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Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and

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Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2009, 16:59
3
14
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

68% (01:53) correct 32% (02:03) wrong based on 448 sessions

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Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.
(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.
(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.
(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.
(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 10:00
5
1
ritula wrote:
Though I find A as the best. but i wanna know wht is wrong with E?

Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

------------------

Hi ritula,


There's nothing wrong with option E. IMHO, in fact, everything is right with option E.

Premise 1: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men.

Premise 2: Only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women.

Conclusion: There are few women who win elections for these offices not because they have difficulty winning elections but because very few of them want to run.

What can we do to weaken the conclusion? We can attack (weaken) either of the following points:
1. not because they have difficulty winning elections
2. but because very few of them want to run

Explanation:

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection. ---> It's more like a Red-Herring. Though, we are talking about election, we are not concerned about what happens during re-election. I have no problem accepting this option as a distraction.

Still if someone is not OK with this explanation, here's for you: I assume the above statement to be true but I would also like to add that the proportion of women incumbents who won normal elections (where no reelection was held) was far greater than the proportion of men incumbents who won normal elections. If this is true, you cannot say that the argument is undermined.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women. ---> I found this tricky. One woman competes against another woman but that does not affect the argument. Why?

w.r.t. Point 1: This option does not show why they have difficulty winning elections. Whether a woman fights against a man or a woman, how does it matter? Is she facing difficulty in winning? No!

w.r.t. Point 2: This option only states that few women run for elections but it DOES NOT state why only few of them are interested in contesting elections.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices. ---> This actually strengthens the conclusion by stating that many of them aren't interested in running for elections.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.
---> Irrelevant.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns. ---> This very clearly attacks (weakens) point 1. Lack of funds for campaigning can be a major factor for someone's defeat in an election.
-----------------------

So, my choice is option E.

Hope that helps.


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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2009, 19:16
reply2spg wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.
(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.
(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.
(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.
(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.


Answer choice B women run office against other women is irrelevant
C is wrong. This actually strengthen the argument
D is wrong people holding local office is out of scope
E is wrong cannot get adequate funding is irrelevant.

I am going with A
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2009, 21:37
A since it discusses proportions (which essentially means likelihood)
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 04:15
Though I find A as the best. but i wanna know wht is wrong with E?
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 09:46
ritula wrote:
Though I find A as the best. but i wanna know wht is wrong with E?


In E, the ability to secure funding is talked about. We are not talking about this ability; but just plain ability of women to win elections. Hence, incumbents ran but lost implies to me that it is not for lack of want in women but their ability to win that they lost.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 11:02
My take goes to E. It directly weakens the argument.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 16:09
bigfernhead wrote:
My take goes to E. It directly weakens the argument.


My choice is E which raise another reason why few women win election. A is irrlevant, it offers re-election.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 20:13
YEssssssssssss......that clearls my doubt. Thanks Technext +1 frm me
Technext wrote:
ritula wrote:
Though I find A as the best. but i wanna know wht is wrong with E?

Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

------------------

Hi ritula,


There's nothing wrong with option E. IMHO, in fact, everything is right with option E.

Premise 1: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men.

Premise 2: Only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women.

Conclusion: There are few women who win elections for these offices not because they have difficulty winning elections but because very few of them want to run.

What can we do to weaken the conclusion? We can attack (weaken) either of the following points:
1. not because they have difficulty winning elections
2. but because very few of them want to run

Explanation:

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection. ---> It's more like a Red-Herring. Though, we are talking about election, we are not concerned about what happens during re-election. I have no problem accepting this option as a distraction.

Still if someone is not OK with this explanation, here's for you: I assume the above statement to be true but I would also like to add that the proportion of women incumbents who won normal elections (where no reelection was held) was far greater than the proportion of men incumbents who won normal elections. If this is true, you cannot say that the argument is undermined.

(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women. ---> I found this tricky. One woman competes against another woman but that does not affect the argument. Why?

w.r.t. Point 1: This option does not show why they have difficulty winning elections. Whether a woman fights against a man or a woman, how does it matter? Is she facing difficulty in winning? No!

w.r.t. Point 2: This option only states that few women run for elections but it DOES NOT state why only few of them are interested in contesting elections.

(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices. ---> This actually strengthens the conclusion by stating that many of them aren't interested in running for elections.

(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.
---> Irrelevant.

