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Re: In criminal proceedings, defense attorneys occasionally attempt to est [#permalink]
"Although every person’s DNA is unique, DNA tests often fail to distinguish among DNA samples taken from distinct individuals." This is a flawed premise. How can a test result from same individual show distinction between the DNA samples that was collected? DNA will be always same for an individual and won't vary . Hence, this premise is incorrect.


(A) It assumes without warrant that the use of physical evidence in identifying suspects is never mistaken.
Physical evidence is always correct - this is not stated in the argument. Eliminate

(B) It confuses a test that incorrectly identifies DNA samples as coming from the same person with a test that incorrectly shows as coming from different persons samples that come from a single person.
This exactly reflects the analysis that the premise is flawed. Hence, B is the correct answer choice

(C) It generalizes about the reliability of all methods used to identify those involved in the commission of a crime on the basis of results that pertain to only a few such methods.
There was no generalization made in the argument. This is false statement and hence eliminate.

(D) It relies on experimental data derived from DNA testing that have not been shown to hold under nonexperimental conditions.
Experimental vs nonexperimental conditions is not discussed and not relevant to the argument. Eliminate


(E) It fails to demonstrate that physical evidence taken from the scene of a crime is the only sort of evidence that should be admitted in criminal court proceedings.
Physical evidence is never considered as the only sort of evidence, and is irrelevant to the argument. Eliminate
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Re: In criminal proceedings, defense attorneys occasionally attempt to est [#permalink]
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