GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Oct 2019, 16:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

M16-23

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Apr 2016
Posts: 22
GMAT 1: 540 Q42 V23
M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2017, 12:14
Hello Bunuel,

What if : set S = {1,2,3,4} ; Mean=2.5
subset of S ={1,2} ; Mean =1.5

Then option 2 " All elements in set S are equal" does not fit in.
Please let me where am i going wrong.

Thanks,
Saba
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2017, 12:25
1
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Apr 2016
Posts: 22
GMAT 1: 540 Q42 V23
M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2017, 19:53
Bunuel wrote:
saba@4010 wrote:
Hello Bunuel,

What if : set S = {1,2,3,4} ; Mean=2.5
subset of S ={1,2} ; Mean =1.5

Then option 2 " All elements in set S are equal" does not fit in.
Please let me where am i going wrong.

Thanks,
Saba


"The mean of set \(S\) does not exceed mean of ANY subset of set \(S\)".

Your example does not work.

Thanks Bunuel ,understood !

Posted from my mobile device
Current Student
User avatar
B
Joined: 12 Feb 2015
Posts: 54
Location: India
GPA: 3.84
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Aug 2017, 02:47
Just need to confirm one thing.S={1,2,3} then can the subset be like A={1,1,}
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Aug 2017, 05:50
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 May 2017
Posts: 44
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2017, 06:04
Bunuel wrote:
ManSab wrote:
1. Set S contains only one element.
Does it mean count of element or value of element?
My understanding is that set S has only one element by count not by value... therefore {X,X...} is not possible. Please help understand.


Option 1, Set S contains only one element means that there is only one elements in S: {X}. This option is not necessarily true. Please re-read the solution.


Hi,

I am confused with second option. If i didn't misunderstood the question, it state that mean of Set S should be less than mean of its subset.

Lets Consider:

S =(2,4,6) - mean =4
S'= (4,6) - mean = 5

Here Set S has different values. Please advise.

Thanks,
Arpit
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2017, 06:07
NeverGiveUp- Arpit wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
ManSab wrote:
1. Set S contains only one element.
Does it mean count of element or value of element?
My understanding is that set S has only one element by count not by value... therefore {X,X...} is not possible. Please help understand.


Option 1, Set S contains only one element means that there is only one elements in S: {X}. This option is not necessarily true. Please re-read the solution.


Hi,

I am confused with second option. If i didn't misunderstood the question, it state that mean of Set S should be less than mean of its subset.

Lets Consider:

S =(2,4,6) - mean =4
S'= (4,6) - mean = 5

Here Set S has different values. Please advise.

Thanks,
Arpit


I'd advice to re-read the stem and the solution carefully and go through the discussion once more.
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 May 2017
Posts: 44
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2017, 06:56
[quote="Bunuel"

I'd advice to re-read the stem and the solution carefully and go through the discussion once more.[/quote]

Got it. Thanks mate.

I overlooked the word 'Any '.

Posted from my mobile device

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Oct 2015
Posts: 7
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2017, 00:48
What is S= 1,2,3,4,5
Mean=3
Median=3
Subset(4,5); Mean =4.5>3
So, Statment 3: False
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2017, 00:50
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Jun 2017
Posts: 2
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Dec 2017, 15:18
Hello !
For case III, let's take an example where the median of set S equals the mean of set S : set S = {1,2,3}, mean=median=2. In that case, {1} is a subset of set S and 2>1. Conclusion: the mean of set S DOES exceed mean of a subset of set S
How is III still correct ?
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Dec 2017, 01:14
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Aug 2016
Posts: 10
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2018, 00:03
Hi Bunuel,

"If the mean of set S does not exceed mean of any subset of set S''

Does it have to be true that Mean of S and Mean of any subset of S is equal? What if set S has negative numbers?

For Ex:- S= {3,4,5,6,-7} and subset of S is {3,4,5,6}. Here mean does not exceed but is lower that its subset.

In above example none of the three statement holds true? Could you please advise.

Thank you.
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2018, 00:16
hrishipatil72 wrote:
Hi Bunuel,

"If the mean of set S does not exceed mean of any subset of set S''

Does it have to be true that Mean of S and Mean of any subset of S is equal? What if set S has negative numbers?

For Ex:- S= {3,4,5,6,-7} and subset of S is {3,4,5,6}. Here mean does not exceed but is lower that its subset.

In above example none of the three statement holds true? Could you please advise.

Thank you.


The mean of {3, 4, 5, 6, -7} is 2.2.
The mean of one of the subset of the above set, {3, -7}, is 2.

So, your example is not valid.

The stem says: "The mean of set \(S\) does not exceed mean of ANY subset of set \(S\)".
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Mar 2018
Posts: 29
Re M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Aug 2018, 03:47
I don't agree with the explanation. Statement III.
If median of set = mean of set
eg. mean {0,1,2} = median {0,1,2} = 1
here, mean exceeds the subset of set which is {2}.

Only II should be the corret answer?
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Aug 2018, 03:59
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jun 2018
Posts: 1
Re M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Aug 2019, 07:42
I think this is a high-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation.

Posted from my mobile device
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58396
Re: M16-23  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Aug 2019, 07:46
GMAT Club Bot
Re: M16-23   [#permalink] 16 Aug 2019, 07:46

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 38 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

M16-23

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: chetan2u, Bunuel






Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne