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It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical

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It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 07:40
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Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

63% (01:14) correct 37% (01:26) wrong based on 62 sessions

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It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical laboratories have been found to be present in surrounding lakes and rivers. Taken in larger-than-advised quantities, these diclofenac effluents could have serious health effects, but they are present in quantities far too low to cause any physiological response in people who drink the water or bathe in it. Nevertheless, medical experts contend that eliminating these trace amounts from the water will have public health benefits, since _________________.

A) Some of the diclofenac effluents found in lakes and rivers, even in large quantities, are harmless to humans.
B) disease-causing bacteria exposed to low concentrations of certain diclofenac effluents can become resistant to them.
C) The side effects of medicines containing diclofenac have not yet been fully explored.
D) Most diclofenac effluents that reach lakes or rivers rapidly break down into harmless substances.
E) Some of the diclofenac effluents found in lakes and rivers can counteract possible harmful effects of other such medical pollutants found there.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 09:14
Not the best question in the world IMO - I think this is one where you have to go through by process of elimination.

Argument: Eliminating trace amounts of diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical laboratories will improve public health. Why?

Let's look at the answers:

A. Diclofenac effluents, even in large amounts, are harmless to humans. We can eliminate this, since it directly contradicts the argument. If even large amounts of whatever this thing is are harmless to humans, then eliminating them will not improve public health.

B. Bacteria can become resistant to diclofenac effluents. Well, if these things are used in pharmaceuticals - meaning it's probably a material for medicine - then that's pretty bad. It means that disease-causing bacteria in the water will be resistant to medicine, and you can be exposed to these bacteria if you swim in the rivers and lakes. However, this may still be off topic and we may find a better answer. We don't eliminate it and keep going.

C. The side effects of medicines have not been fully explored - we can eliminate this, since this doesn't mention anything about whether diclofenac effluent is good or bad. If it's not fully explored, we can't justify saying whether it is good or bad for us.

D. Again, an answer that goes against our argument. If it breaks down into harmless substance, there's no logic for why we need to remove it.

E. Some of the effluent can counteract possible harmful effects of other such medical pollutants found there. This is the trap answer - there's too much generality for it to be considered. The fact that it says "possible" harmful effects means we cannot determine for sure that removing the effluents will help public health, which is what the argument states. If this answer said "diclofenac effluents counteract harmful effects from other medical pollutants", I think I would've picked this answer.

Going through the answers, only B and E possibly make sense. B is the better answer - it is more specific, definitely states something harmful to human health that can be prevented (disease-causing bacteria vs. POSSIBLE harmful effects), and is my answer.

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Re: It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 07:00
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gunster wrote:
Not the best question in the world IMO - I think this is one where you have to go through by process of elimination.

Argument: Eliminating trace amounts of diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical laboratories will improve public health. Why?

Let's look at the answers:

A. Diclofenac effluents, even in large amounts, are harmless to humans. We can eliminate this, since it directly contradicts the argument. If even large amounts of whatever this thing is are harmless to humans, then eliminating them will not improve public health.

B. Bacteria can become resistant to diclofenac effluents. Well, if these things are used in pharmaceuticals - meaning it's probably a material for medicine - then that's pretty bad. It means that disease-causing bacteria in the water will be resistant to medicine, and you can be exposed to these bacteria if you swim in the rivers and lakes. However, this may still be off topic and we may find a better answer. We don't eliminate it and keep going.

C. The side effects of medicines have not been fully explored - we can eliminate this, since this doesn't mention anything about whether diclofenac effluent is good or bad. If it's not fully explored, we can't justify saying whether it is good or bad for us.

D. Again, an answer that goes against our argument. If it breaks down into harmless substance, there's no logic for why we need to remove it.

E. Some of the effluent can counteract possible harmful effects of other such medical pollutants found there. This is the trap answer - there's too much generality for it to be considered. The fact that it says "possible" harmful effects means we cannot determine for sure that removing the effluents will help public health, which is what the argument states. If this answer said "diclofenac effluents counteract harmful effects from other medical pollutants", I think I would've picked this answer.

Going through the answers, only B and E possibly make sense. B is the better answer - it is more specific, definitely states something harmful to human health that can be prevented (disease-causing bacteria vs. POSSIBLE harmful effects), and is my answer.


Hi
IMO there's no ambiguity in the question.
Answer is clearly B.
Question asks - eliminating these trace amounts from the water will have public health benefits, since _________________.
Option E infact gives a reason why trace amounts of diclofenac will be beneficial, hence it is weakening the argument. We have to choose the option which indicates the reason why eliminating trace amounts is beneficial. Only option B fits.
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Re: It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2017, 09:10
Ah yes, you are correct. For some reason I read E and somehow interpreted the meaning to mean counteracting beneficial effects.

You are right - the answer is definitively B.

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Re: It has been found that excess diclofenac effluents from pharmaceutical   [#permalink] 29 Nov 2017, 09:10
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