It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 04:08

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In a large residential building, there is a rule that no

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Nov 2008
Posts: 297

Kudos [?]: 244 [0], given: 7

In a large residential building, there is a rule that no [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jun 2009, 00:31
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (00:24) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

In a large residential building, there is a rule that no pets are allowed. A group of pet lovers tried to change that rule but failed. The rule-changing procedure outlined in the building’s regulations states that only if a group of tenants can obtain the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on a petition to change a rule will the proposed change be put to a majority vote of all the tenants in the building. It follows that the pet lovers were voted down on their proposal by the majority of the tenants.
The argument depends on which one of the following assumptions?
(A) The pet lovers succeeded in obtaining the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on their petition.
(B) The signatures of less than 10 percent of the tenants were obtained on the pet lovers’ petition.
(C) Ninety percent of the tenants are against changing the rule forbidding pets.
(D) The support of 10 percent of the tenants for a rule change ensures that the rule change will be adopted.
(E) The failure of the pet lovers to obtain the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on their petition for a rule change ensures that the rule change will be voted down by a majority of the tenants.
_________________

"CEO in making"

Kudos [?]: 244 [0], given: 7

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Jun 2009
Posts: 808

Kudos [?]: 373 [0], given: 106

WE 1: 7years (Financial Services - Consultant, BA)
Re: Rule - Residential Building . [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jun 2009, 01:09
A it is.
_________________

Consider kudos for the good post ... :beer
My debrief : http://gmatclub.com/forum/journey-670-to-720-q50-v36-long-85083.html

Kudos [?]: 373 [0], given: 106

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Apr 2007
Posts: 255

Kudos [?]: 93 [0], given: 1

Re: Rule - Residential Building . [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jun 2009, 11:39
I'll go for A....There was a majority vote...This denotes that the pet lovers succeeded in meeting the prerequisite, getting consent of 10 percent....
_________________

Choose Life

Kudos [?]: 93 [0], given: 1

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 May 2009
Posts: 168

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 3

Re: Rule - Residential Building . [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jun 2009, 17:13
tenaman10 wrote:
In a large residential building, there is a rule that no pets are allowed. A group of pet lovers tried to change that rule but failed. The rule-changing procedure outlined in the building’s regulations states that only if a group of tenants can obtain the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on a petition to change a rule will the proposed change be put to a majority vote of all the tenants in the building. It follows that the pet lovers were voted down on their proposal by the majority of the tenants.
The argument depends on which one of the following assumptions?
(A) The pet lovers succeeded in obtaining the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on their petition.
(B) The signatures of less than 10 percent of the tenants were obtained on the pet lovers’ petition.
(C) Ninety percent of the tenants are against changing the rule forbidding pets.
(D) The support of 10 percent of the tenants for a rule change ensures that the rule change will be adopted.
(E) The failure of the pet lovers to obtain the signatures of 10 percent of the tenants on their petition for a rule change ensures that the rule change will be voted down by a majority of the tenants.


I would go with (A). If the pet lovers' proposal was "voted down", then one would assume that a vote took place in the first place, since the act of signing the petition is not, in and of itself, the same as the act of voting. according to the rules, in order for a vote to take place, at least 10% of the tenants must have signed the petition. (A) must be true for the conclusion to be true.

(B) This is the reverse answer; the conclusion must be false if (B) is true.
(C) Not necessarily, only a simple majority is needed to vote down the proposal.
(D) This contradicts the given info.
(E) The conclusion must be false if (E) is true. No vote would've taken place at all.

Kudos [?]: 29 [0], given: 3

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 May 2009
Posts: 103

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Re: Rule - Residential Building . [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jun 2009, 16:32
It's A for me.

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 0

Re: Rule - Residential Building .   [#permalink] 27 Jun 2009, 16:32
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In a large residential building, there is a rule that no

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.