GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Jun 2019, 08:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

M02-36

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 55635
M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2014, 00:19
12
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

59% (00:59) correct 41% (01:17) wrong based on 256 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

If \(x\) is an integer, what is the value of \(x\)?


(1) \(x^2 = x^3\)

(2) \(x\) is both a perfect square and a perfect cube. (Note: a perfect square, is an integer that can be written as the square of an integer. For example \(16=4^2\), is a perfect square. Similarly a perfect cube, is an integer that can be written as the cube of an integer. For example \(27=3^3\), is a perfect cube.)

_________________
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 55635
Re M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2014, 00:19
1
Retired Moderator
avatar
Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Posts: 650
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2014, 11:02
the hint in the question seems misleading especially when it is read very literally

hint says: Similarly a perfect cube, is an integer that can be written as the cube of some other integer-----------> this implies that 1 cannot be a perfect cube because 1 cannot be written as a cube of "some other integer" but yes it can be written as a cube of 1 itself !! , according to this hint numbers like 125 ( for 125 can be written as 5^3 ---->other integer 5 ) will fall into this definition .
however , if one does not look at the hint then it is oki because as per common knowledge 1 does qualify as perfect cube
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 74
Location: Italy
GMAT 1: 600 Q42 V31
GMAT 2: 700 Q48 V38
GPA: 3.75
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Dec 2014, 05:27
aditya8062 wrote:
the hint in the question seems misleading especially when it is read very literally

hint says: Similarly a perfect cube, is an integer that can be written as the cube of some other integer-----------> this implies that 1 cannot be a perfect cube because 1 cannot be written as a cube of "some other integer" but yes it can be written as a cube of 1 itself !! , according to this hint numbers like 125 ( for 125 can be written as 5^3 ---->other integer 5 ) will fall into this definition .
however , if one does not look at the hint then it is oki because as per common knowledge 1 does qualify as perfect cube


i agree with you,
this definition confused me
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 09 Mar 2013
Posts: 14
Location: Russian Federation
Concentration: General Management, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 550 Q43 V23
GMAT 2: 590 Q49 V22
GMAT 3: 690 Q49 V34
GMAT 4: 740 Q49 V41
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Apr 2015, 18:12
It's a quite controversial problem.
Hope I won't face similar one on the GMAT.

http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/52368.html
http://www.ask.com/math/zero-perfect-sq ... 33a2cfecf1
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 127
GMAT 1: 630 Q48 V29
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 12:19
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. Perfect squares are integers 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, and so on. Similarly, perfect cubes are: 0, 1, 8, 27, 64... Thus \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. For example: \(x\) can still be 0 or 1.


Answer: E


I think for stmnt 2) 0,1,64,729 are there but i ignored 0 and 1 becoz u said cube and square of "other" number
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Apr 2014
Posts: 120
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Technology
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V26
GMAT 2: 660 Q51 V27
GMAT 3: 680 Q50 V31
GMAT 4: 710 Q50 V35
GMAT 5: 760 Q50 V42
Reviews Badge
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Nov 2015, 16:37
I agree. The hint in (2) is really confusing. However, I don't know why I thought 1, but not 0, satisfy this condition and thus chose B as the correct answer :).
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 May 2015
Posts: 11
Reviews Badge
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Dec 2015, 04:39
1
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. Please change the definition containing "of some other integer" to " of any integer" ; then the question is right; else 0 and 1 cannot be answers to option 2, thanks.
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 55635
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2016, 10:43
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Feb 2018
Posts: 3
M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 13 May 2018, 11:42
NOTE THIS PLEASE ... the question clearly states that x is an INTEGER so x^2 = x^3 should be sufficient as 0 does not qualify as an integer and x can only take the value 1.THE question starts as if x is an INTEGER.
give me kudos if you think iam right:)

Originally posted by Vibhav10 on 13 May 2018, 11:35.
Last edited by Vibhav10 on 13 May 2018, 11:42, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Feb 2018
Posts: 3
M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2018, 11:40
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. Perfect squares are integers 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, and so on. Similarly, perfect cubes are: 0, 1, 8, 27, 64... Thus \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. For example: \(x\) can still be 0 or 1.


Answer: E

NOTE THIS PLEASE ... the question clearly states that x is an INTEGER so x^2 = x^3 should be sufficient as 0 does not qualify as an integer and x can only take the value 1.THE question starts as if x is an INTEGER. i may be wrong somewhere though.
give me kudos if you think iam right:)
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 55635
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2018, 12:36
Vibhav10 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:


Statement (1) by itself is insufficient. \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statement (2) by itself is insufficient. Perfect squares are integers 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, and so on. Similarly, perfect cubes are: 0, 1, 8, 27, 64... Thus \(x\) can be 0 or 1.

Statements (1) and (2) combined are insufficient. For example: \(x\) can still be 0 or 1.


Answer: E

NOTE THIS PLEASE ... the question clearly states that x is an INTEGER so x^2 = x^3 should be sufficient as 0 does not qualify as an integer and x can only take the value 1.THE question starts as if x is an INTEGER. i may be wrong somewhere though.
give me kudos if you think iam right:)


That's wrong.

ZERO:

1. 0 is an integer.

2. 0 is an even integer. An even number is an integer that is "evenly divisible" by 2, i.e., divisible by 2 without a remainder and as zero is evenly divisible by 2 then it must be even.

3. 0 is neither positive nor negative integer (the only one of this kind).

4. 0 is divisible by EVERY integer except 0 itself.

You should brush-up fundamentals before practising questions:
ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT ! ! !
Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread

Hope it helps.
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Sep 2018
Posts: 1
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Nov 2018, 22:55
totally unfair

i thought about 0 ...then the number has to be a perfect square , cube ...i figured 0 should not be counted :(((((((((((
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 22 Jun 2017
Posts: 178
Location: Argentina
Schools: HBS, Stanford, Wharton
GMAT 1: 630 Q43 V34
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2019, 20:02
Hi! just wanted to know what is 0*0?
_________________
The HARDER you work, the LUCKIER you get.
VP
VP
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Mar 2018
Posts: 1004
Location: India
Re: M02-36  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Feb 2019, 20:41
patto wrote:
Hi! just wanted to know what is 0*0?



patto

It is indeed 0.

Even \(0^3\) = 0

It is part of the perfect squares
_________________
If you notice any discrepancy in my reasoning, please let me know. Lets improve together.

Quote which i can relate to.
Many of life's failures happen with people who do not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: M02-36   [#permalink] 17 Feb 2019, 20:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

M02-36

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: chetan2u, Bunuel



Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne