GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Oct 2019, 16:47

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn

  post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58402
In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 07:09
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

27% (02:12) correct 73% (02:22) wrong based on 105 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Competition Mode Question



In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagnosed as completely blind through damage to their visual cortex retain the ability to make judgments and take actions that appear to require or demonstrate the use of sight, despite the fact that they consciously see nothing. Such an individual, if prompted, might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary. Individuals with blindsight are usually not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

Which of the following questions indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation described above?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence?

B. Why are they not surprised by these events?

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence?

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence?

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly?

_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Status: Whatever it takes!
Joined: 10 Oct 2018
Posts: 383
GPA: 4
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 07:38
1
Premise: Blindsight->completely blind - the ability to make judgments and take actions - that require eyesight.
Concusion: Individuals with blindsight -> not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

We need a question that indicates the weakness in the explanation described above- how coincidence in such incidents is even possible?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence? CORRECT! The sentence attacks the conclusion and the theory of coincidence.

B. Why are they not surprised by these events? This is not weakening.

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence? A contender. This question is not weakening. Plus these people attribute such events to coincidence.

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence? Out of scope

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly? Out of scope. Nothing regarding repetition of these events can weaken the conclusion. The question is trying to confuse you by changing the meaning of coincidence from the passage. Another strong contender though.
_________________
Kudos OK Please!!

ALL ABOUT GMAT- \(https://exampal.com/gmat/blog/gmat-score-explained\)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 01 Mar 2019
Posts: 8
CAT Tests
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 08:09
1
The question says the most serious weakness in the explanation described above, after reading the argument you can notice few thing:
1.the person is completely blind inferred from statement - diagnosed as completely blind
2.Even though he make some actions and decisions which need vision i.e use of sight
3. and then the examples are given about these persons that even though they are completely blind they might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary

So its clear that they are not functionally blind, therefore the question should be option D which says . If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence?
SVP
SVP
User avatar
P
Joined: 03 Jun 2019
Posts: 1699
Location: India
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 10:18
In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagnosed as completely blind through damage to their visual cortex retain the ability to make judgments and take actions that appear to require or demonstrate the use of sight, despite the fact that they consciously see nothing. Such an individual, if prompted, might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary. Individuals with blindsight are usually not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

Which of the following questions indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation described above?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence?

B. Why are they not surprised by these events?

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence?

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence?

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly?

E is correct since it indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation.
If it's coincidental, then why does happen repeatedly.
_________________
"Success is not final; failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts."

Please provide kudos if you like my post. Kudos encourage active discussions.

My GMAT Resources: -

Efficient Learning
All you need to know about GMAT quant

Tele: +91-11-40396815
Mobile : +91-9910661622
E-mail : kinshook.chaturvedi@gmail.com
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 07 Mar 2019
Posts: 323
Location: India
GMAT 1: 580 Q43 V27
WE: Sales (Energy and Utilities)
CAT Tests
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 10:34
In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagnosed as completely blind through damage to their visual cortex retain the ability to make judgments and take actions that appear to require or demonstrate the use of sight, despite the fact that they consciously see nothing. Such an individual, if prompted, might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary. Individuals with blindsight are usually not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

Argument brings an ambiguity in that a person completely blind through visual cortex still has the ability to judge and act which would normally require use of sight as if they are able to see but they don’t. But these individuals refer their surprising actions as coincidence. How’s that possible? What if they can see a little but that is not possible since argument says they are blind and can’t see? What if what they say as coincidence is actually not one?

Which of the following questions indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation described above?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence? – WRONG. Not concerned about people who are blind by birth.

B. Why are they not surprised by these events? – WRONG. This does raise valid question. We can keep it.

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence? – WRONG. Similar to point B above this raises question. We can keep it.

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence? – WRONG. Argument says its blindness so we can’t counter it by saying it is not functionally total blindness.

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly? – CORRECT. Coincidence can’t repeat itself and if it can then these people are hiding something? We don’t know but this does raise eyebrows.

Options B and C are wrong since more assumptions are to be made to prove them correct.

IMO Answer (E).
_________________
Ephemeral Epiphany..!

