GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Oct 2019, 08:45

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior PS Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: It always seems impossible until it's done.
Joined: 16 Sep 2016
Posts: 737
GMAT 1: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT 2: 770 Q51 V42
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2019, 09:28
1
3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

59% (02:23) correct 41% (02:31) wrong based on 222 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between China and the West were opened many centuries, even millennia, earlier than 200 B.C., contrary to what is currently believed. After all, what made the Great Silk Road so attractive as a trade route linking China and the West—level terrain, easily traversable mountain passes, and desert oases—would also have made it an attractive route for the original emigrants to China from Africa and the Middle East, and this early migration began at least one million years ago.

That a migration from Africa and the Middle East to China occurred at least one million years ago figures in the above reasoning in which one of the following ways?

(A) It is cited as conclusive evidence for the claim that trade links between China and the Middle East were established long before 200 B.C.
(B) It is an intermediate conclusion made plausible by the description of the terrain along which the migration supposedly took place.
(C) It is offered as evidence in support of the claim that trade routes between China and the West could easily have been established much earlier than is currently believed.
(D) It is offered as evidence against the claim that trade routes between China and Africa preceded those eventually established between China and the Middle East.
(E) It is the main conclusion that the argument attempts to establish about intercourse between China and the West.

_________________
Regards,
Gladi



“Do. Or do not. There is no try.” - Yoda (The Empire Strikes Back)
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9705
Location: Pune, India
Re: It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2019, 04:49
3
Gladiator59 wrote:
It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between China and the West were opened many centuries, even millennia, earlier than 200 B.C., contrary to what is currently believed. After all, what made the Great Silk Road so attractive as a trade route linking China and the West—level terrain, easily traversable mountain passes, and desert oases—would also have made it an attractive route for the original emigrants to China from Africa and the Middle East, and this early migration began at least one million years ago.

That a migration from Africa and the Middle East to China occurred at least one million years ago figures in the above reasoning in which one of the following ways?

(A) It is cited as conclusive evidence for the claim that trade links between China and the Middle East were established long before 200 B.C.
(B) It is an intermediate conclusion made plausible by the description of the terrain along which the migration supposedly took place.
(C) It is offered as evidence in support of the claim that trade routes between China and the West could easily have been established much earlier than is currently believed.
(D) It is offered as evidence against the claim that trade routes between China and Africa preceded those eventually established between China and the Middle East.
(E) It is the main conclusion that the argument attempts to establish about intercourse between China and the West.


Great Silk road was attractive terrain long ago too.
Early migration began one million years ago.
- It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between China and the West were opened many centuries, even millennia, earlier than 200 B.C., contrary to what is currently believed.

The argument provides evidence for a possibility - that the trade routes between China and West were opened many centuries earlier than is currently believed.

(A) It is cited as conclusive evidence for the claim that trade links between China and the Middle East were established long before 200 B.C.
The argument does not give conclusive evidence. It just says why it is possible and perhaps probable.

(B) It is an intermediate conclusion made plausible by the description of the terrain along which the migration supposedly took place.
Again, not an intermediate conclusion. Note that the argument gives no conclusion. It just says that it would not be surprising if this turned out to be true. It doesn't say that anything is true. An intermediate conclusion is a conclusion too which leads to a final conclusion of the argument, but the argument gives no conclusion.
The evidence given by argument would just make it likely for it to be true. It doesn't establish at all that this indeed was the case.

(C) It is offered as evidence in support of the claim that trade routes between China and the West could easily have been established much earlier than is currently believed.
Correct. The argument does give evidence in support of the claim that routes could have been established much earlier.

(D) It is offered as evidence against the claim that trade routes between China and Africa preceded those eventually established between China and the Middle East.
Incorrect. Opposite to what it actually does.

(E) It is the main conclusion that the argument attempts to establish about intercourse between China and the West.
Irrelevant

Answer (C)
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 21 Jul 2018
Posts: 177
Location: United States
Concentration: General Management, Social Entrepreneurship
It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2019, 03:38
(Conclusion) It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between China and the West were opened many centuries, even millennia, earlier than 200 B.C., contrary to what is currently believed.

(Premise) After all, what made the Great Silk Road so attractive as a trade route linking China and the West—level terrain, easily traversable mountain passes, and desert oases—would also have made it an attractive route for the original emigrants to China from Africa and the Middle East, and this early migration began at least one million years ago.

We’re definitely looking for an answer that says that the bold face is a premise supporting the conclusion.

That a migration from Africa and the Middle East to China occurred at least one million years ago figures in the above reasoning in which one of the following ways?

(A) It is cited as conclusive evidence for the claim that trade links between China and the Middle East were established long before 200 B.C.
Hm, this could work but I’m not sure it’s “conclusive”…sounds like the author is pretty wary about this piece of evidence. And he's just using this belief (probable evidence) to support his conclusion.

(B) It is an intermediate conclusion made plausible by the description of the terrain along which the migration supposedly took place.
It is definitely not an intermediate conclusion. It’s a premise!

(C) It is offered as evidence in support of the claim that trade routes between China and the West could easily have been established much earlier than is currently believed.
Hm, I could see it offered as the author’s belief (or evidence) to support the “surprising” conclusion.

(D) It is offered as evidence against the claim that trade routes between China and Africa preceded those eventually established between China and the Middle East.
It is SUPPORTING the conclusion, not opposing it.

(E) It is the main conclusion that the argument attempts to establish about intercourse between China and the West.
It is a premise!

_________________
.
"What you do in practice determines your level of success. I used to tell my players: You have to give 100% everyday. Whatever you don't give, you can't make it up tomorrow."
GMAT Club Bot
It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C   [#permalink] 31 May 2019, 03:38
Display posts from previous: Sort by

It would not be surprising to discover that the trade routes between C

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne