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Invest in Education. Invest in a Better India  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2019, 02:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: Invest in Education. Invest in a Better India
The foundation of a nation lies in the skills and knowledge possessed by its youth. India has more than 50% of its population below the age of 25 and more than 65% below 35. These figures are indicative of the potential collective power of the youth. Over time, we have witnessed discussions on how India should adjust its policies to ensure that the youth population, which itself is nearly twice the population of USA, is sufficiently skilled for transformation as effective leaders. Such a transformation will drive economic growth and develop and sustain an ecosystem that fosters mutual respect, brotherhood and active participation in events that affect the direction the country takes.

One of the critical areas in this regard is the policy formulation for education reforms. Undoubtedly, education is one of the most important pillars of future growth and the government, despite countless attempts, has not been able to provide effective education to all of India’s youth. To put it simply: Access to quality education is sacrosanct. Although the quality offered and the contributions made by the premier institutes are known, there exist thousands of schools in villages and municipalities without sufficient teachers, inadequate infrastructure and they receive insufficient funds and support. The attempts made by hundreds of NGOs aren’t enough to fill in this humongous vacuum.

One of the reasons that this problem may sustain is that the government’s spending on education is less than 3% of the GDP. This figure is abysmally low given that nearly 650 million children and youth have to be imparted quality education from the primary through the post-doctoral level and this number is likely to increase in the intermediate future. And this is one of the main reasons that youth’s active participation in the election process and the resulting high desirability to vote is necessary. The youth of this country must vote largely on the basis of the education policies that are likely to be formulated, and they can be empowered only through education to bring about the much-needed transformation that India deserves across all fields.

– Abhik Banerjee, PGP 2019
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Invest in Education. Invest in a Better India.  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2019, 03:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: Invest in Education. Invest in a Better India.
The foundation of a nation lies in the skills and knowledge possessed by its youth. India has more than 50% of its population below the age of 25 and more than 65% below 35. These figures are indicative of the potential collective power of the youth. Over time, we have witnessed discussions on how India should adjust its policies to ensure that the youth population, which itself is nearly twice the population of USA, is sufficiently skilled for transformation as effective leaders. Such a transformation will drive economic growth and develop and sustain an ecosystem that fosters mutual respect, brotherhood and active participation in events that affect the direction the country takes.

One of the critical areas in this regard is the policy formulation for education reforms. Undoubtedly, education is one of the most important pillars of future growth and the government, despite countless attempts, has not been able to provide effective education to all of India’s youth. To put it simply: Access to quality education is sacrosanct. Although the quality offered and the contributions made by the premier institutes are known, there exist thousands of schools in villages and municipalities without sufficient teachers, inadequate infrastructure and they receive insufficient funds and support. The attempts made by hundreds of NGOs aren’t enough to fill in this humongous vacuum.

One of the reasons that this problem may sustain is that the government’s spending on education is less than 3% of the GDP. This figure is abysmally low given that nearly 650 million children and youth have to be imparted quality education from the primary through the post-doctoral level and this number is likely to increase in the intermediate future. And this is one of the main reasons that youth’s active participation in the election process and the resulting high desirability to vote is necessary. The youth of this country must vote largely on the basis of the education policies that are likely to be formulated, and they can be empowered only through education to bring about the much-needed transformation that India deserves across all fields.

– Abhik Banerjee, PGP Class of 2019

#NationalYouthDay
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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The youth is indeed watching  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2019, 07:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: The youth is indeed watching
Each time the celebration of democracy heralds upon the sovereign skies of India, there is a multitude of currents and countercurrents flowing through the veins of this great nation – and each of these times the youth is invariably at the epicentre of the tremors and tides that sweep it and decide its fate for the next half-decade (or so one hopes).

And yet the upcoming general election is historic in its own right as India proudly bears witness to the highest percentage of its population being constituted by youth. So, what is it that as a member of the fraternity, I expect and look forward to at this crucial the juncture of the Indian story?

Before the elections and leading to it, I expect more than verbal decrees and manifestos which unfortunately are lost under the wraps of political discourse once power is bestowed upon the chosen party and its office bearers.

We as a nation have been continually plagued by propaganda masquerading as goodwill from our elected representatives and to add to the dismay, forgetting what was promised in the wake of sweeping populist measures. So, this year, what I hope to see is not only promises of this party or that reaching out to me through all channels imaginable but also concrete action plans with timelines as to who will do what. This must be effectively coupled with reality and the separation of aspirations from necessities.

Development in healthcare, education, employment, infrastructure, etc. is a necessity, and we do not need assurances but detailed blueprints from each political party as well as independent candidates to tackle the issues that cripple us in these sectors. But this is not enough – intangible elements that secure the societal and cultural fabric of this diverse nation need to be honoured and, in some cases, restored or even bettered. This can only be ushered-in through the development of a scientific temperament while making and enacting decisions and necessarily keeping religious elements separate from the state. Appeasement is a disease, and it needs to be discarded – not propagated.

As for the election itself, it is crucial for the youth, educated or uneducated, to go out and vote or else, I feel, we lose out on the right not only to elect our leaders but also to critique their actions once they assume power. Armchair pundits and ignorant bystanders have never changed the course of history, let alone align with their views. Hence, voting is essential – even if it be NOTA.

It is a gargantuan task to comment on what one expects from the elected representatives and especially the government post elections, as fate and reality take unexpected turns in politics all too often. Nonetheless, there are two aspects on which I believe the incoming government must emphasise – curbing cyberbullying and enhance ease of doing business. The former is a must in these times of unprecedented online activity with the laws being awfully ill-equipped in identifying and punishing offenders. The latter, although on a positive trend in the past few years, has a plethora of summits to scale before the full potential of this country is utilised.

In addition to the above two, I sincerely want the government to steer clear of controversial measures as regards what people eat or the kind of content that is deemed fit/unfit for the ‘Indian audience’ when it comes to censorship of arts and entertainment. These might seem negligible in the larger scheme of things but are essential elements to a person’s individual freedom. Force-feeding patriotism to the population to the extent that this ‘sacred’ attribute has to undergo scrutiny and even criticism should be avoided.

The India story is one of steely determination and assertive progress. And as we reminisce Swami Vivekananda on his birthday by dedicating it to the youth of this nation, we should remember the emphasis the great man laid on the nature and necessities of disagreement amongst a people and how amidst all sorts of division, India has stood and will stand the tests of time as a nation built around humane principles. The leaders we elect represent our tremendous faith that we have in the system that we have built for ourselves, the Constitution that guides each one of us to rise and shine, the evergreen attitude of living and letting live and the indomitable spirit to quash all negativities to arise and awake time and again until the goal is reached. Hence, it is their sacred obligation to deliver on what they have promised and our sacred duty to remind them continually, to achieve constructive outcomes for the people and the land.

And the youth is indeed watching. #NationalYouthDay

– Syed Shakeel Imdad, PGP 2019
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Youth and Elections  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2019, 02:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: Youth and Elections
Elections are the perfect example of unpredictability. When elections happen in the largest democracy of the world, it is indeed a big affair. Increasingly adding to the unpredictability factor is the young electorate, comprising of educated youth and first-time voters; people who not only form the much-talked-about demographic dividend that will boost India to greatness but also come with very little political baggage or affiliations, thereby giving political parties the opportunity to garner steadfast loyalty from these young minds.

The Census of 2011 forecasts that about 2 Crore Indians turn 18 annually. Eight years down the line, when elections come around this year, this number could easily be upward of 10 Crore. This is a segment no political party can afford to dismiss. First-time voters exhibit characteristics significantly different from other voters. They are educated, tech-savvy and highly aware; they have the potential to create a profound impact on their social networks by taking the role of influencers or promoters. They leverage social media to the most substantial extent and are capable of generating large ripples through network effects.

Cheap smartphones and the high pervasion of 4G are likely to be game-changers in elections 2019. It is predicted that political parties will also leverage social media like never before – video content, WhatsApp and Twitter posts will be catalysts in wooing media-savvy, young voters.

As responsible, aware citizens, the onus is on the youth to make informed decisions. Young voters need to first be cognizant of the fact that we live in a flourishing democracy which ensures freedom of thought to every person who calls this nation home. This said, exercising caution while expressing one’s views and constraint while commenting on others’ views (which may be contrary to one’s own) will go a long way in ensuring that our democracy remains genuinely functional. It also becomes extremely crucial for young voters to make informed choices before voting. They need to identify leaders and political parties not because their peers support them, instead because their views align. It is imperative that young voters do not fall into the trap of peer pressure for this leads to our democracy becoming dysfunctional in the long run.

In a democracy, the voice of every individual counts. For India to truly achieve development, the demographic dividend has to be harnessed to its fullest potential. The first step to this endeavour is an informed, educated vote.

#NationalYouthDay

About the Author:

Shabala Natarajan is a software engineer from Amrita University. An engineer in the head and an artist by heart, Shabala practices fusions of Renaissance art styles and experiments with Chiaroscuro and Cangiante. She has three years of experience in software development and product management, especially in Business Intelligence software.

A passionate polyglot, Shabala loves travelling, exploring new cultures and learning languages. She heads the International Cultures and Exposure SIG at ISB.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Reforms the youth need in the nation  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2019, 03:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: Reforms the youth need in the nation
Based on my own experience, I believe, India needs two critical reforms: Technical Education and Judicial Reform.

Even though we churn out high numbers of engineers and diploma graduates, they lack basic technical skills and couldn’t be employed by the industry in various occupations as such. This lacuna between industry demanded skills and the skillset of educated youth lead to the high unemployment among the youth, since the industry players don’t want to experiment with an unskilled workforce, and even if they would, they hire top students from premier institutes.

To address this issue, India should have a vocational training system, wherein the students spend 2 to 3 days a week to learn the practical foundations of occupation. Whereas on the other days of week job-specific theoretical concepts are taught in school. This system can be adopted not only for engineers but also for diploma and ITI students. To implement this system at a central level, a partnership between the government, institutes and industry needs to be established to create a win-win situation for each party involved.

Further, enforcing legal rights is an essential part of the innovation led system. Without this entrepreneur feel shortchanged, and further innovation stifles in the country. The major bottleneck to achieving this is the capacity. There are upwards of 2.5 crore cases still pending and many because of the long-drawn judicial process are never filed or reported.

To address this, firstly, a high number of judges, with no compromise on integrity and quality, need to be recruited. This is a challenging task, but a merit-based formula similar to UPSC can be looked at. Second, for commercial issues such as property rights, etc. separate commercial courts, than having a common court which upholds all nature of laws, shall be established to take up such cases in a faster and efficient manner. Third, by use of technology, the court process can be digitalised entirely, reducing the turnaround time of cases.

#NationalYouthDay

About the author:

Nitin Goyal is a current PGP student at the Indian School of Business. Pre-ISB Nitin has seven years of diverse corporate experience ranging from Business development, project management, corporate strategy across six countries. Nitin is also an avid Formula 1 fan and a yoga enthusiast.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience

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A first-time voter in a fostering democracy  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2019, 09:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: A first-time voter in a fostering democracy
It is estimated that every year about 20 million citizens in India turn 18. In 2014, approximately 150 million were eligible to vote in the Lok Sabha elections for the first time in their lives. In 2019, that number is expected to rise to about 160 million. And the total population of the country between the ages of 18 to 35 is estimated to be more than 400 million.

The drivers of the voting behaviour of this age group are expected to be different from their parent’s or grandparent’s generation, and many experts have touted them as a key voter group whose votes can be swung and who will play a crucial role in deciding the outcome of the election.

In this digital age, with access to information (and misinformation) being enabled to a great extent, given the growing internet penetration, an informed voter is much more probable than ever before. So how should someone who would be voting for the first time in a general election cast her/his vote? There is no easy answer to this question.

Party vs Candidate vs Leader – This is a dilemma all of us face. People who have voted two or more times, usually have their affiliations with some party and the first-time voters tend to vote based on issues, leaders. The anti-defection law in India makes it difficult for the educated voter to vote for the candidate over the party as the candidate would be unable to break the rank and file of the party. I rank the candidate first then the party but looking at 2014 some might feel the leader is paramount. Hence, I believe that our forefathers who debated whether we should adopt a presidential democracy or a parliamentary democracy chose the latter for a reason.

While choosing the candidate, a lot more is known to the corner chai wala or Pan Shop about her/his actual reputation than what is publicised. So, I would encourage everyone to discuss, debate and have a dialogue with peers, neighbours and relatives to ensure not only that you have considered as much information as possible but also to encourage this culture of debating issues and having a constructive dialogue that epitomises democracy.

#NationalYouthDay

About the Author:

Shreyas Habbu, PGP 2019, Heads the Public Policy Club at ISB. Having worked as a political consultant and as a Fellow to the Chief Minister of Maharashtra, Shreyas enjoys having conversations about politics, government and policies of the government.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Updates on Family Business  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2019, 03:00
FROM ISB Admissions Blog: Updates on Family Business
Wealth to enrich others! What money means to billionaire Kiran Mazumdar Shaw

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/magazines/panache/wealth-to-enrich-others-what-money-means-to-billionaire-kiran-mazumdar-shaw/articleshow/67316946.cms

 

How This Third-Generation Family Business Has Minted 70 Millionaires

https://www.inc.com/christine-lagorio/how-this-third-generation-family-business-has-minted-70-millionaires.html?cid=search

 

 

Succession planning: Don’t let your family business crumble

https://realbusiness.co.uk/succession-planning-family-business/

 

 

Leadership and Team Management in a Family Business

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/324280
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Updates on Family Business &nbs [#permalink] 18 Jan 2019, 03:00

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