GMATPREP1 590(Q48,V23) March 6, 2019
GMATPREP2 610(Q44,V29) June 10, 2019
GMATPREPSoft1 680(Q48,V35) June 26, 2019
Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 17 Mar 2019
Posts: 41
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 10:45
In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagnosed as completely blind through damage to their visual cortex retain the ability to make judgments and take actions that appear to require or demonstrate the use of sight, despite the fact that they consciously see nothing. Such an individual, if prompted, might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary. Individuals with blindsight are usually not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

Which of the following questions indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation described above?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence? out of scope

B. Why are they not surprised by these events? doesnot weaken the conclusion. Questions the conclusion

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence? Irrelevant

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence? Irrelevant

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly. Weakens the conclusion that by stating if it was co-incidence then why would it occur repeatedly. Best option which weakens the conclusion

Weaken the conclusion that the Individuals in blind sight are able to find objects by co-incidence.
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58402
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Aug 2019, 08:27
Bunuel wrote:

Competition Mode Question



In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagnosed as completely blind through damage to their visual cortex retain the ability to make judgments and take actions that appear to require or demonstrate the use of sight, despite the fact that they consciously see nothing. Such an individual, if prompted, might catch a ball thrown to him, walk around obstacles without having been told obstacles are present, or guess with unusual accuracy whether an array of dots is moving or stationary. Individuals with blindsight are usually not surprised by these events and attribute them to coincidence.

Which of the following questions indicates the most serious weakness in the explanation described above?

A. Why don't people who are blind since birth exhibit similar abilities through coincidence?

B. Why are they not surprised by these events?

C. Why do such individuals tend refuse to accept the suggestion that the events are not coincidence?

D. If it feels like total blindness, but it is not functionally total blindness, is it still coincidence?

E. If it's coincidental, then why does it happen repeatedly?


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



Reading the question: when we read this question, it may be difficult to avoid reading the answer choices, the questions, without having made a prediction first. But this impulse can be counterproductive, because the less helpful the answer choices are, the more you'll need an exact filter, such as a prediction, to evaluate them.

Creating a filter: the stem says, What's the most serious weakness in the explanation described above? We try to get more specific about what exactly the explanation is. It's the view of the individuals with blindsight. There are two things stated: they are not surprised, and they attribute their unusual abilities to coincidence. We're not sure whether both parts are the explanation or just the coincidence part. It must be the coincidence part: that's an opinion, whereas the lack of surprise is more a feeling. So, the right answer will undermine the idea that this is really happening by coincidence. That's our filter, the critical detail.

Applying the filter: Which answer choices undermine coincidence? Choice (A) does; it attacks the coincidence theory. (B) and (C) focus on the attitudes of the people with blindsight, not the coincidence explanation, so we will knock them out. (D) is trying to redefine what coincidence is, and it appears to take as granted that the individuals are not functionally totally blind, but they believe that they are. So (D) is out. Choice (E) does not attack the coincidence explanation. Coincidental events do happen repeatedly; some repetition, in and of itself, is not odd. It's rather that these coincidences happen so much more often than with people who are originally blind. That rules out (E) and leads us straight back to (A), which must be the correct answer.

The correct answer is (A).
_________________
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1806
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Aug 2019, 10:17
1
Bunuel wrote:
Coincidental events do happen repeatedly; some repetition, in and of itself, is not odd.


This part of the official explanation misunderstands the meaning of the word "repeatedly". It does not mean "happens with some repetition". It means "constantly". If I take ten practice tests, and get a 500 on three of them, and an 800 on seven of them, I cannot correctly say that I "repeatedly" scored 500 on my practice tests. That's not what the word means. By the definition of words, "coincidental events" cannot happen "repeatedly" - if they do, they're not coincidental.

This question has two equally correct answers, A and E. What is the source?
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58402
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Aug 2019, 10:22
IanStewart wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Coincidental events do happen repeatedly; some repetition, in and of itself, is not odd.


This part of the official explanation misunderstands the meaning of the word "repeatedly". It does not mean "happens with some repetition". It means "constantly". If I take ten practice tests, and get a 500 on three of them, and an 800 on seven of them, I cannot correctly say that I "repeatedly" scored 500 on my practice tests. That's not what the word means. By the definition of words, "coincidental events" cannot happen "repeatedly" - if they do, they're not coincidental.

This question has two equally correct answers, A and E. What is the source?


GMAT Free.

Thank you, Ian. Archiving the topic!
_________________
GMAT Club Bot
Re: In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn   [#permalink] 23 Aug 2019, 10:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the phenomenon known as blindsight, some people who have been diagn

  post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne