It is currently 18 Feb 2018, 12:03

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jan 2018
Posts: 3
Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2018, 09:37
I am interested in pursuing an MBA program and I am aware that a good MBA score plays a very important factor in the admissions process.

I suffer from a severe diagnosed disability in math, which has plagued me throughout my academic career.

Testing wise I tend to get rock bottom quant scores and sky high scores on things like verbal and writing.

I was wondering if there is anyway for someone like me to do well on the GMAT? As aside from quantitative matters my application is pretty strong for most high ranking MBA programs.

Thank you in advance for whatever advice I get! :-)
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT Assassin/Co-Founder
Affiliations: EMPOWERgmat
Joined: 19 Dec 2014
Posts: 11024
Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V49
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2018, 13:23
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Hi Londinium,

To start, the GMAT is a consistent, predictable Exam, so you CAN train to score at a higher level. Whatever 'issues' you might have with math, you will need to train to overcome them though. Thankfully, most of the 'math work' that you'll have to do on Test Day is limited to basic Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry. You'll need to learn all of the necessary formulas and rules - and you'll have to learn patterns and Tactics - but again, all of this is defined and predictable.

Since it sounds like you're just beginning your studies, then it would be a good idea to take a FULL-LENGTH practice CAT Test; you can download 2 for free from www.mba.com (and they come with some additional practice materials). If you want to do a little studying first, so that you can familiarize yourself with the basic content and question types, then that's okay - but you shouldn't wait too long to take that initial CAT. That score will give us a good sense of your natural strengths and weaknesses and will help provide a basis for comparison as you continue to study. A FULL CAT takes about 4 hours to complete, so make sure that you've set aside enough time to take it in one sitting. Once you have those scores, you should report back here and we can come up with a study plan.

I'd like to know a bit more about your timeline and goals:
1) What is your goal score?
2) When are you planning to take the GMAT?
3) When are you planning to apply to Business School?
4) When you refer to a 'severe diagnosed disability in math', are you talking about an actual medical diagnosis or that you've never really developed math 'skills'?

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
_________________

760+: Learn What GMAT Assassins Do to Score at the Highest Levels
Contact Rich at: Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Rich Cohen

Co-Founder & GMAT Assassin

Special Offer: Save $75 + GMAT Club Tests Free
  Official GMAT Exam Packs + 70 Pt. Improvement Guarantee
www.empowergmat.com/

***********************Select EMPOWERgmat Courses now include ALL 6 Official GMAC CATs!***********************

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jan 2018
Posts: 3
Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2018, 14:50
1) might sound cliche but the best score I can possibly achieve.
2) I am currently in a full time masters program (non-business related) right now. So most likely not until NOV-DEC at the earliest.
3) still trying to work that out. I guess in theory I could apply in Spring 19 but most likely not until 2020.
4) I am referring to an actual medical diagnosis.

Sorry if these answers aren’t direct. As I am still deciding on my timeline. As I think I might need 1-2 years of more actual paid work experience once I finish my current masters. However, both academically and professionally I’ve concluded an MBA is the next best step for me.

Last edited by Londinium on 28 Jan 2018, 15:16, edited 1 time in total.
Expert Post
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT Assassin/Co-Founder
Affiliations: EMPOWERgmat
Joined: 19 Dec 2014
Posts: 11024
Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V49
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2018, 15:11
Hi Londinium,

Thinking about your GMAT study plans and application plans in advance is a good idea. By doing so, you can approach this process without facing the pressure of an external deadline. I would agree that finishing your current Masters Program before starting your GMAT studies is also a smart choice. Many Business Schools expect their applicants to have a certain amount of quality Work Experience before they apply, so you should certainly consider that when deciding when to apply.

At some point, you should also consider the types of Schools/Programs that you might want to apply to. Once you have that list, you'll be better able to define the type of GMAT Score that would be considered 'competitive' (instead of the rather vague goal of scoring "as high as possible"). Many Test Takers spend 3 months (or more) of consistent study time before they hit their 'peak' scores, so you should make sure that you have that free time available for your studies (whenever you choose to begin).