(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns. ---> This very clearly attacks (weakens) point 1. Lack of funds for campaigning can be a major factor for someone's defeat in an election.
-----------------------

So, my choice is option E.

Hope that helps.


Regards,
Technext
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 21:37
we have to show
"women have difficulty winning elections"
IMO E

reply2spg wrote:
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?

(A) Last year the proportion of women incumbents who won reelection was smaller than the proportion of men incumbents who won reelection.
(B) Few women who run for state and national offices run against other women.
(C) Most women who have no strong desire to be politicians never run for state and national offices.
(D) The proportion of people holding local offices who are women is smaller than the proportion of people holding state and national offices who are women.
(E) Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns.

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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2009, 02:25
I agree with option E.

We can further significantly undermine option A, which states that the ratio of incumbent women candidates winning reelections is lower compared to their male counterparts.
The incumbent woman candidate may be facing another woman, in this case a woman will still win an election.
Since the woman candidate has lost an election the ratio of incumbent woman candidates reelected to office will decrease.
Nowhere does this option prove that woman are incapable of winning elections or their unwillingness to participate in elections
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2009, 03:52
Agree, E it is.....:)

Nice explanation from Technext.......
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2009, 17:57
Guys I didnt understand.
Quote:
What can we do to weaken the conclusion? We can attack (weaken) either of the following points:
1. not because they have difficulty winning elections
2. but because very few of them want to run


Option E is STRENTHENING the second pt.,saying YES very few women run albeit for a different reason.Please explain.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2009, 20:02
tejal777 wrote:
Option E is STRENTHENING the second pt.,saying YES very few women run albeit for a different reason.Please explain.


You have to read more carefully. The premise states that "Many more women than men who want to run for state and national offices do not because they cannot get adequate funding for their campaigns". This directly attacks the argument, which states that women DO NOT want to run. This says that women MAY want to run but of those who DO, at least some CAN'T.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2009, 08:45
Agree with E.

Great detailed explanation from Technext! [+1]

Technext wrote:
What can we do to weaken the conclusion? We can attack (weaken) either of the following points:
1. not because they have difficulty winning elections
2. but because very few of them want to run


for point 1 above, there is already premises stating that last year women were as likely to win as men. IMO, we shouldn't attack the point 1 as there is already a support for the argument in point 1. Only point 2 stands with no support and should be attacked.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2009, 10:17
I think the answer is A.

The question asked was "Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the conclusion given?"

The conclusion given was "the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run."

So something that undermines the conclusion should support either "women have difficulty winning elections" (1) or "the number of women who want to run is not so few" (2) or both.

A shows an evident that even those women who want to run (those running for re-election) had difficulty winning elections as compared to men. So it supports (1).

E didn't support (2), because it only implies that women are more likely to fail to get funding and as a result not run for the state. It doesn't imply that there are more women who want to run than men.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2009, 08:25
Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and national offices were about as likely to win as men. However, only about fifteen percent of the candidates for these offices were women. Therefore, the reason there are so few women who win elections for these offices is not that women have difficulty winning elections but that so few women want to run.

I think A undermines this reasoning because it does what bold part says. But conclusion says bold part is not the reason. Hence A undermines the reasoning

E on the other part I think is a Shell Game type answer which makes you believe that it undermines the reasoning.

IMO A

Please someone provide an OA. This is a tricky one. 650+ Level
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2009, 09:59
I'm going to back up E but I don't think we are focusing on the correct conclusion.

It's not that women don't win elections (they do at 50%)
It's that woman won't run for politics.

We need to weaken the "but" statement

E does this by addressing that it's not that women won't run it's that they can't run due to not obtaining proper funding to even run in the first place.
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2009, 11:42
IMO A.

conclusion: reason so few women win election is not because difficulty winning elections but so few women want to run.

A only answer that undermines: less women won reelection than men who won relection so more men won reelection, resulting in more men than women in office.

B supports conclusion: women don't want to run against women so fewer women want to run.

C irrelevant: women who don't want to run never runs - only tells us some women don't want to run for office. Conclusion

D irrelevant: conclusion does not compare local office with state and national offices.

E supports conclusion: women don't want to run because they can't secure funding; thus, "so few women want to run".
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2009, 15:45
E, because it directly refutes the conclusion
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Re: Last year in the United States, women who ran for state and &nbs [#permalink] 25 Aug 2009, 15:45

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