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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
vikramd wrote:
(iii) Only one of the integers is positive: {-1, 0, 1}. In this case the product will be zero.

The above cam be replaced with

{-3, 1,5} in this case - assuming consecutive positive integers by a difference of 4 instead of difference by 1

sum of the integer is -3+1+5= 3<6

and product is -15 not equal to Zero

so This is answer D

correct me if I am wrong.


vikramd,

3 consecutive integers means : (x-1), x, (x+1)
x could be any integer. And consecutive itself means with a difference of 1. These are the integers that follow each other in order.
For example: 1,2,3,4... OR -1,0,1,2,3... OR 1001, 1002,1003,1004... OR -2014,-2013,-2012,-2011,-2010...

In addition, consecutive integers could be of 2 categories. Odd consecutive and even consecutive.
Odd consecutive: Odd number with a difference of 2: 1,3,5,7,9... OR -9,-7-5,-3,-1,1,3,5,7...
Even Consecutive: Even numbers with a difference of 2: 2,4,6,8,10... OR -30,-28,-26,-24,-22...

In this question, it is saying 3 consecutive integers. That could be: -10,-9,-8 OR 1,2,3 OR 5,6,7 OR -1,0,1 (Any 3 consecutives)
So what you are saying is not logical.
We cannot have consecutive integers with a difference of 4.

I hope things are clear.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
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scofield1521 wrote:
vikramd wrote:
(iii) Only one of the integers is positive: {-1, 0, 1}. In this case the product will be zero.

The above cam be replaced with

{-3, 1,5} in this case - assuming consecutive positive integers by a difference of 4 instead of difference by 1

sum of the integer is -3+1+5= 3<6

and product is -15 not equal to Zero

so This is answer D

correct me if I am wrong.


vikramd,

3 consecutive integers means : (x-1), x, (x+1)
x could be any integer. And consecutive itself means with a difference of 1. These are the integers that follow each other in order.
For example: 1,2,3,4... OR -1,0,1,2,3... OR 1001, 1002,1003,1004... OR -2014,-2013,-2012,-2011,-2010...

In addition, consecutive integers could be of 2 categories. Odd consecutive and even consecutive.
Odd consecutive: Odd number with a difference of 2: 1,3,5,7,9... OR -9,-7-5,-3,-1,1,3,5,7...
Even Consecutive: Even numbers with a difference of 2: 2,4,6,8,10... OR -30,-28,-26,-24,-22...

In this question, it is saying 3 consecutive integers. That could be: -10,-9,-8 OR 1,2,3 OR 5,6,7 OR -1,0,1 (Any 3 consecutives)
So what you are saying is not logical.
We cannot have consecutive integers with a difference of 4.

I hope things are clear.


"Consecutive integers" ALWAYS mean integers that follow each other in order with common difference of 1: ... x-3, x-2, x-1, x, x+1, x+2, ....

For example:

-7, -6, -5 are consecutive integers.

2, 4, 6 ARE NOT consecutive integers, they are consecutive even integers.

3, 5, 7 ARE NOT consecutive integers, they are consecutive odd integers.

So, not all evenly spaced sets represent consecutive integers.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
I have a question on this one.

I used n, n+1, n+2 as consecutive intergers.
1) At least one is positive means, as Bunuel said, that the product could be 0 or positive. NS
2) Their sum is less than 6.

Could this be:
n + n+1 + n+2 < 6
3n + 3 < 6
3n < 3
n < 1 NS

But together, we know that one needs to be positive and that they are less than 1.
This is confusing me, because if n < 1, then it cannot be positive, since 0 is neither negative nor positive.

However, I did say that it at least cannot be negative, so I said that is it 0, which led to the decision that the product of these consecutive integers will be 0.

So, is there something I am missing here?
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
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pacifist85 wrote:
I have a question on this one.

I used n, n+1, n+2 as consecutive intergers.
1) At least one is positive means, as Bunuel said, that the product could be 0 or positive. NS
2) Their sum is less than 6.

Could this be:
n + n+1 + n+2 < 6
3n + 3 < 6
3n < 3
n < 1 NS

But together, we know that one needs to be positive and that they are less than 1.
This is confusing me, because if n < 1, then it cannot be positive, since 0 is neither negative nor positive.

However, I did say that it at least cannot be negative, so I said that is it 0, which led to the decision that the product of these consecutive integers will be 0.

So, is there something I am missing here?


If n < 1, does that mean that n+1 or n+2 (the other two terms) are negative too?
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. Very nice and crisp explanation.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. Hi, please grade according to the correct answer.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
Nice question. Thought provoking one.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
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I have edited the question and the solution by adding more details to enhance its clarity. I hope it is now easier to understand.
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Re: M25-05 [#permalink]
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