If you have any additional questions, then you can feel free to contact me directly.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
_________________

760+: Learn What GMAT Assassins Do to Score at the Highest Levels
Contact Rich at: Rich.C@empowergmat.com

Rich Cohen

Co-Founder & GMAT Assassin

Special Offer: Save $75 + GMAT Club Tests Free
  Official GMAT Exam Packs + 70 Pt. Improvement Guarantee
www.empowergmat.com/

***********************Select EMPOWERgmat Courses now include ALL 6 Official GMAC CATs!***********************

VP
VP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1281
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: 339 Q170 V169
Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2018, 18:32
Londinium wrote:
I am interested in pursuing an MBA program and I am aware that a good MBA score plays a very important factor in the admissions process.

I suffer from a severe diagnosed disability in math, which has plagued me throughout my academic career.

Testing wise I tend to get rock bottom quant scores and sky high scores on things like verbal and writing.

I was wondering if there is anyway for someone like me to do well on the GMAT? As aside from quantitative matters my application is pretty strong for most high ranking MBA programs.

Thank you in advance for whatever advice I get! :-)
The GMAT does try to ensure equal access for people with disabilities. Take a look at this document. The process appears to be quite lengthy, so it'd be good to start early if you plan to request accommodations.

Also, keep in mind that a low quant score does not automatically mean that the total GMAT score will be low. For example, a combination of 10-15% (percentile) in quant and 99% in verbal will result in a total GMAT score of around 600. If you can show your target schools that you've taken other steps to improve your quantitative skills, you could be in with a good chance.

Finally, I think it'd be a good idea for you to prep a bit and then take one of the GMATPrep practice tests. That will help you understand just how tough the GMAT is (or isn't).
_________________

Ascore Prep | Bangalore

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jan 2018
Posts: 3
Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jan 2018, 02:20
Thank you for the info,

I will look into it.

So in theory I can bomb the quant but still get a decent score if I do well on the verbal?

I guess if I study hard on the quant section and bring it up then even a 700 shouldn't be out of reach?

Just curious how does the IR and AWA factor into the admissions process? Do B-Schools consider those sections as well? Because I heard they didn't?
VP
VP
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 1281
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: 339 Q170 V169
Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jan 2018, 06:09
Londinium wrote:
Thank you for the info,

I will look into it.

So in theory I can bomb the quant but still get a decent score if I do well on the verbal?

I guess if I study hard on the quant section and bring it up then even a 700 shouldn't be out of reach?

Just curious how does the IR and AWA factor into the admissions process? Do B-Schools consider those sections as well? Because I heard they didn't?
You should be able to get a 700 with a Q37-38 (34-36%) and a very high verbal score (V47-48, 99+%).

AWA isn't very important, but the importance of IR has been going up. I'm sure it's different for different schools, but you should not ignore it.
_________________

Ascore Prep | Bangalore

Expert Post
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 04 Dec 2015
Posts: 467
GMAT 1: 790 Q51 V49
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2018, 13:18
I'd recommend looking into testing accommodations as soon as possible.

That doesn't necessarily mean getting extra time, although that's the most common accommodation that people get. You may be allowed to take the test over two consecutive days instead of all in one sitting, or you may even be able to have a person (or software) read the problems out loud to you (possibly useful if you have dyscalculia). Exactly what form your accommodations take will depend on your diagnosis and what you and the GMAC are able to agree on.

Be aggressive about it! The point isn't to give you an advantage, the point is to make sure that the test fairly measures your abilities. The GMAC tries to write a test that will fairly measure most peoples' abilities, but it obviously just isn't a good or valid test for some of us.
_________________

Image

Chelsey Cooley | Manhattan Prep Instructor | Seattle and Online

My upcoming GMAT trial classes | GMAT blog archive

Re: Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed?   [#permalink] 04 Feb 2018, 13:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Learning Disability in Math-Am I screwed?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderator: HKD1710

HOT DEALS FOR FEBRUARY
Math Revolution - $69/mo Type Coupon Code: HOTDEAL2
Economist GMAT - Free Free 1-week trial + Free Test
examPAL - $75 off all packages Valentine's special. Valid until Feb. 15
Kaplan Courses - Save $475 $225 Discount + $250 Bonus
Target Test Prep - Save $800 $50 Discount + $750 Bonus [GMAT Club
Tests and Premium MBA Bundle]
EMPOWERgmat - $99/mo GMAT Club tests included 2nd month
GMAT Club Tests - Free Included with every course purchase
of $149 or more - Full List is here


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.