in the resulting basin. Later, however, as the Moon grew cooler and less elastic, rebound from large impactors would have been only partial and incomplete. Thus today such gravitational compensation probably would not occur: the outer layer of the Moon is too cold and stiff.
}}}



Easy translation of the above into 2 or 3 sentences. :

When some space collision happens....some hole is created, reducing the strength of gravity near that region. Because of this, one would expect [X], but actually data from 1994 shows [Y]. Some further details, etc.

Keyword THUS --- basically saying what happened in the past probably wouldn't happen in today's conditions because the Moon is too cold now. So this above example is just an edge case (doesn't happen often).


How's that?

For RC - the best way to improve is to practice.

I highly recommend Harvard Magazine articles? Why? Because they have a lot of short articles - that are very similar to what you might see on the GMAT exam -- usually 4-6 paragraphs citing some kind of social or science research.

Favorite this:
https://harvardmagazine.com/topic/Research

Image

Look for where it says: "Select a topic:" - Humanities, Social Science, Science, International

Go to the above link and read some of the articles.You'll see these are almost the exact topics you will see on the actual GMAT exam.

Here's one example:

https://harvardmagazine.com/2018/02/how ... lationship

Are you able to quickly read through it - ideally without reading every word - and identify WHO is writing it and WHY they are writing it - WHAT's the whole point to the author spending time to write these passages?

These are great for RC comprehension - with practice, time management becomes a non-issue.

This is what we recommend for our students!

See if this video helps: http://www.gmatpill.com/readingcomprehension/intro.mp4

Image

You can also get more RC Practice with our online question bank:

http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... questions/

---and the best material for RC is saved for our RC Pill course where we actually walk through dozens of RC passages showing you where to read and where not to read.

Just look for "Vishal" under the "Verbal Improvement" tab of

http://www.gmatpill.com/testimonials

-- read his story (and video) about RC improvement.


Really thanks for these tips!!
GMAT Club Bot
Re: How to dissect dense RC passages &nbs [#permalink] 08 Sep 2018, 07:42
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